Azithromycin (Page 4 of 9)

6.3 Laboratory Abnormalities

Adults:

Clinically significant abnormalities (irrespective of drug relationship) occurring during the clinical trials were reported as follows: with an incidence of greater than 1%: decreased hemoglobin, hematocrit, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and blood glucose; elevated serum creatine phosphokinase, potassium, ALT, GGT, AST, BUN, creatinine, blood glucose, platelet count, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils; with an incidence of less than 1%: leukopenia, neutropenia, decreased sodium, potassium, platelet count, elevated monocytes, basophils, bicarbonate, serum alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, LDH, and phosphate. The majority of subjects with elevated serum creatinine also had abnormal values at baseline. When follow-up was provided, changes in laboratory tests appeared to be reversible.

In multiple-dose clinical trials involving more than 5000 patients, four patients discontinued therapy because of treatment-related liver enzyme abnormalities and one because of a renal function abnormality.

Pediatric Patients:

One, Three, and Five Day Regimens

Laboratory data collected from comparative clinical trials employing two 3 day regimens (30 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg in divided doses over 3 days), or two 5 day regimens (30 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg in divided doses over 5 days) were similar for regimens of azithromycin and all comparators combined, with most clinically significant laboratory abnormalities occurring at incidences of 1 to 5%. Laboratory data for patients receiving 30 mg/kg as a single dose were collected in one single center trial. In that trial, an absolute neutrophil count between 500 to 1500 cells/mm 3 was observed in 10/64 patients receiving 30 mg/kg as a single dose, 9/62 patients receiving 30 mg/kg given over 3 days, and 8/63 comparator patients. No patient had an absolute neutrophil count < 500 cells/mm 3 . In multiple-dose clinical trials involving approximately 4700 pediatric patients, no patients discontinued therapy because of treatment-related laboratory abnormalities.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Nelfinavir

Coadministration of nelfinavir at steady-state with a single oral dose of azithromycin resulted in increased azithromycin serum concentrations. Although a dose adjustment of azithromycin is not recommended when administered in combination with nelfinavir, close monitoring for known adverse reactions of azithromycin, such as liver enzyme abnormalities and hearing impairment, is warranted [see Adverse Reactions ( 6)].

7.2 Warfarin

Spontaneous postmarketing reports suggest that concomitant administration of azithromycin may potentiate the effects of oral anticoagulants such as warfarin, although the prothrombin time was not affected in the dedicated drug interaction study with azithromycin and warfarin. Prothrombin times should be carefully monitored while patients are receiving azithromycin and oral anticoagulants concomitantly.

7.3 Potential Drug-Drug Interactions with Macrolides

Interactions with digoxin or phenytoin have not been reported in clinical trials with azithromycin; however, no specific drug interaction studies have been performed to evaluate potential drug-drug interactions. However, drug interactions have been observed with other macrolide products. Until further data are developed regarding drug interactions when digoxin or phenytoin are used concomitantly with azithromycin careful monitoring of patients is advised.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category B

Reproduction studies have been performed in rats and mice at doses up to moderately maternally toxic dose concentrations (i.e., 200 mg/kg/day). These daily doses in rats and mice, based on body surface area, are estimated to be 4 and 2 times, respectively, an adult daily dose of 500 mg. In the animal studies, no evidence of harm to the fetus due to azithromycin was found. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, azithromycin should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

8.3 Nursing Mothers

Azithromycin has been reported to be excreted in human breast milk in small amounts. Caution should be exercised when azithromycin is administered to a nursing woman.

8.4 Pediatric Use

[see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3), Indications and Usage ( 1.2), and Dosage and Administration ( 2.2)]

Safety and effectiveness in the treatment of pediatric patients with acute otitis media, acute bacterial sinusitis and community-acquired pneumonia under 6 months of age have not been established. Use of azithromycin for the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis and community-acquired pneumonia in pediatric patients (6 months of age or greater) is supported by adequate and well-controlled trials in adults

Pharyngitis/Tonsillitis: Safety and effectiveness in the treatment of pediatric patients with pharyngitis/tonsillitis under 2 years of age have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

In multiple-dose clinical trials of oral azithromycin, 9% of patients were at least 65 years of age (458/4949) and 3% of patients (144/4949) were at least 75 years of age. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in response between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

Elderly patients may be more susceptible to development of torsades de pointes arrhythmias than younger patients. [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ( 5.3)] .

10 OVERDOSAGE

Adverse reactions experienced at higher than recommended doses were similar to those seen at normal doses particularly nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. In the event of overdosage, general symptomatic and supportive measures are indicated as required.

11 DESCRIPTION

Azithromycin for oral suspension USP contains the active ingredient azithromycin, USP, a macrolide antibacterial drug, for oral administration. Azithromycin, USP has the chemical name (2R,3S,4R,5R,8R, 10R,11R,12S,13S,14R) -13-[(2,6-dideoxy-3- C -methyl-3- O -methyl-α- L-ribo- hexopyranosyl) oxy]-2-ethyl-3,4,10-trihydroxy-3,5,6,8,10,12,14-heptamethyl-11-[[3,4,6-trideoxy-3- (dimethylamino)-β- D-xylo -hexopyranosyl]oxy]-1-oxa-6-azacyclopentadecan-15-one. Azithromycin, USP is derived from erythromycin; however, it differs chemically from erythromycin in that a methyl-substituted nitrogen atom is incorporated into the lactone ring.

Azithromycin, USP has the following structural formula:

Structure
(click image for full-size original)

C 38 H 72 N 2 O 12 M.W. 749.0

Azithromycin, USP, as the monohydrate, is a white crystalline powder with a molecular formula of C 38 H 72 N 2 O 12 •H 2 O and a molecular weight of 767.0.

Azithromycin for oral suspension USP is supplied in bottles containing azithromycin monohydrate powder equivalent to 300 mg, 600 mg, 900 mg or 1200 mg azithromycin, USP per bottle and the following inactive ingredients: ammonio methacrylate copolymer, banana flavor, cherry flavor, colloidal silicon dioxide, FD&C Red No. 40, hydroxypropyl cellulose, sucrose, tribasic sodium phosphate anhydrous, vanilla flavor, and xanthan gum. After constitution, each 5 mL of suspension contains 100 mg or 200 mg of azithromycin, USP.

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