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Portal:Nunavut

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Map of Nunavut
Nunavut (from Inuktitut: ᓄᓇᕗᑦ ) is the largest and newest federal territory of Canada; it was separated officially from the Northwest Territories on April 1, 1999, via the Nunavut Act and the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act, though the actual boundaries had been established in 1993. The creation of Nunavut – meaning "our land" in Inuktitut – resulted in the first major change to Canada's map since the incorporation of the new province of Newfoundland in 1949.

Nunavut comprises a major portion of Northern Canada, and most of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, making it the fifth-largest country subdivision in the world. The capital Iqaluit (formerly "Frobisher Bay") on Baffin Island, in the east, was chosen by the 1995 capital plebiscite. Other major communities include the regional centres of Rankin Inlet and Cambridge Bay. Nunavut also includes Ellesmere Island to the north, as well as the eastern and southern portions of Victoria Island in the west and Akimiski Island in James Bay to the far south. Nunavut is both the least populated and the geographically largest of the provinces and territories of Canada. It has a population of 29,474, mostly Inuit, spread over an area the size of Western Europe. Nunavut is also home to the northernmost permanently inhabited place in the world, Alert.

As of the 2006 Census the population of Nunavut was 29,474, with 24,640 people identifying themselves as Inuit (83.6% of the total population), 100 as First Nations (0.34%), 130 Métis (0.44%) and 4,410 as non-aboriginal (14.96%).

Flag of the Franco-Nunavois.png More about...Nunavut, its history and diversity

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The High Arctic relocation (French: La délocalisation du Haut-Arctique) took place during the Cold War in the 1950s, when 87 Inuit were moved by the Government of Canada to the High Arctic.

The relocation has been a source of controversy: on one hand being described as a humanitarian gesture to save the lives of starving native people and enable them to continue a subsistence lifestyle; and on the other hand, said to be a forced migration instigated by the federal government to assert its sovereignty in the Far North, in light of both the Cold War and the disputed territorial claims to the Arctic archipelago. Both sides acknowledge that the relocated Inuit were not given sufficient support during their first years after the move to prevent extreme privation.

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The Arctic Fox (Alopex lagopus or Vulpes lagopus), also known as the White Fox, Polar Fox or Snow Fox, is a small fox native to cold Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere and is common throughout the Arctic tundra biome. Although it is often assigned to its own genus Alopex, Mammal Species of the World, as well as genetic evidence places it in Vulpes with the majority of the other foxes.

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Kenojuak Ashevak, CC (born October 3, 1927) is regarded as one of the most notable pioneers of modern Inuit art. Kenojuak Ashevak was born in an igloo in an Inuit camp, "Ikirasaq", at the southern coast of Baffin Island.

Kenojuak Ashevak became one of the first Inuit women in Cape Dorset to begin drawing in the late 1950s. She has since created many carvings from soapstone and thousands of drawings, etchings, stone-cuts, and prints — all sought after by museums and collectors. She designed several drawings for Canadian stamps and coins.

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RCMP officer visiting Nach Flaggenhissung bei Nunavut

Nunavut topics

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WikiProject Canadian Territories
The Canadian Territories WikiProject is the group that oversees Nunavut related topics.