ABILIFY (Page 13 of 24)

Dose-Related Adverse Reactions

Schizophrenia

Dose response relationships for the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events were evaluated from four trials in adult patients with schizophrenia comparing various fixed doses (2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 mg/day) of oral ABILIFY to placebo. This analysis, stratified by study, indicated that the only adverse reaction to have a possible dose response relationship, and then most prominent only with 30 mg, was somnolence [including sedation]; (incidences were placebo, 7.1%; 10 mg, 8.5%; 15 mg, 8.7%; 20 mg, 7.5%; 30 mg, 12.6%).

In the study of pediatric patients (13 to 17 years of age) with schizophrenia, three common adverse reactions appeared to have a possible dose response relationship: extrapyramidal disorder (incidences were placebo, 5.0%; 10 mg, 13.0%; 30 mg, 21.6%); somnolence (incidences were placebo, 6.0%; 10 mg, 11.0%; 30 mg, 21.6%); and tremor (incidences were placebo, 2.0%; 10 mg, 2.0%; 30 mg, 11.8%).

Bipolar Mania

In the study of pediatric patients (10 to 17 years of age) with bipolar mania, four common adverse reactions had a possible dose response relationship at 4 weeks; extrapyramidal disorder (incidences were placebo, 3.1%; 10 mg, 12.2%; 30 mg, 27.3%); somnolence (incidences were placebo, 3.1%; 10 mg, 19.4%; 30 mg, 26.3%); akathisia (incidences were placebo, 2.1%; 10 mg, 8.2%; 30 mg, 11.1%); and salivary hypersecretion (incidences were placebo, 0%; 10 mg, 3.1%; 30 mg, 8.1%).

Autistic Disorder

In a study of pediatric patients (6 to 17 years of age) with autistic disorder, one common adverse reaction had a possible dose response relationship: fatigue (incidences were placebo, 0%; 5 mg, 3.8%; 10 mg, 22.0%; 15 mg, 18.5%).

Tourette’s Disorder

In a study of pediatric patients (7 to 17 years of age) with Tourette’s disorder, no common adverse reaction(s) had a dose response relationship.

Extrapyramidal Symptoms

Schizophrenia

In short-term, placebo-controlled trials in schizophrenia in adults, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 13% vs. 12% for placebo; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 8% vs. 4% for placebo. In the short-term, placebo-controlled trial of schizophrenia in pediatric patients (13 to 17 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 25% vs. 7% for placebo; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 9% vs. 6% for placebo.

Objectively collected data from those trials was collected on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS), the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia), and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales (for dyskinesias). In the adult schizophrenia trials, the objectively collected data did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo, with the exception of the Barnes Akathisia Scale (ABILIFY, 0.08; placebo, –0.05). In the pediatric (13 to 17 years) schizophrenia trial, the objectively collected data did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo, with the exception of the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (ABILIFY, 0.24; placebo, –0.29).

Similarly, in a long-term (26-week), placebo-controlled trial of schizophrenia in adults, objectively collected data on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS), the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia), and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales (for dyskinesias) did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo.

Bipolar Mania

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in bipolar mania in adults, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for monotherapy ABILIFY-treated patients was 16% vs. 8% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for monotherapy ABILIFY-treated patients was 13% vs. 4% for placebo. In the 6-week, placebo-controlled trial in bipolar mania for adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 15% vs. 8% for adjunctive placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 19% vs. 5% for adjunctive placebo. In the short-term, placebo-controlled trial in bipolar mania in pediatric (10 to 17 years) patients, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 26% vs. 5% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 10% vs. 2% for placebo.

In the adult bipolar mania trials with monotherapy ABILIFY, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.50; placebo, –0.01 and ABILIFY, 0.21; placebo, –0.05). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups. In the bipolar mania trials with ABILIFY as adjunctive therapy with either lithium or valproate, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo (ABILIFY, 0.73; placebo, 0.07 and ABILIFY, 0.30; placebo, 0.11). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo. In the pediatric (10 to 17 years), short-term, bipolar mania trial, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.90; placebo, −0.05). Changes in the Barnes Akathisia Scale and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups.

Major Depressive Disorder

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder, the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 8% vs. 5% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients; and the incidence of akathisia-related events for adjunctive ABILIFY-treated patients was 25% vs. 4% for adjunctive placebo-treated patients.

In the major depressive disorder trials, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale and the Barnes Akathisia Scale showed a significant difference between adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo (ABILIFY, 0.31; placebo, 0.03 and ABILIFY, 0.22; placebo, 0.02). Changes in the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the adjunctive ABILIFY and adjunctive placebo groups.

Autistic Disorder

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in autistic disorder in pediatric patients (6 to 17 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 18% vs. 2% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 3% vs. 9% for placebo.

In the pediatric (6 to 17 years) short-term autistic disorder trials, the Simpson Angus Rating Scale showed a significant difference between ABILIFY and placebo (ABILIFY, 0.1; placebo, –0.4). Changes in the Barnes Akathisia Scale and the Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scales were similar for the ABILIFY and placebo groups.

Tourette’s Disorder

In the short-term, placebo-controlled trials in Tourette’s disorder in pediatric patients (6 to 18 years), the incidence of reported EPS-related events, excluding events related to akathisia, for ABILIFY-treated patients was 7% vs. 6% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 4% vs. 6% for placebo.

In the pediatric (6 to 18 years) short-term Tourette’s disorder trials, changes in the Simpson Angus Rating Scale, Barnes Akathisia Scale and Assessments of Involuntary Movement Scale were not clinically meaningfully different for ABILIFY and placebo.

Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Mania

In the placebo-controlled trials in patients with agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, the incidence of reported EPS-related events excluding events related to akathisia for ABILIFY-treated patients was 2% vs. 2% for placebo and the incidence of akathisia-related events for ABILIFY-treated patients was 2% vs. 0% for placebo. Objectively collected data on the Simpson Angus Rating Scale (for EPS) and the Barnes Akathisia Scale (for akathisia) for all treatment groups did not show a difference between ABILIFY and placebo.

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