ACTEMRA (Page 6 of 15)

6.2 Clinical Trials Experience in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Treated with Subcutaneous ACTEMRA (ACTEMRA-SC)

The ACTEMRA-SC data in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) includes 2 double-blind, controlled, multicenter studies. Study SC-I was a non-inferiority study that compared the efficacy and safety of tocilizumab 162 mg administered every week subcutaneously and 8 mg/kg intravenously every four weeks in 1262 adult subjects with rheumatoid arthritis. Study SC-II was a placebo controlled superiority study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of tocilizumab 162 mg administered every other week subcutaneously or placebo in 656 patients. All patients in both studies received background non-biologic DMARDs.

The safety observed for ACTEMRA-SC administered subcutaneously was consistent with the known safety profile of intravenous ACTEMRA, with the exception of injection site reactions (ISRs), which were more common with ACTEMRA-SC compared with placebo SC injections (IV arm).

Injection Site Reactions

In the 6-month control period, in SC-I, the frequency of ISRs was 10.1% (64/631) and 2.4% (15/631) for the weekly ACTEMRA-SC and placebo SC (IV-arm) groups, respectively. In SC-II, the frequency of ISRs was 7.1% (31/437) and 4.1% (9/218) for the every other week ACTEMRA-SC and placebo groups, respectively. These ISRs (including erythema, pruritus, pain and hematoma) were mild to moderate in severity. The majority resolved without any treatment and none necessitated drug discontinuation.

Immunogenicity

In the 6-month control period in SC-I, 0.8% (5/625) in the ACTEMRA-SC arm and 0.8% (5/627) in the IV arm developed anti-tocilizumab antibodies; of these, all developed neutralizing antibodies. In SC-II, 1.6% (7/434) in the ACTEMRA-SC arm compared with 1.4 % (3/217) in the placebo arm developed anti- tocilizumab antibodies; of these, 1.4% (6/434) in the ACTEMRA-SC arm and 0.5% (1/217) in the placebo arm also developed neutralizing antibodies.

A total of 1454 (>99%) patients who received ACTEMRA-SC in the all exposure group have been tested for anti-tocilizumab antibodies. Thirteen patients (0.9%) developed anti-tocilizumab antibodies, and, of these, 12 patients (0.8%) developed neutralizing antibodies.

The rate is consistent with previous intravenous experience. No correlation of antibody development to adverse events or loss of clinical response was observed.

Laboratory Abnormalities

Neutropenia

During routine laboratory monitoring in the 6-month controlled clinical trials, a decrease in neutrophil count below 1 × 109 /L occurred in 2.9% and 3.7% of patients receiving ACTEMRA-SC weekly and every other week, respectively.

There was no clear relationship between decreases in neutrophils below 1 × 109 /L and the occurrence of serious infections.

Thrombocytopenia

During routine laboratory monitoring in the ACTEMRA-SC 6-month controlled clinical trials, none of the patients had a decrease in platelet count to ≤50,000/mm3.

Elevated Liver Enzymes

During routine laboratory monitoring in the 6-month controlled clinical trials, elevation in ALT or AST ≥3 × ULN occurred in 6.5% and 1.4% of patients, respectively, receiving ACTEMRA-SC weekly and 3.4% and 0.7% receiving ACTEMRA-SC every other week.

Lipid Parameters Elevations

During routine laboratory monitoring in the ACTEMRA-SC 6-month clinical trials, 19% of patients dosed weekly and 19.6% of patients dosed every other week and 10.2% of patients on placebo experienced sustained elevations in total cholesterol > 6.2 mmol/l (240 mg/dL), with 9%, 10.4% and 5.1% experiencing a sustained increase in LDL to 4.1 mmol/l (160 mg/dL) receiving ACTEMRA-SC weekly, every other week and placebo, respectively.

6.3 Clinical Trials Experience in Giant Cell Arteritis Patients Treated with Subcutaneous ACTEMRA (ACTEMRA-SC)

The safety of subcutaneous ACTEMRA (tocilizumab) has been studied in one Phase III study (WA28119) with 251 GCA patients. The total patient years duration in the ACTEMRA-SC GCA all exposure population was 138.5 patient years during the 12-month double blind, placebo-controlled phase of the study. The overall safety profile observed in the ACTEMRA-SC treatment groups was generally consistent with the known safety profile of ACTEMRA. There was an overall higher incidence of infections in GCA patients relative to RA patients. The rate of infection/serious infection events was 200.2/9.7 events per 100 patient years in the ACTEMRA-SC weekly group and 160.2/4.4 events per 100 patient years in the ACTEMRA-SC every other week group as compared to 156.0/4.2 events per 100 patient years in the placebo + 26 week prednisone taper and 210.2/12.5 events per 100 patient years in the placebo + 52 week taper groups.

6.4 Clinical Trials Experience in Giant Cell Arteritis Patients Treated With Intravenous ACTEMRA (ACTEMRA-IV)

The safety of ACTEMRA-IV was studied in an open label PK-PD and safety study in 24 patients with GCA who were in remission on ACTEMRA-IV at time of enrollment. Patients received ACTEMRA 7 mg/kg every 4 weeks for 20 weeks, followed by 6 mg/kg every 4 weeks for 20 weeks. The total patient years exposure to treatment was 17.5 years. The overall safety profile observed for ACTEMRA administered intravenously in GCA patients was consistent with the known safety profile of ACTEMRA.

6.5 Clinical Trials Experience in Systemic Sclerosis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease Patients Treated with Subcutaneous ACTEMRA (ACTEMRA-SC)

The safety of subcutaneous ACTEMRA was evaluated in two double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter studies (WA29767 and WA27788). In the Phase 3 Study WA29767, 212 patients with SSc were randomized to tocilizumab 162 mg administered every week subcutaneously or placebo for 48 weeks, followed by open-label tocilizumab 162 mg administered subcutaneously every week for another 48 weeks. In the Phase 2/3 Study WA27788, 87 patients were randomized to tocilizumab 162 mg administered every week subcutaneously or placebo for 48 weeks, followed by open-label tocilizumab 162 mg administered subcutaneously every week for another 48 weeks.

The safety profile for ACTEMRA through week 48 in WA29767 was comparable for SSc-ILD and SSc patients overall, and in both studies was consistent with the known safety profile of ACTEMRA.

Immunogenicity

In the two clinical studies, WA29767 and WA27788, the incidence of treatment-induced anti-TCZ antibodies at week 96 was low (3 out of 169 patients, 1.8%). These anti-drug antibodies were of neutralizing potential, and none of the patients experienced hypersensitivity reactions.

6.6 Clinical Trials Experience in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients Treated With Intravenous ACTEMRA (ACTEMRA-IV)

The safety of ACTEMRA-IV was studied in 188 pediatric patients 2 to 17 years of age with PJIA who had an inadequate clinical response or were intolerant to methotrexate. The total patient exposure in the ACTEMRA-IV all exposure population (defined as patients who received at least one dose of ACTEMRA-IV) was 184.4 patient years. At baseline, approximately half of the patients were taking oral corticosteroids and almost 80% were taking methotrexate. In general, the types of adverse drug reactions in patients with PJIA were consistent with those seen in RA and SJIA patients [see Adverse Reactions (6.1 and 6.8)].

Infections

The rate of infections in the ACTEMRA-IV all exposure population was 163.7 per 100 patient years. The most common events observed were nasopharyngitis and upper respiratory tract infections. The rate of serious infections was numerically higher in patients weighing less than 30 kg treated with 10 mg/kg tocilizumab (12.2 per 100 patient years) compared to patients weighing at or above 30 kg, treated with 8 mg/kg tocilizumab (4.0 per 100 patient years). The incidence of infections leading to dose interruptions was also numerically higher in patients weighing less than 30 kg treated with 10 mg/kg tocilizumab (21%) compared to patients weighing at or above 30 kg, treated with 8 mg/kg tocilizumab (8%).

Infusion Reactions

In PJIA patients, infusion-related reactions are defined as all events occurring during or within 24 hours of an infusion. In the ACTEMRA-IV all exposure population, 11 patients (6%) experienced an event during the infusion, and 38 patients (20.2%) experienced an event within 24 hours of an infusion. The most common events occurring during infusion were headache, nausea and hypotension, and occurring within 24 hours of infusion were dizziness and hypotension. In general, the adverse drug reactions observed during or within 24 hours of an infusion were similar in nature to those seen in RA and SJIA patients [see Adverse Reactions (6.1 and 6.8)].

No clinically significant hypersensitivity reactions associated with tocilizumab and requiring treatment discontinuation were reported.

Immunogenicity

One patient, in the 10 mg/kg less than 30 kg group, developed positive anti-tocilizumab antibodies without developing a hypersensitivity reaction and subsequently withdrew from the study.

Laboratory Abnormalities

Neutropenia

During routine laboratory monitoring in the ACTEMRA-IV all exposure population, a decrease in neutrophil counts below 1 × 109 per L occurred in 3.7% of patients.

There was no clear relationship between decreases in neutrophils below 1 × 109 per L and the occurrence of serious infections.

Thrombocytopenia

During routine laboratory monitoring in the ACTEMRA-IV all exposure population, 1% of patients had a decrease in platelet count at or less than 50,000 per mm3 without associated bleeding events.

Elevated Liver Enzymes

During routine laboratory monitoring in the ACTEMRA-IV all exposure population, elevation in ALT or AST at or greater than 3 × ULN occurred in 4% and less than 1% of patients, respectively.

Lipids

During routine laboratory monitoring in the tocilizumab all exposure population, elevation in total cholesterol greater than 1.5-2 × ULN occurred in one patient (0.5%) and elevation in LDL greater than 1.5-2 × ULN occurred in one patient (0.5%).

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