AZELASTINE HYDROCHLORIDE (Page 2 of 4)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

During the post approval use of Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray, the following adverse reactions have been identified. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Adverse reactions reported include: anaphylaxis, application site irritation, atrial fibrillation, chest pain, confusion, dyspnea, facial edema, involuntary muscle contractions, nasal sores, palpitations, paresthesia, parosmia, pruritus, rash, disturbance or loss of sense of smell and/or taste, tolerance, urinary retention, vision abnormal and xerophthalmia.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Central Nervous System Depressants

Concurrent use of Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray with alcohol or other central nervous system depressants should be avoided because reductions in alertness and impairment of central nervous system performance may occur [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1) ].

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Limited data from postmarketing experience over decades of use with Azelastine hydrochloride in pregnant women have not identified any drug associated risks of miscarriage, birth defects, or other adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. In animal reproduction studies, there was no evidence of fetal harm at oral doses approximately 5 times the clinical daily dose. Oral administration of azelastine hydrochloride to pregnant mice, rats, and rabbits, during the period of organogenesis, produced developmental toxicity that included structural abnormalities, decreased embryo-fetal survival, and decreased fetal body weights at doses 270 times and higher than the maximum recommended human daily intranasal dose (MRHDID) of 1.096 mg. However, the relevance of these findings in animals to pregnant women was considered questionable based upon the high animal to human dose multiple.

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

In an embryo-fetal development study in mice dosed during the period of organogenesis, azelastine hydrochloride caused embryo-fetal death, structural abnormalities (cleft palate; short or absent tail; fused, absent or branched ribs), delayed ossification, and decreased fetal weight at approximately 300 times the maximum recommended human daily intranasal dose (MRHDID) in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal oral dose of 68.6 mg/kg/day), which also caused maternal toxicity as evidenced by decreased maternal body weight. Neither fetal nor maternal effects occurred in mice at approximately 15 times the MRHDID in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal oral dose of 3 mg/kg/day).

In an embryo-fetal development study in pregnant rats dosed during the period of organogenesis from gestation days 7 to 17, azelastine hydrochloride caused structural abnormalities (oligo-and brachydactylia), delayed ossification, and skeletal variations, in the absence of maternal toxicity, at approximately 270 times the MRHDID in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal oral dose of 30 mg/kg/day). Azelastine hydrochloride caused embryo-fetal death and decreased fetal weight and severe maternal toxicity at approximately 610 times the MRHDID (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal oral dose of 68.6 mg/kg/day). Neither fetal nor maternal effects occurred at approximately 20 times the MRHDID (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal oral dose of 2 mg/kg/day).

In an embryo-fetal development study in pregnant rabbits dosed during the period of organogenesis from gestation days 6 to 18, azelastine hydrochloride caused abortion, delayed ossification and decreased fetal weight and severe maternal toxicity at approximately 530 times the MRHDID in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal oral dose of 30 mg/kg/day). Neither fetal nor maternal effects occurred at approximately 5 times the MRHDID (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal oral dose of 0.3 mg/kg/day).

In a prenatal and postnatal development study in pregnant rats dosed from late in the gestation period and through the lactation period from gestation day 17 through lactation day 21, azelastine hydrochloride produced no adverse developmental effects on pups at maternal doses up to approximately 270 times the MRHDID (on mg/m2 basis at a maternal dose of 30 mg/kg/day).

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data on the presence of azelastine hydrochloride in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Breastfed infants should be monitored for signs of milk rejection during Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray use by lactating women (see Clinical Considerations). The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray or from the underlying maternal condition.

Clinical Considerations

Monitoring for Adverse Reactions

Breastfed infants of lactating women treated with Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray should be monitored for possible signs of milk rejection related to the bitter taste of azelastine hydrochloride.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray for the treatment of symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis have been established for patients 5 years and older [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) and Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The safety and effectiveness of Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray for the treatment of vasomotor rhinitis have been established for patients 12 years and older [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) and Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The safety and effectiveness of Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray in pediatric patients below the age of 5 years with seasonal allergic rhinitis and in pediatric patients below the age of 12 years with vasomotor rhinitis have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical trials of Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

10 OVERDOSAGE

There have been no reported overdosages with Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray. Acute overdosage by adults with this dosage form is unlikely to result in clinically significant adverse reactions, other than increased somnolence, since one bottle of Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray contains 30 mg of azelastine hydrochloride. Clinical trials in adults with single doses of the oral formulation of azelastine hydrochloride (up to 16 mg) have not resulted in increased incidence of serious adverse reactions. General supportive measures should be employed if overdosage occurs. There is no known antidote to Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray. Oral ingestion of antihistamines has the potential to cause serious adverse effects in young children. Accordingly, Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray should be kept out of the reach of children.

11 DESCRIPTION

Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray, 0.1% (137 micrograms (mcg) per spray), is an antihistamine formulated as a metered-spray solution for intranasal administration. Azelastine hydrochloride occurs as a white, almost odorless, crystalline powder with a bitter taste. It has a molecular weight of 418.37. It is sparingly soluble in water, methanol, and propylene glycol and slightly soluble in ethanol, octanol, and glycerine. It has a melting point of about 225°C and the pH of a saturated solution is between 5.0 and 5.4. Its chemical name is (±)-1-(2H)-phthalazinone, 4-[(4-chlorophenyl) methyl]-2-(hexahydro-1-methyl-1H-azepin-4-yl)-, monohydrochloride. Its molecular formula is C22 H24 ClN3 O∙HCl with the following chemical structure:

Chemical Structure
(click image for full-size original)

Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray contains 0.1% azelastine hydrochloride in an aqueous solution at pH 6.8 ± 0.3. It also contains benzalkonium chloride (125 mcg/mL), edetate disodium, hypromellose, citric acid, dibasic sodium phosphate heptahydrate, sodium chloride, and purified water.

After priming [see Dosage and Administration (2.3) ], each metered spray delivers a 0.137 mL mean volume containing 137 mcg of azelastine hydrochloride (equivalent to 125 mcg of azelastine base). The bottle can deliver 200 metered sprays.

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