CISPLATIN

CISPLATIN — cisplatin injection, solution
Gland Pharma Limited

BOXED WARNING

Cisplatin should be administered under the supervision of a qualified physician experienced in the use of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Appropriate management of therapy and complications is possible only when adequate diagnostic and treatment facilities are readily available.
Cumulative renal toxicity associated with cisplatin is severe. Other major dose-related toxicities are myelosuppression, nausea, and vomiting.
Ototoxicity, which may be more pronounced in children, and is manifested by tinnitus, and/or loss of high frequency hearing and occasionally deafness, is significant.Anaphylactic-like reactions to cisplatin have been reported. Facial edema, bronchoconstriction, tachycardia, and hypotension may occur within minutes of cisplatin administration. Epinephrine, corticosteroids, and antihistamines have been effectively employed to alleviate symptoms (see WARNINGS and ADVERSE REACTIONS).
Exercise caution to prevent inadvertent cisplatin overdose. Doses greater than 100 mg/m2 /cycle once every 3 to 4 weeks are rarely used. Care must be taken to avoid inadvertent cisplatin overdose due to confusion with carboplatin or prescribing practices that fail to differentiate daily doses from total dose per cycle.

DESCRIPTION

Cisplatin Injection is a clear, colorless, sterile aqueous solution. Each 100 mL amber vial of Cisplatin Injection contains: 1 mg/mL cisplatin USP, 9 mg/mL sodium chloride, hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide to adjust pH, and water for injection USP to a final volume of 50 mL and 100 mL respectively. The pH range of Cisplatin Injection is 3.8 to 5.9.
Cisplatin Injection must be further diluted prior to administration (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION , All Patients).
The active ingredient, cisplatin USP, is a yellow to orange crystalline powder. Cisplatin is a heavy metal complex containing a central atom of platinum surrounded by two chloride atoms and two ammonia molecules in the cis position. It is soluble in water or saline at 1 mg/mL and in dimethylformamide at 24 mg/mL. It has a melting point of 207°C.

Cispaltinimage01

PtCl2 H6 N2 M.W. 300.05

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Plasma concentrations of the parent compound, cisplatin, decay monoexponentially with a half-life of about 20 to 30 minutes following bolus administrations of 50 or 100 mg/m2 doses. Monoexponential decay and plasma half-lives of about 0.5 hour are also seen following 2 hour or 7 hour infusions of 100 mg/m2. After the latter, the total-body clearances and volumes of distribution at steady-state for cisplatin are about 15 to 16 L/h/m2 and 11 to 12 L/m2.
Due to its unique chemical structure, the chlorine atoms of cisplatin are more subject to chemical displacement reactions by nucleophiles, such as water or sulfhydryl groups, than to enzyme-catalyzed metabolism. At physiological pH in the presence of 0.1M NaCl, the predominant molecular species are cisplatin and monohydroxymonochloro cis -diammine platinum (II) in nearly equal concentrations. The latter, combined with the possible direct displacement of the chlorine atoms by sulfhydryl groups of amino acids or proteins, accounts for the instability of cisplatin in biological matrices. The ratios of cisplatin to total free (ultrafilterable) platinum in the plasma vary considerably between patients and range from 0.5 to 1.1 after a dose of 100 mg/m2.

Cisplatin does not undergo the instantaneous and reversible binding to plasma proteins that is characteristic of normal drug-protein binding. However, the platinum from cisplatin, but not cisplatin itself, becomes bound to several plasma proteins, including albumin, transferrin, and gamma globulin. Three hours after a bolus injection and two hours after the end of a three hour infusion, 90% of the plasma platinum is protein bound. The complexes between albumin and the platinum from cisplatin do not dissociate to a significant extent and are slowly eliminated with a minimum half-life of five days or more.
Following cisplatin doses of 20 to 120 mg/m2 , the concentrations of platinum are highest in liver, prostate, and kidney; somewhat lower in bladder, muscle, testicle, pancreas, and spleen; and lowest in bowel, adrenal, heart, lung, cerebrum, and cerebellum. Platinum is present in tissues for as long as 180 days after the last administration. With the exception of intracerebral tumors, platinum concentrations in tumors are generally somewhat lower than the concentrations in the organ where the tumor is located. Different metastatic sites in the same patient may have different platinum concentrations. Hepatic metastases have the highest platinum concentrations, but these are similar to the platinum concentrations in normal liver. Maximum red blood cell concentrations of platinum are reached within 90 to 150 minutes after a 100 mg/m2 dose of cisplatin and decline in a biphasic manner with a terminal half-life of 36 to 47 days.

Over a dose range of 40 to 140 mg cisplatin/m2 given as a bolus injection or as infusions varying in length from 1 hour to 24 hours, from 10% to about 40% of the administered platinum is excreted in the urine in 24 hours. Over five days following administration of 40 to 100 mg/m2 doses given as rapid, 2 hour to 3 hour, or 6 hour to 8 hour infusions, a mean of 35% to 51% of the dosed platinum is excreted in the urine. Similar mean urinary recoveries of platinum of about 14% to 30% of the dose are found following five daily administrations of 20, 30, or 40 mg/m2 /day. Only a small percentage of the administered platinum is excreted beyond 24 hours post-infusion and most of the platinum excreted in the urine in 24 hours is excreted within the first few hours. Platinum-containing species excreted in the urine are the same as those found following the incubation of cisplatin with urine from healthy subjects, except that the proportions are different.

The parent compound, cisplatin, is excreted in the urine and accounts for 13% to 17% of the dose excreted within one hour after administration of 50 mg/m2. The mean renal clearance of cisplatin exceeds creatinine clearance and is 62 and 50 mL/min/m2 following administration of 100 mg/m2 as 2 hour or 6 hour to 7 hour infusions, respectively.

The renal clearance of free (ultrafilterable) platinum also exceeds the glomerular filtration rate indicating that cisplatin or other platinum-containing molecules are actively secreted by the kidneys.

The renal clearance of free platinum is nonlinear and variable and is dependent on dose, urine flow rate, and individual variability in the extent of active secretion and possible tubular reabsorption.

There is a potential for accumulation of ultrafilterable platinum plasma concentrations whenever cisplatin is administered on a daily basis but not when dosed on an intermittent basis.
No significant relationships exist between the renal clearance of either free platinum or cisplatin and creatinine clearance.
Although small amounts of platinum are present in the bile and large intestine after administration of cisplatin, the fecal excretion of platinum appears to be insignificant.

INDICATIONS

Cisplatin Injection is indicated as therapy to be employed as follows:

Metastatic Testicular Tumors
In established combination therapy with other approved chemotherapeutic agents in patients with metastatic testicular tumors who have already received appropriate surgical and/or radio therapeutic procedures.

Metastatic Ovarian Tumors

In established combination therapy with other approved chemotherapeutic agents in patients with metastatic ovarian tumors who have already received appropriate surgical and/or radiotherapeutic procedures. An established combination consists of cisplatin and cyclophosphamide. Cisplatin Injection, as a single agent, is indicated as secondary therapy in patients with metastatic ovarian tumors refractory to standard chemotherapy who have not previously received Cisplatin Injection therapy.
Advanced Bladder Cancer
Cisplatin Injection is indicated as a single agent for patients with transitional cell bladder cancer which is no longer amenable to local treatments, such as surgery and/or radiotherapy.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Cisplatin is contraindicated in patients with pre-existing renal impairment. Cisplatin should not be employed in myelosuppressed patients, or in patients with hearing impairment.

Cisplatin is contraindicated in patients with a history of allergic reactions to cisplatin or other platinum containing compounds.

WARNINGS

Cisplatin produces cumulative nephrotoxicity which is potentiated by aminoglycoside antibiotics. The serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine clearance, and magnesium, sodium, potassium, and calcium levels should be measured prior to initiating therapy, and prior to each subsequent course. At the recommended dosage, cisplatin should not be given more frequently than once every 3 to 4 weeks (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). Elderly patients may be more susceptible to nephrotoxicity (see PRECAUTIONS , Geriatric Use).
There are reports of severe neuropathies in patients in whom regimens are employed using higher doses of cisplatin or greater dose frequencies than those recommended. These neuropathies may be irreversible and are seen as paresthesias in a stocking-glove distribution, areflexia, and loss of proprioception and vibratory sensation. Elderly patients may be more susceptible to peripheral neuropathy (see PRECAUTIONS , Geriatric Use).
Loss of motor function has also been reported.
Anaphylactic-like reactions to cisplatin have been reported. These reactions have occurred within minutes of administration to patients with prior exposure to cisplatin, and have been alleviated by administration of epinephrine, corticosteroids, and antihistamines.
Cisplatin can commonly cause ototoxicity which is cumulative and may be severe. Audiometric testing should be performed prior to initiating therapy and prior to each subsequent dose of drug (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).
All pediatric patients receiving Cisplatin should have audiometric testing at baseline, prior to each subsequent dose of drug and for several years post therapy.
Cisplatin can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Cisplatin is mutagenic in bacteria and produces chromosome aberrations in animal cells in tissue culture. In mice cisplatin is teratogenic and embryotoxic. If this drug is used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Patients should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant.
The carcinogenic effect of cisplatin was studied in BD IX rats. Cisplatin was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) to 50 BD IX rats for 3 weeks, 3 x 1 mg/kg body weight per week. Four hundred and fifty-five days after the first application, 33 animals died, 13 of them related to malignancies: 12 leukemias and 1 renal fibrosarcoma.

The development of acute leukemia coincident with the use of cisplatin has been reported. In these reports, cisplatin was generally given in combination with other leukemogenic agents.
Injection site reactions may occur during the administration of cisplatin (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). Given the possibility of extravasation, it is recommended to closely monitor the infusion site for possible infiltration during drug administration. A specific treatment for extravasation reactions is unknown at this time.

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