Amoxicillin (Page 2 of 7)

2.4 Dosing in Renal Impairment

  • Patients with impaired renal function do not generally require a reduction in dose unless the impairment is severe.
  • Severely impaired patients with a glomerular filtration rate of < 30 mL/min should not receive a 875 mg dose.
  • Patients with a glomerular filtration rate of 10 to 30 mL/min should receive 500 mg or 250 mg every 12 hours, depending on the severity of the infection.
  • Patients with a glomerular filtration rate less than 10 mL/min should receive 500 mg or 250 mg every 24 hours, depending on severity of the infection.
  • Hemodialysis patients should receive 500 mg or 250 mg every 24 hours, depending on severity of the infection. They should receive an additional dose both during and at the end of dialysis.

2.5 Directions for Mixing Oral Suspension

Tap bottle until all powder flows freely. Add approximately 1/3 of the total amount of water for reconstitution (see Table 2) and shake vigorously to wet powder. Add remainder of the water and again shake vigorously.

Table 2. Amount of Water for Mixing Oral Suspension

Strength

Bottle Size

Amount of Water

Required for Reconstitution

Oral Suspension 125 mg/5 mL

80 mL

62 mL

100 mL

77 mL

150 mL

113 mL

Oral Suspension 250 mg/5 mL

80 mL

47 mL

100 mL

60 mL

150 mL

90 mL

After reconstitution, the required amount of suspension should be placed directly on the child’s tongue for swallowing. Alternate means of administration are to add the required amount of suspension to formula, milk, fruit juice, water, ginger ale, or cold drinks. These preparations should then be taken immediately.

NOTE: SHAKE ORAL SUSPENSION WELL BEFORE USING. Keep bottle tightly closed. Any unused portion of the reconstituted suspension must be discarded after 14 days. Refrigeration is preferable, but not required.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Amoxicillin Capsules USP

250 mg: Opaque caramel cap and opaque buff body, hard gelatin capsule. Printed black “TEVA” on cap and “3107” on body portions of the capsule and contain 250 mg amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

500 mg: Opaque buff cap and opaque buff body, hard gelatin capsules. Printed black “TEVA” on cap and “3109” on body portions of the capsules and contain 500 mg amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

Amoxicillin for Oral Suspension USP

125 mg/5 mL: Each 5 mL of reconstituted mixed berry flavored suspension contains 125 mg amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

250 mg/5 mL: Each 5 mL of reconstituted mixed berry flavored suspension contains 250 mg amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

Amoxicillin Tablets USP (Chewable)

125 mg: White to off-white, capsule-shaped tablet, debossed 93 on one side and 2267 on the other side and contain 125 mg amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

250 mg: White to off-white, capsule-shaped tablet, debossed 93 (partial bisect between 9 and 3) on one side and 2268 on the other side and contain 250 mg amoxicillin as the trihydrate.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

Amoxicillin is contraindicated in patients who have experienced a serious hypersensitivity reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis or Stevens-Johnson syndrome) to amoxicillin or to other β-lactam antibiotics (e.g., penicillins and cephalosporins).

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Anaphylactic Reactions

Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactic) reactions have been reported in patients on penicillin therapy including amoxicillin. Although anaphylaxis is more frequent following parenteral therapy, it has occurred in patients on oral penicillins. These reactions are more likely to occur in individuals with a history of penicillin hypersensitivity and/or a history of sensitivity to multiple allergens. There have been reports of individuals with a history of penicillin hypersensitivity who have experienced severe reactions when treated with cephalosporins. Before initiating therapy with amoxicillin, careful inquiry should be made regarding previous hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins, cephalosporins, or other allergens. If an allergic reaction occurs, amoxicillin should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.

5.2 Clostridium difficile Associated Diarrhea

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile.

C. difficile produces toxins A and B which contribute to the development of CDAD. Hypertoxin-producing strains of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD must be considered in all patients who present with diarrhea following antibacterial use. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over 2 months after the administration of antibacterial agents.

If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Appropriate fluid and electrolyte management, protein supplementation, antibiotic treatment of C. difficile , and surgical evaluation should be instituted as clinically indicated.

5.3 Development of Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Prescribing amoxicillin in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

5.4 Use in Patients With Mononucleosis

A high percentage of patients with mononucleosis who receive amoxicillin develop an erythematous skin rash. Thus amoxicillin should not be administered to patients with mononucleosis.

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

The following are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling:

  • Anaphylactic reactions [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1) ]
  • CDAD [ see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.2) ]

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