AcipHex (Page 4 of 10)

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no available human data on ACIPHEX use in pregnant women to inform the drug associated risk. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations are unknown. However, the background risk in the U.S. general population of major birth defects is 2 to 4% and of miscarriage is 15 to 20% of clinically recognized pregnancies. No evidence of adverse developmental effects were seen in animal reproduction studies with rabeprazole administered during organogenesis at 13 and 8 times the human area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) at the recommended dose for GERD, in rats and rabbits, respectively [ see Data ].

Changes in bone morphology were observed in offspring of rats treated with oral doses of a different PPI through most of pregnancy and lactation. When maternal administration was confined to gestation only, there were no effects on bone physeal morphology in the offspring at any age [ see Data ].

Data

Animal Data

Embryo-fetal developmental studies have been performed in rats during organogenesis at intravenous doses of rabeprazole up to 50 mg/kg/day (plasma AUC of 11.8 µg•hr/mL, about 13 times the human exposure at the recommended oral dose for GERD) and rabbits at intravenous doses up to 30 mg/kg/day (plasma AUC of 7.3 µg•hr/mL, about 8 times the human exposure at the recommended oral dose for GERD) and have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus due to rabeprazole.

Administration of rabeprazole to rats in late gestation and during lactation at an oral dose of 400 mg/kg/day (about 195-times the human oral dose based on mg/m2) resulted in decreases in body weight gain of the pups.

A pre- and postnatal developmental toxicity study in rats with additional endpoints to evaluate bone development was performed with a different PPI at about 3.4 to 57 times an oral human dose on a body surface area basis. Decreased femur length, width and thickness of cortical bone, decreased thickness of the tibial growth plate, and minimal to mild bone marrow hypocellularity were noted at doses of this PPI equal to or greater than 3.4 times an oral human dose on a body surface area basis. Physeal dysplasia in the femur was also observed in offspring after in utero and lactational exposure to the PPI at doses equal to or greater than 33.6 times an oral human dose on a body surface area basis. Effects on maternal bone were observed in pregnant and lactating rats in a pre- and postnatal toxicity study when the PPI was administered at oral doses of 3.4 to 57 times an oral human dose on a body surface area basis. When rats were dosed from gestational day 7 through weaning on postnatal day 21, a statistically significant decrease in maternal femur weight of up to 14% (as compared to placebo treatment) was observed at doses equal to or greater than 33.6 times an oral human dose on a body surface area basis.

A follow-up developmental toxicity study in rats with further time points to evaluate pup bone development from postnatal day 2 to adulthood was performed with a different PPI at oral doses of 280 mg/kg/day (about 68 times an oral human dose on a body surface area basis) where drug administration was from either gestational day 7 or gestational day 16 until parturition. When maternal administration was confined to gestation only, there were no effects on bone physeal morphology in the offspring at any age.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Lactation studies have not been conducted to assess the presence of rabeprazole in human milk, the effects of rabeprazole on the breastfed infant, or the effects of rabeprazole on milk production. Rabeprazole is present in rat milk. The development and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for ACIPHEX and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from ACIPHEX or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of ACIPHEX delayed-release tablets have been established in pediatric patients for adolescent patients 12 years of age and older for the treatment of symptomatic GERD. Use of ACIPHEX delayed-release tablets in this age group is supported by adequate and well controlled studies in adults and a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study in 111 adolescent patients 12 to 16 years of age. Patients had a clinical diagnosis of symptomatic GERD, or suspected or endoscopically proven GERD and were randomized to either 10 mg or 20 mg once daily for up to 8 weeks for the evaluation of safety and efficacy. The adverse reaction profile in adolescent patients was similar to that of adults. The related reported adverse reactions that occurred in ≥2% of patients were headache (5%) and nausea (2%). There were no adverse reactions reported in these studies that were not previously observed in adults.

The safety and effectiveness of ACIPHEX delayed-release tablets have not been established in pediatric patients for:

  • Healing of Erosive or Ulcerative GERD
  • Maintenance of Healing of Erosive or Ulcerative GERD
  • Treatment of Symptomatic GERD
  • Healing of Duodenal Ulcers
  • Helicobacter pylori Eradication to Reduce the Risk of Duodenal Ulcer Recurrence
  • Treatment of Pathological Hypersecretory Conditions, Including Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

ACIPHEX delayed-release 20 mg tablets are not recommended for use in pediatric patients less than 12 years of age because the tablet strength exceeds the recommended dose for these patients [see Dosage and Administration (2)]. For pediatric patients 1 year to less than 12 years of age consider another rabeprazole formulation. The safety and effectiveness of a different dosage form and dosage strength of rabeprazole has been established in pediatric patients 1 to 11 years for the treatment of GERD.

Juvenile Animal Data

Studies in juvenile and young adult rats and dogs were performed. In juvenile animal studies rabeprazole sodium was administered orally to rats for up to 5 weeks and to dogs for up to 13 weeks, each commencing on Day 7 post-partum and followed by a 13-week recovery period. Rats were dosed at 5, 25, or 150 mg/kg/day and dogs were dosed at 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg/day. The data from these studies were comparable to those reported for young adult animals. Pharmacologically mediated changes, including increased serum gastrin levels and stomach changes, were observed at all dose levels in both rats and dogs. These observations were reversible over the 13-week recovery periods. Although body weights and/or crown-rump lengths were minimally decreased during dosing, no effects on the development parameters were noted in either juvenile rats or dogs.

When juvenile animals were treated for 28 days with a different PPI at doses equal to or greater than 34 times the daily oral human dose on a body surface area basis, overall growth was affected and treatment-related decreases in body weight (approximately 14%) and body weight gain, and decreases in femur weight and femur length were observed.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of the total number of subjects (n=2009) in clinical studies of ACIPHEX delayed-release tablets, 19% were 65 years and over, while 4% were 75 years and over. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

8 . 6 Hepatic Impairment

Administration of ACIPHEX delayed-release tablets to patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A and B, respectively) resulted in increased exposure and decreased elimination [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. No dosage adjustment is necessary in patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment. There is no information in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C). Avoid use of ACIPHEX delayed-release tablets in patients with severe hepatic impairment; however, if treatment is necessary, monitor patients for adverse reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5), Adverse Reactions (6)].

10 OVERDOSAGE

Seven reports of accidental overdosage with rabeprazole have been received. The maximum reported overdose was 80 mg. There were no clinical signs or symptoms associated with any reported overdose. Patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome have been treated with up to 120 mg rabeprazole once daily. No specific antidote for rabeprazole is known. Rabeprazole is extensively protein bound and is not readily dialyzable.

In the event of overdosage, treatment should be symptomatic and supportive.

If over-exposure occurs, call your Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 for current information on the management of poisoning or overdosage.

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