ARTHROTEC (Page 6 of 11)

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

ARTHROTEC is contraindicated in pregnant women [see Contraindications (4)] .

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of ARTHROTEC in pregnant women; however, there is information available about the active drug components of ARTHROTEC, diclofenac sodium and misoprostol. Administration of misoprostol to pregnant women can cause abortion, premature birth, birth defects or uterine rupture. Congenital anomalies sometimes associated with fetal death have been reported subsequent to the unsuccessful use of misoprostol as an abortifacient, but the drug’s teratogenic mechanism has not been demonstrated. Use of NSAIDS, including diclofenac a component of ARTHROTEC, can cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus and fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios and, in some cases, neonatal renal impairment (see Data). There are clinical considerations when misoprostol and diclofenac are used in pregnant women (see Clinical Considerations). In reproduction studies with pregnant rabbits, there were no skeletal or visceral malformations when the combination of diclofenac sodium and misoprostol was administered during organogenesis at doses less than the maximum recommended human doses (MRHD); however, embryotoxicity was observed at this exposure (see Data). Based on animal data, prostaglandins have been shown to have an important role in endometrial vascular permeability, blastocyst implantation, and decidualization. In animal studies, administration of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors such as diclofenac, resulted in increased pre- and post-implantation loss. If a woman becomes pregnant while taking ARTHROTEC, discontinue the drug and advise the woman of the potential risks to her and to a fetus.

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2–4% and 15–20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Maternal Adverse Reactions

Misoprostol may produce uterine contractions, uterine bleeding, and expulsion of the products of conception. Misoprostol has been used to ripen the cervix, to induce labor, and to treat postpartum hemorrhage, outside of its approved indication. A major adverse effect of these uses is hyperstimulation of the uterus. Uterine rupture, amniotic fluid embolism, severe bleeding, shock, and maternal death have been reported when misoprostol was administered to pregnant women to induce labor to induce abortion beyond the eight week of pregnancy. Higher doses of misoprostol, including the 100 mcg tablet, may increase the risk of complications from uterine hyperstimulation. ARTHROTEC, which contains 200 mcg of misoprostol, is likely to have a greater risk of uterine hyperstimulation than the 100 mcg tablet of misoprostol. Abortions caused by misoprostol may be incomplete.

Cases of amniotic fluid embolism, which resulted in maternal and fetal death, have been reported with use of misoprostol during pregnancy. Severe vaginal bleeding, retained placenta, shock, and pelvic pain have also been reported. These women were administered misoprostol vaginally and/or orally over a range of doses. If a woman is or becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the drug should be discontinued and the patient apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.

ARTHROTEC is contraindicated in pregnant women [see Contraindications (4)] .

Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reactions

Misoprostol

Misoprostol may endanger pregnancy (may cause abortion) and thereby cause harm to the fetus when administered to a pregnant woman. Use of misoprostol for the induction of labor in the third trimester was associated with uterine hyperstimulation with resulting changes in the fetal heart rate (fetal bradycardia) and fetal death. ARTHROTEC is contraindicated in pregnant women [see Contraindications (4)] .

Diclofenac

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus:

NSAIDs, including diclofenac, can cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus at about 30 weeks gestation and later in pregnancy (see Data).

Oligohydramnios/Neonatal Renal Impairment:

Use of NSAIDs, including diclofenac, at about 20 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy has been associated with cases of fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios, and in some cases, neonatal renal impairment (see Data).

Labor or Delivery

There are no studies on the effects of ARTHROTEC or diclofenac during labor or delivery. In animal studies, NSAIDS, including diclofenac, are known to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, cause delayed parturition, and increase the incidence of stillbirth. In humans, some case reports and studies have associated misoprostol with risk of stillbirth, uterine hyperstimulation, perineal tear, amniotic fluid embolism, severe bleeding, shock, uterine rupture and death. The risk of uterine rupture associated with misoprostol use in pregnancy may occur at any gestational age, and increases with advancing gestational ages and with prior uterine surgery, including cesarean delivery. Grand multiparity also appears to be a risk factor for uterine rupture.

Data

Human Data

Misoprostol

Several reports in the literature associate the use of misoprostol during the first trimester of pregnancy with skull defects, cranial nerve palsies, facial malformations, and limb defects.

Diclofenac

Data from observational studies regarding potential embryo-fetal risks of NSAID use (including diclofenac) in the first or second trimesters of pregnancy are inconclusive.

Premature Closure of Fetal Ductus Arteriosus:

Published literature reports that the use of NSAIDs at about 30 weeks of gestation and later in pregnancy may cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus.

Oligohydramnios/Neonatal Renal Impairment:

Published studies and postmarketing reports describe maternal NSAID use at about 20 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy associated with fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios, and in some cases, neonatal renal impairment. These adverse outcomes are seen, on average, after days to weeks of treatment, although oligohydramnios has been infrequently reported as soon as 48 hours after NSAID initiation. In many cases, but not all, the decrease in amniotic fluid was transient and reversible with cessation of the drug. There have been a limited number of case reports of maternal NSAID use and neonatal renal dysfunction without oligohydramnios, some of which were irreversible. Some cases of neonatal renal dysfunction required treatment with invasive procedures, such as exchange transfusion or dialysis.

Methodological limitations of these postmarketing studies and reports include lack of a control group; limited information regarding dose, duration, and timing of drug exposure; and concomitant use of other medications. These limitations preclude establishing a reliable estimate of the risk of adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes with maternal NSAID use. Because the published safety data on neonatal outcomes involved mostly preterm infants, the generalizability of certain reported risks to the full-term infant exposed to NSAIDs through maternal use is uncertain.

Animal Data

The reproductive and developmental effects of both the combination of diclofenac sodium and misoprostol and each component of ARTHROTEC alone have been studied in animals. In all studies there was no evidence of teratogenicity. In an oral teratology study in pregnant rabbits, ARTHROTEC was administered at dose combinations (diclofenac and misoprostol, 250:1 ratio) up to 10 mg/kg/day diclofenac sodium (120 mg/m2 /day, 0.8 times the recommended maximum human dose based on body surface area) and 0.04 mg/kg/day misoprostol (0.48 mg/m2 /day, 0.8 times the recommended maximum human dose based on body surface area) and there was no evidence of teratogenicity. At the high dose, there was evidence of embryotoxicity (resorption and decreased fetal body weight) and maternal toxicity (decreased food intake and weight gain).

In oral teratology studies with misoprostol in pregnant rats at doses up to 1.6 mg/kg/day (9.6 mg/m2 /day, 16 times the recommended maximum human dose based on body surface area) and pregnant rabbits at doses up to 1.0 mg/kg/day (12 mg/m2 /day, 20 times the recommended maximum human dose based on body surface area), there was no evidence of teratogenicity.

In oral teratology studies with diclofenac sodium in pregnant mice at doses up to 20 mg/kg/day (60 mg/m2 /day, 0.4 times the recommended maximum human dose based on body surface area), pregnant rats at doses up to 10 mg/kg/day (60 mg/m2 /day, 0.4 times the recommended maximum human dose based on body surface area) and pregnant rabbits at doses up to 10 mg/kg/day (120 mg/m2 /day, 0.8 times the recommended maximum human dose based on body surface area), there was no evidence of teratogenicity.

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