Briviact (Page 3 of 8)

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

In all controlled and uncontrolled trials performed in adult epilepsy patients, BRIVIACT was administered as adjunctive therapy to 2437 patients. Of these patients, 1929 were treated for at least 6 months, 1500 for at least 12 months, 1056 for at least 24 months, and 758 for at least 36 months. A total of 1558 patients (1099 patients treated with BRIVIACT and 459 patients treated with placebo) constituted the safety population in the pooled analysis of Phase 3 placebo-controlled studies in patients with partial-onset seizures (Studies 1, 2, and 3) [see Clinical Studies (14)]. The adverse reactions presented in Table 4 are based on this safety population; the median length of treatment in these studies was 12 weeks. Of the patients in those studies, approximately 51% were male, 74% were Caucasian, and the mean age was 38 years.

In the Phase 3 controlled epilepsy studies, adverse events occurred in 68% of patients treated with BRIVIACT and 62% treated with placebo. The most common adverse reactions occurring at a frequency of at least 5% in patients treated with BRIVIACT doses of at least 50 mg/day and greater than placebo were somnolence and sedation (16%), dizziness (12%), fatigue (9%), and nausea and vomiting symptoms (5%).

The discontinuation rates due to adverse events were 5%, 8%, and 7% for patients randomized to receive BRIVIACT at the recommended doses of 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg/day, respectively, compared to 4% in patients randomized to receive placebo.

Table 4 lists adverse reactions for BRIVIACT that occurred at least 2% more frequently for BRIVIACT doses of at least 50 mg/day than placebo.

Table 4: Adverse Reactions in Pooled Placebo-Controlled Adjunctive Therapy Studies in Adult Patients with Partial-Onset Seizures (BRIVIACT 50 mg/day, 100 mg/day, and 200 mg/day)
Adverse Reactions BRIVIACT(N=803)% Placebo(N=459)%
*
Cerebellar coordination and balance disturbances includes ataxia, balance disorder, coordination abnormal, and nystagmus.
Gastrointestinal disorders
Nausea/vomiting symptoms 5 3
Constipation 2 0
Nervous system disorders
Somnolence and sedation 16 8
Dizziness 12 7
Fatigue 9 4
Cerebellar coordination and balance disturbances * 3 1
Psychiatric disorders
Irritability 3 1

There was no apparent dose-dependent increase in adverse reactions listed in Table 4 with the exception of somnolence and sedation.

Pediatric Patients

Safety of BRIVIACT was evaluated in two open-label, safety and pharmacokinetic trials in pediatric patients 2 months to less than 16 years of age. Across studies of pediatric patients with partial onset seizures, 186 patients received BRIVIACT oral solution or tablet, of whom 123 received BRIVIACT for at least 12 months. Adverse reactions reported in clinical studies of pediatric patients were generally similar to those seen in adult patients. Decreased appetite was also observed in these pediatric trials.

Hematologic Abnormalities

BRIVIACT can cause hematologic abnormalities. In the Phase 3 controlled adjunctive epilepsy studies, a total of 1.8% of BRIVIACT-treated patients and 1.1% of placebo-treated patients had at least one clinically significant decreased white blood cell count (<3.0 × 109 /L), and 0.3% of BRIVIACT-treated patients and 0% of placebo-treated patients had at least one clinically significant decreased neutrophil count (<1.0 × 109 /L).

Adverse Reactions with BRIVIACT Injection

Adverse reactions with BRIVIACT injection administered to adults and pediatric patients 2 months to 16 years of age were generally similar to those observed with BRIVIACT tablets. Other adverse events that occurred in at least 3% of adult patients who received BRIVIACT injection included dysgeusia, euphoric mood, feeling drunk, and infusion site pain.

Comparison by Sex

There were no significant differences by sex in the incidence of adverse reactions.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Rifampin

Co-administration with rifampin decreases BRIVIACT plasma concentrations likely because of CYP2C19 induction [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Prescribers should increase the BRIVIACT dose by up to 100% (i.e., double the dosage) in patients while receiving concomitant treatment with rifampin [see Dosage and Administration (2.6)].

7.2 Carbamazepine

Co-administration with carbamazepine may increase exposure to carbamazepine-epoxide, the active metabolite of carbamazepine. Though available data did not reveal any safety concerns, if tolerability issues arise when co-administered, carbamazepine dose reduction should be considered [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.3 Phenytoin

Because BRIVIACT can increase plasma concentrations of phenytoin, phenytoin levels should be monitored in patients when concomitant BRIVIACT is added to or discontinued from ongoing phenytoin therapy [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

7.4 Levetiracetam

BRIVIACT provided no added therapeutic benefit to levetiracetam when the two drugs were co-administered [see Clinical Studies (14)].

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), such as BRIVIACT, during pregnancy. Encourage patients who are taking BRIVIACT during pregnancy to enroll in the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry by calling the toll free number 1-888-233-2334 or visiting http://www.aedpregnancyregistry.org/.

Risk Summary

There are no adequate data on the developmental risks associated with use of BRIVIACT in pregnant women. In animal studies, brivaracetam produced evidence of developmental toxicity (increased embryofetal mortality and decreased fetal body weights in rabbits; decreased growth, delayed sexual maturation, and long-term neurobehavioral changes in rat offspring) at maternal plasma exposures greater than clinical exposures [see Data].

In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively. The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown.

Data

Animal Data

Oral administration of brivaracetam (0, 150, 300, or 600 mg/kg/day) to pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis did not produce any significant maternal or embryofetal toxicity. The highest dose tested was associated with maternal plasma exposures (AUC) approximately 30 times exposures in humans at the maximum recommended dose (MRD) of 200 mg/day.

Oral administration of brivaracetam (0, 30, 60, 120, or 240 mg/kg/day) to pregnant rabbits during the period of organogenesis resulted in embryofetal mortality and decreased fetal body weights at the highest dose tested, which was also maternally toxic. The highest no-effect dose (120 mg/kg/day) was associated with maternal plasma exposures approximately 4 times human exposures at the MRD.

When brivaracetam (0, 150, 300, or 600 mg/kg/day) was orally administered to rats throughout pregnancy and lactation, decreased growth, delayed sexual maturation (female), and long-term neurobehavioral changes were observed in the offspring at the highest dose. The highest no-effect dose (300 mg/kg/day) was associated with maternal plasma exposures approximately 7 times human exposures at the MRD.

Brivaracetam was shown to readily cross the placenta in pregnant rats after a single oral (5 mg/kg) dose of 14 C-brivaracetam. From 1 hour post dose, radioactivity levels in fetuses, amniotic fluid, and placenta were similar to those measured in maternal blood.

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