AKLIEF (Page 2 of 4)

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Topical application of AKLIEF Cream is not expected to affect the circulating concentrations of oral hormonal contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary
Available data from clinical trials with AKLIEF Cream use in pregnant women have not identified a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. There are case reports of major birth defects similar to those seen in fetuses exposed to oral retinoids in pregnant women exposed to other topical retinoids, but these case reports do not establish a pattern or association with retinoid-related embryopathy.
In animal reproduction studies, oral doses of trifarotene administered to pregnant rats and rabbits during organogenesis that resulted in systemic exposures more than 800 times the systemic exposure at the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of AKLIEF Cream resulted in adverse fetal effects, including fetal deaths and external, visceral, and skeletal malformations (see Data). The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the US general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively.

Data
Animal Data
Oral administration of trifarotene to pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis at doses that resulted in systemic exposures greater than 1600 times those in humans at the MRHD of AKLIEF Cream resulted in adverse fetal effects, including fetal deaths, reduced mean fetal weight, and external, visceral, and skeletal malformations.
Oral administration of trifarotene to pregnant rabbits during the period of organogenesis at doses that resulted in systemic exposures at least 800 times those in humans at the MRHD of AKLIEF Cream resulted in adverse fetal effects, including defects of the tail, limbs, urogenital organs, and vertebral column.
Trifarotene administered orally to female rats from gestation Day 6 to lactation Day 20, at doses that resulted in systemic exposures up to 594 times those in humans at the MRHD of AKLIEF Cream, had no effect on maternal function or behavior, including gestation, delivery, pup-rearing, lactation and nursing, or survival or development of pups. There were no effects of maternal treatment on behavior, learning, memory, or reproductive function of pups.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary
There are no data on the presence of trifarotene in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. In animal studies, trifarotene was present in rat milk with oral administration of the drug. When a drug is present in animal milk, it is likely that the drug will be present in human milk. It is possible that topical administration of large amounts of trifarotene could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in human milk (see Clinical Considerations). The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for AKLIEF Cream and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from AKLIEF Cream or from the underlying maternal condition.
Clinical Considerations
To minimize potential exposure to the breastfed infant via breastmilk, use AKLIEF Cream on the smallest area of skin and for the shortest duration possible while breastfeeding. Advise breastfeeding women not to apply AKLIEF Cream directly to the nipple and areola to avoid direct infant exposure.

8.4 Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness of AKLIEF Cream for the topical treatment of acne vulgaris have been established in pediatric patients age 9 years to 17 years based on evidence from well-controlled clinical trials, a long-term safety trial, and a pharmacokinetic trial. A total of 897 pediatric subjects aged 9 to 17 years received AKLIEF Cream in the clinical trials [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) and Clinical Studies (14)].
Safety and effectiveness of AKLIEF Cream have not been established in pediatric subjects under the age of 9 years.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical trials of AKLIEF Cream did not include any subjects aged 65 years and over to determine whether they respond differently than younger subjects.

11 DESCRIPTION

AKLIEF Cream for topical administration contains 0.005% (50 mcg/g) trifarotene. Trifarotene is a terphenyl acid derivative and is a retinoid. The chemical name of trifarotene is 3”-tert-Butyl-4’-(2-hydroxy-ethoxy)-4”-pyrrolidin-1-yl-[1,1’,3’,1”]terphenyl-4- carboxylic acid. Trifarotene has the molecular formula of C29 H33 NO4 , the molecular weight of 459.58, and the following structural formula:

trifarotene chemical structure
(click image for full-size original)

Trifarotene is a white to off-white to slightly yellow powder with the melting point of 245°C. It is practically insoluble in water with pKa1 of 5.69 and pKa2 of 4.55.
AKLIEF (trifarotene) Cream 0.005% contains the following inactive ingredients: allantoin, copolymer of acrylamide and sodium acryloyldimethyltaurate dispersion 40% in isohexadecane, cyclomethicone, 95% (v/v) ethanol, medium-chain triglycerides, phenoxyethanol, propylene glycol, purified water.

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

Trifarotene is an agonist of retinoic acid receptors (RAR), with particular activity at the gamma subtype of RAR. Stimulation of RAR results in modulation of target genes which are associated with various processes, including cell differentiation and mediation of inflammation. The exact process by which trifarotene ameliorates acne is unknown.

12.2 Pharmacodynamics

At the approved recommended dosage, AKLIEF Cream does not prolong the QT interval to any clinically relevant extent.

12.3 Pharmacokinetics

Pharmacokinetics of trifarotene was evaluated in a study involving 19 adult subjects with acne vulgaris following once daily application of AKLIEF Cream for 29 days (daily dose range 1.5 g/day to 2 g/day) to the face, shoulders, chest and upper back.
Absorption:
Systemic concentrations were at steady state following 2 weeks of treatment and were quantifiable in 7 subjects. Steady state Cmax ranged from below the limit of quantification (less than 5 pg/mL) to 10 pg/mL and AUC0-24h ranged from 75 to 104 pg.h/mL in adults. No drug accumulation is expected with long-term use.

Distribution
Plasma protein binding is approximately 99.9%

Elimination
The terminal half-life ranged from 2 to 9 hours.
Metabolism
Trifarotene is primarily metabolized by CYP2C9, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, and to a lesser extent by CYP2B6 in vitro.
Excretion
Trifarotene is primarily excreted by the feces.

Specific Populations
Pediatric Patients
Steady state Cmax ranged from less than 5 pg/mL to 9 pg/mL and AUC0-24h ranged from 89 to 106 pg.h/mL in pediatrics (10 to 17- years-old). Steady state conditions were achieved in patients following 2 weeks of topical administration. No drug accumulation is expected with long-term use.

Drug Interactions Studies
Clinical Studies and Model-Based Approaches
No clinically significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of trifarotene were predicted when used concomitantly with fluconazole (a moderate CYP2C9 and CYP3A inhibitor).

In Vitro Studies
Cytochrome P450 (CYP) Enzymes: AKLIEF Cream is not expected to inhibit CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4, or induce CYP1A2, 2B6, and 3A4.
Transporter Systems: AKLIEF Cream is not expected to inhibit MATE, OATP, OAT, OCT, BCRP, P-gp, BSEP, or MRP.

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