Atomoxetine Hydrochloride (Page 2 of 8)

5.2 Severe Liver Injury

Postmarketing reports indicate that atomoxetine hydrochloride can cause severe liver injury. Although no evidence of liver injury was detected in clinical trials of about 6000 patients, there have been rare cases of clinically significant liver injury that were considered probably or possibly related to atomoxetine hydrochloride use in postmarketing experience. Because of probable underreporting, it is impossible to provide an accurate estimate of the true incidence of these reactions. Reported cases of liver injury occurred within 120 days of initiation of atomoxetine in the majority of cases and some patients presented with markedly elevated liver enzymes [>20 X upper limit of normal (ULN)], and jaundice with significantly elevated bilirubin levels (>2 X ULN), followed by recovery upon atomoxetine discontinuation. In one patient, liver injury, manifested by elevated hepatic enzymes up to 40 X ULN and jaundice with bilirubin up to 12 X ULN, recurred upon rechallenge, and was followed by recovery upon drug discontinuation, providing evidence that atomoxetine hydrochloride likely caused the liver injury. Such reactions may occur several months after therapy is started, but laboratory abnormalities may continue to worsen for several weeks after drug is stopped. The patient described above recovered from his liver injury, and did not require a liver transplant. However, severe liver injury due to any drug may potentially progress to acute liver failure resulting in death or the need for a liver transplant.

5.12
); Patient Counseling Information (17.3)].

5.3 Serious Cardiovascular Events

Sudden Death and Preexisting Structural Cardiac Abnormalities or Other Serious Heart Problems

Children and Adolescents — Sudden death has been reported in association with atomoxetine treatment at usual doses in children and adolescents with structural cardiac abnormalities or other serious heart problems. Although some serious heart problems alone carry an increased risk of sudden death, atomoxetine generally should not be used in children or adolescents with known serious structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart rhythm abnormalities, or other serious cardiac problems that may place them at increased vulnerability to the noradrenergic effects of atomoxetine.

Adults — Sudden deaths, stroke, and myocardial infarction have been reported in adults taking atomoxetine at usual doses for ADHD. Although the role of atomoxetine in these adult cases is also unknown, adults have a greater likelihood than children of having serious structural cardiac abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, serious heart rhythm abnormalities, coronary artery disease, or other serious cardiac problems. Consideration should be given to not treating adults with clinically significant cardiac abnormalities.

Assessing Cardiovascular Status in Patients being Treated with Atomoxetine

5.4 Effects on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate

Atomoxetine hydrochloride should be used with caution in patients with hypertension, tachycardia, or cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease because it can increase blood pressure and heart rate. Pulse and blood pressure should be measured at baseline, following atomoxetine hydrochloride dose increases, and periodically while on therapy.

In pediatric placebo-controlled trials, atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated subjects experienced a mean increase in heart rate of about 6 beats/minute compared with placebo subjects. At the final study visit before drug discontinuation, 2.5% (36/1434) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated subjects had heart rate increases of at least 25 beats/minute and a heart rate of at least 110 beats/minute, compared with 0.2% (2/850) of placebo subjects. There were 1.1% (15/1417) pediatric atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated subjects with a heart rate increase of at least 25 beats/minute and a heart rate of at least 110 beats/minute on more than one occasion. Tachycardia was identified as an adverse event for 0.3% (5/1597) of these pediatric subjects compared with 0% (0/934) of placebo subjects. The mean heart rate increase in extensive metabolizer (EM) patients was 5 beats/minute, and in poor metabolizer (PM) patients 9.4 beats/minute.

Atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated pediatric subjects experienced mean increases of about 1.6 and 2.4 mm Hg in systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respectively compared with placebo. At the final study visit before drug discontinuation, 4.8% (59/1226) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated pediatric subjects had high systolic blood pressure measurements compared with 3.5% (26/748) of placebo subjects. High systolic blood pressures were measured on 2 or more occasions in 4.4% (54/1226) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated subjects and 1.9% (14/748) of placebo subjects. At the final study visit before drug discontinuation, 4% (50/1262) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated pediatric subjects had high diastolic blood pressure measurements compared with 1.1% (8/759) of placebo subjects. High diastolic blood pressures were measured on 2 or more occasions in 3.5% (44/1262) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated subjects and 0.5% (4/759) of placebo subjects. (High systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements were defined as those exceeding the 95th percentile, stratified by age, gender, and height percentile — National High Blood Pressure Education Working Group on Hypertension Control in Children and Adolescents.)

In adult placebo-controlled trials, atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated subjects experienced a mean increase in heart rate of 5 beats/minute compared with placebo subjects. Tachycardia was identified as an adverse event for 1.5% (8/540) of these adult atomoxetine subjects compared with 0.5% (2/402) of placebo subjects.

Atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated adult subjects experienced mean increases in systolic (about 2 mm Hg) and diastolic (about 1 mm Hg) blood pressures compared with placebo. At the final study visit before drug discontinuation, 2.2% (11/510) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated adult subjects had systolic blood pressure measurements ≥150 mm Hg compared with 1% (4/393) of placebo subjects. At the final study visit before drug discontinuation, 0.4% (2/510) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated adult subjects had diastolic blood pressure measurements ≥100 mm Hg compared with 0.5% (2/393) of placebo subjects. No adult subject had a high systolic or diastolic blood pressure detected on more than one occasion.

Orthostatic hypotension and syncope have been reported in patients taking atomoxetine hydrochloride. In child and adolescent trials, 0.2% (12/5596) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated patients experienced orthostatic hypotension and 0.8% (46/5596) experienced syncope. In short-term child and adolescent controlled trials, 1.8% (6/340) of atomoxetine hydrochloride-treated patients experienced orthostatic hypotension compared with 0.5% (1/207) of placebo-treated patients. Syncope was not reported during short-term child and adolescent placebo-controlled ADHD trials. Atomoxetine hydrochloride should be used with caution in any condition that may predispose patients to hypotension, or conditions associated with abrupt heart rate or blood pressure changes.

Peripheral vascular effects — There have been spontaneous postmarketing reports of Raynaud’s phenomenon (new onset and exacerbation of preexisting condition).

5.5 Emergence of New Psychotic or Manic Symptoms

Treatment emergent psychotic or manic symptoms, e.g., hallucinations, delusional thinking, or mania in children and adolescents without a prior history of psychotic illness or mania can be caused by atomoxetine at usual doses. If such symptoms occur, consideration should be given to a possible causal role of atomoxetine, and discontinuation of treatment should be considered. In a pooled analysis of multiple short-term, placebo-controlled studies, such symptoms occurred in about 0.2% (4 patients with reactions out of 1939 exposed to atomoxetine for several weeks at usual doses) of atomoxetine-treated patients compared to 0 out of 1056 placebo-treated patients.

5.6 Screening Patients for Bipolar Disorder

In general, particular care should be taken in treating ADHD in patients with comorbid bipolar disorder because of concern for possible induction of a mixed/manic episode in patients at risk for bipolar disorder. Whether any of the symptoms described above represent such a conversion is unknown. However, prior to initiating treatment with atomoxetine hydrochloride, patients with comorbid depressive symptoms should be adequately screened to determine if they are at risk for bipolar disorder; such screening should include a detailed psychiatric history, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression.

5.7 Aggressive Behavior or Hostility

Patients beginning treatment for ADHD should be monitored for the appearance or worsening of aggressive behavior or hostility. Aggressive behavior or hostility is often observed in children and adolescents with ADHD. In short-term controlled clinical trials, 21/1308 (1.6%) of atomoxetine patients versus 9/806 (1.1%) of placebo-treated patients spontaneously reported treatment emergent hostility-related adverse events. Although this is not conclusive evidence that atomoxetine hydrochloride causes aggressive behavior or hostility, these behaviors were more frequently observed in clinical trials among children and adolescents treated with atomoxetine hydrochloride compared to placebo (overall risk ratio of 1.33 [95% C.I. 0.67 to 2.64 -- not statistically significant]).

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