Ascomp with Codeine (Page 7 of 11)

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Infertility

Chronic use of opioids may cause reduced fertility in females and males of reproductive potential. It is not known whether these effects on fertility are reversible [see Adverse Reactions (6.2), Clinical Pharmacology (12.2), Nonclincical Toxicology (13.1)].

Females

Based on the mechanism of action, the use of prostaglandin-mediated NSAIDs, including aspirin, may delay or prevent rupture of ovarian follicles, which has been associated with reversible infertility in some women. Published animal studies have shown that administration of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors has the potential to disrupt prostaglandin-mediated follicular rupture required for ovulation. Small studies in women treated with NSAIDs have also shown a reversible delay in ovulation. Consider withdrawal of NSAIDs, including aspirin, in women who have difficulties conceiving or who are undergoing investigation of infertility.

8.4 Pediatric Use

Preparations containing aspirin should be kept out of the reach of children. Reye’s Syndrome is a rare condition that affects the brain and liver and is most often observed in children given aspirin during a viral illness. Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

The safety and effectiveness of ASCOMP with CODEINE in pediatric patients have not been established.

Life-threatening respiratory depression and death have occurred in children who received codeine [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)]. In most of the reported cases, these events followed tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, and many of the children had evidence of being ultra-rapid metabolizers of codeine (i.e., multiple copies of the gene for cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 2D6 or high morphine concentrations). Children with sleep apnea may be particularly sensitive to the respiratory depressant effects of codeine. Because of the risk of life-threatening respiratory depression and death:

ASCOMP with CODEINE is contraindicated for all children younger than 12 years of age [see Contraindications (4)].
ASCOMP with CODEINE is contraindicated for post-operative management in pediatric patients younger than 18 years of age following tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy [see Contraindications (4)].
Avoid the use of ASCOMP with CODEINE in adolescents 12 to 18 years of age who have other risk factors that may increase their sensitivity to the respiratory depressant effects of codeine unless the benefits outweigh the risks. Risk factors include conditions associated with hypoventilation, such as postoperative status, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity, severe pulmonary disease, neuromuscular disease, and concomitant use of other medications that cause respiratory depression. [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)].

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of Butalbital, Aspirin, Caffeine, and Codeine Phosphate, USP Capsules did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

Butalbital is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function.

Elderly patients (aged 65 years or older) may have increased sensitivity to ASCOMP with CODEINE. In general, use caution when selecting a dosage for an elderly patient, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

Respiratory depression is the chief risk for elderly patients treated with opioids and has occurred after large initial doses were administered to patients who were not opioid-tolerant or when opioids were co-administered with other agents that depress respiration. Titrate the dosage of ASCOMP with CODEINE slowly in geriatric patients and monitor closely for signs of central nervous system and respiratory depression [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)].

Components of this product are known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of adverse reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function.

Elderly patients, compared to younger patients, are at greater risk for NSAID-associated serious cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and/or renal adverse reactions. If the anticipated benefit for the elderly patient outweighs these potential risks, dose selection should start at the low end of the dosing range, and monitor patients for adverse effects [see Warnings and Precautions (5)].

8.6 Hepatic Impairment

No formal studies have been conducted in patients with hepatic impairment so the pharmacokinetics of aspirin, codeine and butalbital in this patient population are unknown. Start these patients cautiously with lower doses of ASCOMP with CODEINE or with longer dosing intervals and titrate slowly while carefully monitoring for side effects. In patients with severe hepatic disease, monitor effects of therapy with serial liver function tests.

8.7 Renal Impairment

ASCOMP with CODEINE contains aspirin, which should be avoided in patients with severe renal failure (glomerular filtration rate less than 10 mL/minute).

Codeine pharmacokinetics may be altered in patients with renal failure. Clearance may be decreased, and the metabolites may accumulate to much higher plasma levels in patients with renal failure as compared to patients with normal renal function. Start these patients cautiously with lower doses of ASCOMP with CODEINE or with longer dosing intervals and titrate slowly while carefully monitoring for side effects. In patients with renal disease, monitor effects of therapy with serial renal function tests.

9 DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

9.1 Controlled Substance

ASCOMP with CODEINE contains codeine. Codeine in combination with butalbital, aspirin, and caffeine is a Schedule III controlled substance.

9.2 Abuse

ASCOMP with CODEINE contains codeine, a substance with a high potential for abuse similar to other opioids, including fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and tapentadol. ASCOMP with CODEINE can be abused and is subject to misuse, addiction, and criminal diversion [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

All patients treated with opioids require careful monitoring for signs of abuse and addiction, because use of opioid analgesic products carries the risk of addiction even under appropriate medical use.

Prescription drug abuse is the intentional non-therapeutic use of a prescription drug, even once, for its rewarding psychological or physiological effects.

Drug addiction is a cluster of behavioral, cognitive, and physiological phenomena that develop after repeated substance use and includes: a strong desire to take the drug, difficulties in controlling its use, persisting in its use despite harmful consequences, a higher priority given to drug use than to other activities and obligations, increased tolerance, and sometimes a physical withdrawal.

“Drug-seeking” behavior is very common in persons with substance use disorders. Drug-seeking tactics include emergency calls or visits near the end of office hours, refusal to undergo appropriate examination, testing, or referral, repeated “loss” of prescriptions, tampering with prescriptions, and reluctance to provide prior medical records or contact information for other treating healthcare provider(s). “Doctor shopping” (visiting multiple prescribers to obtain additional prescriptions) is common among drug abusers and people suffering from untreated addiction. Preoccupation with achieving adequate pain relief can be appropriate behavior in a patient with poor pain control.

Abuse and addiction are separate and distinct from physical dependence and tolerance. Healthcare providers should be aware that addiction may not be accompanied by concurrent tolerance and symptoms of physical dependence in all addicts. In addition, abuse of opioids can occur in the absence of true addiction.

ASCOMP with CODEINE, like other opioids, can be diverted for non-medical use into illicit channels of distribution. Careful record-keeping of prescribing information, including quantity, frequency, and renewal requests, as required by state and federal law, is strongly advised.

Proper assessment of the patient, proper prescribing practices, periodic re-evaluation of therapy, and proper dispensing and storage are appropriate measures that help to limit abuse of opioid drugs.

Risks Specific to Abuse of ASCOMP with CODEINE

ASCOMP with CODEINE is for oral use only. Abuse of ASCOMP with CODEINE poses a risk of overdose and death. The risk is increased with concurrent abuse of ASCOMP with CODEINE with alcohol and other central nervous system depressants.

Parenteral drug abuse is commonly associated with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis and HIV.

Butalbital

Barbiturates may be habit-forming. Tolerance, psychological dependence, and physical dependence may occur especially following prolonged use of high doses of barbiturates. The average daily dose for the barbiturate addict is usually about 1,500 mg. As tolerance to barbiturates develops, the amount needed to maintain the same level of intoxication increases; tolerance to a fatal dosage, however, does not increase more than twofold. As this occurs, the margin between an intoxication dosage and fatal dosage becomes smaller. The lethal dose of a barbiturate is far less if alcohol is also ingested. Major withdrawal symptoms (convulsions and delirium) may occur within 16 hours and last up to 5 days after abrupt cessation of these drugs. Intensity of withdrawal symptoms gradually declines over a period of approximately 15 days. Treatment of barbiturate dependence consists of cautious and gradual withdrawal of the drug. Barbiturate-dependent patients can be withdrawn by using a number of different withdrawal regimens. One method involves initiating treatment at the patient’s regular dosage level and gradually decreasing the daily dosage as tolerated by the patient.

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