Ciprofloxacin (Page 8 of 13)

8.5 Geriatric Use

Geriatric patients are at increased risk for developing severe tendon disorders including tendon rupture when being treated with a fluoroquinolone such as ciprofloxacin. This risk is further increased in patients receiving concomitant corticosteroid therapy. Tendinitis or tendon rupture can involve the Achilles, hand, shoulder, or other tendon sites and can occur during or after completion of therapy; cases occurring up to several months after fluoroquinolone treatment have been reported. Caution should be used when prescribing ciprofloxacin to elderly patients especially those on corticosteroids. Patients should be informed of this potential adverse reaction and advised to discontinue ciprofloxacin and contact their healthcare provider if any symptoms of tendinitis or tendon rupture occur [see Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions (5.2), and Adverse Reactions (6.2)].

Epidemiologic studies report an increased rate of aortic aneurysm and dissection within two months following use of fluoroquinolones, particularly in elderly patients [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.9)].

In a retrospective analysis of 23 multiple-dose controlled clinical trials of ciprofloxacin encompassing over 3500 ciprofloxacin-treated patients, 25% of patients were greater than or equal to 65 years of age and 10% were greater than or equal to 75 years of age. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals on any drug therapy cannot be ruled out. Ciprofloxacin is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of adverse reactions may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. No alteration of dosage is necessary for patients greater than 65 years of age with normal renal function. However, since some older individuals experience reduced renal function by virtue of their advanced age, care should be taken in dose selection for elderly patients, and renal function monitoring may be useful in these patients [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.3) and Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)].

In general, elderly patients may be more susceptible to drug-associated effects on the QT interval. Therefore, precaution should be taken when using ciprofloxacin with concomitant drugs that can result in prolongation of the QT interval (for example, class IA or class III antiarrhythmics) or in patients with risk factors for torsade de pointes (for example, known QT prolongation, uncorrected hypokalemia) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)].

8.6 Renal Impairment

Ciprofloxacin is eliminated primarily by renal excretion; however, the drug is also metabolized and partially cleared through the biliary system of the liver and through the intestine. These alternative pathways of drug elimination appear to compensate for the reduced renal excretion in patients with renal impairment. Nonetheless, some modification of dosage is recommended, particularly for patients with severe renal dysfunction [see Dosage and Administration (2.3)and Clinical Pharmcology (12.3)].

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

In preliminary studies in patients with stable chronic liver cirrhosis, no significant changes in ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics have been observed. The pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in patients with acute hepatic insufficiency, have not been studied.

10 OVERDOSAGE

In the event of acute overdosage, reversible renal toxicity has been reported in some cases. Empty the stomach by inducing vomiting or by gastric lavage. Observe the patient carefully and give supportive treatment, including monitoring of renal function, urinary pH and acidify, if required, to prevent crystalluria and administration of magnesium, aluminum, or calcium containing antacids which can reduce the absorption of ciprofloxacin. Adequate hydration must be maintained. Only a small amount of ciprofloxacin (less than 10%) is removed from the body after hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

11 DESCRIPTION

Ciprofloxacin tablets USP are synthetic antimicrobial agents for oral administration. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, USP, a fluoroquinolone, is the monohydrochloride monohydratesalt of 1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1, 4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid.It is a faintly yellowish to light yellow crystalline substance with a molecular weight of 385.8. Its molecular formula is C17 H18 FN3 O3 •HCl•H2 O and its chemical structure is as follows:
structure1

Ciprofloxacin film-coated tablets are available in 100 mg, 250 mg, 500 mg and 750 strengths. Each ciprofloxacin film-coated tablet contains 100 mg (equivalent to 116.4 mg ciprofloxacin hydrochloride monohydrate) or 250 mg (equivalent to 291 mg ciprofloxacin hydrochloride monohydrate) or 500 mg of ciprofloxacin (equivalent to 582 mg ciprofloxacin hydrochloride monohydrate) or 750 mg of ciprofloxacin (equivalent to 873 mg ciprofloxacin hydrochloride monohydrate). Ciprofloxacin tablets are white. The inactive ingredients are colloidal silicon dioxide, corn starch, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol 400, sodium starch glycolate, and titanium dioxide.

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

Ciprofloxacin is a member of the fluoroquinolone class of antibacterial agents [see Microbiology (12.4)].

12.3 Pharmacokinetics

Absorption
The absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin when given as an oral tablet is approximately 70% with no substantial loss by first pass metabolism. Ciprofloxacin maximum serum concentrations (Cmax ) and area under the curve (AUC) are shown in the chart for the 250 mg to 1,000 mg dose range (Table 12).

Table 12: Ciprofloxacin Cmax and AUC Following Administration of Single Doses of Ciprofloxacin Tablets to Healthy Subjects

Dose (mg) Cmax (mcg/mL) AUC (mcg•hr/mL)
250 1.2 4.8
500 2.4 11.6
750 4.3 20.2
1,00 5.4 30.8

Maximum serum concentrations are attained 1 to 2 hours after oral dosing. Mean concentrations 12 hours after dosing with 250, 500, or 750 mg are 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mcg/mL, respectively. The serum elimination half-life in subjects with normal renal function is approximately 4 hours. Serum concentrations increase proportionately with doses up to 1,000 mg.

A 500 mg oral dose given every 12 hours has been shown to produce an AUC equivalent to that produced by an intravenous infusion of 400 mg ciprofloxacin given over 60 minutes every 12 hours. A 750 mg oral dose given every 12 hours has been shown to produce an AUC at steady-state equivalent to that produced by an intravenous infusion of 400 mg given over 60 minutes every 8 hours. A 750 mg oral dose results in a Cmax similar to that observed with a 400 mg intravenous dose (Table 13). A 250 mg oral dose given every 12 hours produces an AUC equivalent to that produced by an infusion of 200 mg ciprofloxacin given every 12 hours.

Table 13: Steady-state Pharmacokinetic Parameters Following Multiple Oral and Intravenous Doses (Adults)

*: AUC 0–12h x 2 **: AUC 0–8h x 3
Parameters 500 mg 400 mg 750 mg 400 mg
every 12 hours, orally every 12 hours, intravenously every 12 hours, orally every 8 hours intravenously
AUC0-24h,ss (mcg•h/mL) 27.4* 25.4* 31.6* 32.9**
Cmax (mcg/mL) 2.97 4.56 3.59 4.07

Food

When ciprofloxacin tablet is given concomitantly with food, there is a delay in the absorption of the drug, resulting in peak concentrations that occur closer to 2 hours after dosing rather than 1 hour. The overall absorption of ciprofloxacin tablet, however, is not substantially affected. Avoid concomitant administration of ciprofloxacin with dairy products (like milk or yogurt) or calcium-fortified juices alone since decreased absorption is possible; however, ciprofloxacin may be taken with a meal that contains these products.

With oral administration, a 500 mg dose, given as 10 mL of the 5% ciprofloxacin suspension (containing 250 mg ciprofloxacin/5 mL) is bioequivalent to the 500 mg tablet. A 10 mL volume of the 5% ciprofloxacin suspension (containing 250 mg ciprofloxacin/5 mL) is bioequivalent to a 5 mL volume of the 10% ciprofloxacin suspension (containing 500 mg ciprofloxacin/5 mL).

Distribution

The binding of ciprofloxacin to serum proteins is 20% to 40% which is not likely to be high enough to cause significant protein binding interactions with other drugs.
After oral administration, ciprofloxacin is widely distributed throughout the body. Tissue concentrations often exceed serum concentrations in both men and women, particularly in genital tissue including the prostate. Ciprofloxacin is present in active form in the saliva, nasal and bronchial secretions, mucosa of the sinuses, sputum, skin blister fluid, lymph, peritoneal fluid, bile, and prostatic secretions. Ciprofloxacin has also been detected in lung, skin, fat, muscle, cartilage, and bone. The drug diffuses into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); however, CSF concentrations are generally less than 10% of peak serum concentrations. Low levels of the drug have been detected in the aqueous and vitreous humors of the eye.

Metabolism

Four metabolites have been identified in human urine which together account for approximately 15% of an oral dose. The metabolites have antimicrobial activity, but are less active than unchanged ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin is an inhibitor of human cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) mediated metabolism. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin with other drugs primarily metabolized by CYP1A2 results in increased plasma concentrations of these drugs and could lead to clinically significant adverse events of the co-administered drug [see Contraindications (4.2), Warnings and Precautions (5.10, 5.16), and Drug Interactions (7)].


Excretion

The serum elimination half-life in subjects with normal renal function is approximately 4 hours. Approximately 40 to 50% of an orally administered dose is excreted in the urine as unchanged drug. After a 250 mg oral dose, urine concentrations of ciprofloxacin usually exceed 200 mcg/mL during the first two hours and are approximately 30 mcg/mL at 8 to 12 hours after dosing. The urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin is virtually complete within 24 hours after dosing. The renal clearance of ciprofloxacin, which is approximately 300 mL/minute, exceeds the normal glomerular filtration rate of 120 mL/minute. Thus, active tubular secretion would seem to play a significant role in its elimination. Co-administration of probenecid with ciprofloxacin results in about a 50% reduction in the ciprofloxacin renal clearance and a 50% increase in its concentration in the systemic circulation.
Although bile concentrations of ciprofloxacin are several fold higher than serum concentrations after oral dosing, only a small amount of the dose administered is recovered from the bile as unchanged drug. An additional 1% to 2% of the dose is recovered from the bile in the form of metabolites. Approximately 20% to 35% of an oral dose is recovered from the feces within 5 days after dosing. This may arise from either biliary clearance or transintestinal elimination.

Specific Populations

Elderly

Pharmacokinetic studies of the oral (single dose) and intravenous (single and multiple dose) forms of ciprofloxacin indicate that plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin are higher in elderly subjects (older than 65 years) as compared to young adults. Although the Cmax is increased 16% to 40%, the increase in mean AUC is approximately 30%, and can be at least partially attributed to decreased renal clearance in the elderly. Elimination half-life is only slightly (~20%) prolonged in the elderly. These differences are not considered clinically significant [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.5)].

Renal Impairment

In patients with reduced renal function, the half-life of ciprofloxacin is slightly prolonged. Dosage adjustments may be required [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Dosage and Administration (2.3)].

Hepatic Impairment

In preliminary studies in patients with stable chronic liver cirrhosis, no significant changes in ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics have been observed. The kinetics of ciprofloxacin in patients with acute hepatic insufficiency, have not been fully studied.

Pediatrics
Table 14 summarizes pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric patients aged less than 1 to less than 12 years of age receiving intravenous treatment.

Table 14: Estimated AUC0–24,ss and Cmax,ss for Intravenous Treatment (1-h infusion) in Pediatric Patients Following a Multiple Dosing Regimen of 10 mg/kg, Three Times Daily

Age AUC0–24,ss (mg h/L) Cmax,ss (mg/L)
Less than1 year 30.9* 2.8*
1 to less than 2 years 27.8* 3.6*
2 to less than 6 years 28.9* 2.7*
6 to less than 12 years 20.4* 2.0*

* 3 x AUC0–8, ss

These values are within the range reported for adults at therapeutic doses. Based on population pharmacokinetic analysis of pediatric patients with various infections, the predicted mean half-life in children is approximately 4 hours to 5 hours, and the bioavailability of the oral suspension is approximately 60%.

Drug-Drug Interactions

Antacids

Concurrent administration of antacids containing magnesium hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide may reduce the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin by as much as 90% [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)and Drug Interactions (7)]

Histamine H2 -receptor antagonists

Histamine H2 -receptor antagonists appear to have no significant effect on the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

Metronidazole

The serum concentrations of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole were not altered when these two drugs were given concomitantly.

Tizanidine

In a pharmacokinetic study, systemic exposure of tizanidine (4 mg single dose) was significantly increased (Cmax 7-fold, AUC 10-fold) when the drug was given concomitantly with ciprofloxacin (500 mg twice a day for 3 days). Concomitant administration of tizanidine and ciprofloxacin is contraindicated due to the potentiation of hypotensive and sedative effects of tizanidine [see Contraindications (4.2) ].

Ropinirole

In a study conducted in 12 patients with Parkinson’s disease who were administered 6 mg ropinirole once daily with 500 mg ciprofloxacin twice-daily, the mean Cmax and mean AUC of ropinirole were increased by 60% and 84%, respectively. Monitoring for ropinirole-related adverse reactions and appropriate dose adjustment of ropinirole is recommended during and shortly after co-administration with ciprofloxacin [see Warnings and Precautions (5.10)].

Clozapine

Following concomitant administration of 250 mg ciprofloxacin with 304 mg clozapine for 7 days, serum concentrations of clozapine and N-desmethylclozapine were increased by 29% and 31%, respectively. Careful monitoring of clozapine associated adverse reactions and appropriate adjustment of clozapine dosage during and shortly after co-administration with ciprofloxacin are advised.

Sildenafil

Following concomitant administration of a single oral dose of 50 mg sildenafil with 500 mg ciprofloxacin to healthy subjects, the mean Cmax and mean AUC of sildenafil were both increased approximately two-fold. Use sildenafil with caution when co-administered with ciprofloxacin due to the expected two-fold increase in the exposure of sildenafil upon co-administration of ciprofloxacin.

Duloxetine

In clinical studies it was demonstrated that concomitant use of duloxetine with strong inhibitors of the CYP450 1A2 isozyme such as fluvoxamine, may result in a 5-fold increase in mean AUC and a 2.5-fold increase in mean Cmax of duloxetine.

Lidocaine

In a study conducted in 9 healthy volunteers, concomitant use of 1.5 mg/kg IV lidocaine with ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily resulted in an increase of lidocaine Cmax and AUC by 12% and 26%, respectively. Although lidocaine treatment was well tolerated at this elevated exposure, a possible interaction with ciprofloxacin and an increase in adverse reactions related to lidocaine may occur upon concomitant administration.

Metoclopramide

Metoclopramide significantly accelerates the absorption of oral ciprofloxacin resulting in a shorter time to reach maximum plasma concentrations. No significant effect was observed on the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

Omeprazole

When ciprofloxacin was administered as a single 1,000 mg dose concomitantly with omeprazole (40 mg once daily for three days) to 18 healthy volunteers, the mean AUC and Cmax of ciprofloxacin were reduced by 20% and 23%, respectively. The clinical significance of this interaction has not been determined.

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