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6.2 Post-Marketing Experience

Because adverse events are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. The following spontaneous adverse events have been reported during the marketing of desloratadine:

Cardiac disorders: tachycardia, palpitations

Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: dyspnea

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: rash, pruritus

Nervous system disorders: psychomotor hyperactivity, movement disorders (including dystonia, tics, and extrapyramidal symptoms), seizures (reported in patients with and without a known seizure disorder)

Immune system disorders: hypersensitivity reactions (such as urticaria, edema and anaphylaxis)

Investigations: elevated liver enzymes including bilirubin

Hepatobiliary disorders: hepatitis

Metabolism and nutrition disorders: increased appetite

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Inhibitors of Cytochrome P450 3A4

In controlled clinical studies co-administration of desloratadine with ketoconazole, erythromycin, or azithromycin resulted in increased plasma concentrations of desloratadine and 3 hydroxydesloratadine, but there were no clinically relevant changes in the safety profile of desloratadine. [See Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).]

7.2 Fluoxetine

In controlled clinical studies co-administration of desloratadine with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), resulted in increased plasma concentrations of desloratadine and 3 hydroxydesloratadine, but there were no clinically relevant changes in the safety profile of desloratadine. [See Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).]

7.3 Cimetidine

In controlled clinical studies co-administration of desloratadine with cimetidine, a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, resulted in increased plasma concentrations of desloratadine and 3 hydroxydesloratadine, but there were no clinically relevant changes in the safety profile of desloratadine. [See Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).]

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

The limited available data with CLARINEX in pregnant women are not sufficient to inform a drug-associated risk for major birth defects and miscarriage. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Desloratadine given during organogenesis to pregnant rats was not teratogenic at the summed area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)-based exposures of desloratadine and its metabolite approximately 320 times that at the recommended human daily oral dose (RHD) of 5 mg/day. Desloratadine given during organogenesis to pregnant rabbits was not teratogenic at the AUC-based exposures of desloratadine approximately 230 times that at the RHD. Desloratadine given to pregnant rats during organogenesis through lactation resulted in reduced body weight and slow righting reflex of F1 pups at the summed AUC-based exposures of desloratadine and its metabolite approximately 70 times or greater than that at the RHD [see Data].

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

Desloratadine was given orally during organogenesis to pregnant rats at doses of 6, 24 and 48 mg/kg/day (approximately 50, 200 and 320 times the summed AUC-based exposure of desloratadine and its metabolite at the RHD). No fetal malformations were present. Reduced fetal weights and skeletal variations noted at doses of 24 and 48 mg/kg/day were likely secondary to the maternal toxicities of reduced body weight gain and food consumption observed at the same doses. Desloratadine was also given orally during organogenesis to pregnant rabbits at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg/day (approximately 30, 70 and 230 times the AUC-based exposure of desloratadine at the RHD). No adverse effects to the fetus were noted. Reduced maternal body weight gain was noted in rabbits at 60 mg/kg/day. In a peri- and post-natal development study, desloratadine was given to rats orally during the peri-natal (Gestation Day 6) through lactation periods (Postpartum Day 21) at doses of 3, 9 and 18 mg/kg/day. Reduced body weight and slow righting reflex were reported in F1 pups at doses of 9 mg/kg/day or greater (approximately 70 times or greater than the summed AUC-based exposure of desloratadine and its metabolite at the RHD). Desloratadine had no effect on F1 pup development at 3 mg/kg/day (approximately 10 times the summed AUC-based exposure of desloratadine and its metabolite at the RHD). Maternal toxicities including reduced body weight gain and food consumption were noted at 18 mg/kg/day for F0 dams. F1 offspring were subsequently mated and there was no developmental toxicity for F2 pups observed.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Desloratadine passes into breast milk. There are not sufficient data on the effects of desloratadine on the breastfed infant or the effects of desloratadine on milk production. The decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue desloratadine, taking into account the developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding, the nursing mother’s clinical need, and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from desloratadine or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Infertility

There are no data available on human infertility associated with desloratadine.

There were no clinically relevant effects of desloratadine on female fertility in rats. A male specific decrease in fertility occurred at an oral desloratadine dose of 12 mg/kg or greater in rats (approximately 65 times the summed AUC-based exposure of desloratadine and its metabolite at the RHD). Male fertility was unaffected at a desloratadine dose of 3 mg/kg (approximately 10 times the summed AUC-based exposure of desloratadine and its metabolite at the RHD). [See Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1).]

8.4 Pediatric Use

The recommended dose of CLARINEX Oral Solution in the pediatric population is based on cross-study comparison of the plasma concentration of CLARINEX in adults and pediatric subjects. The safety of CLARINEX Oral Solution has been established in 246 pediatric subjects aged 6 months to 11 years in three placebo-controlled clinical studies. Since the course of seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria and the effects of CLARINEX are sufficiently similar in the pediatric and adult populations, it allows extrapolation from the adult efficacy data to pediatric patients. The effectiveness of CLARINEX Oral Solution in these age groups is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies of CLARINEX Tablets in adults. The safety and effectiveness of CLARINEX Tablets or CLARINEX Oral Solution have not been demonstrated in pediatric patients less than 6 months of age. [See Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).]

The CLARINEX RediTabs 2.5-mg tablet has not been evaluated in pediatric patients. Bioequivalence of the CLARINEX RediTabs Tablet and the previously marketed RediTabs Tablet was established in adults. In conjunction with the dose-finding studies in pediatrics described, the pharmacokinetic data for CLARINEX RediTabs supports the use of the 2.5-mg dose strength in pediatric patients 6 to 11 years of age.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of desloratadine did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. [See Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).]

8.6 Renal Impairment

Dosage adjustment for patients with renal impairment is recommended [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

Dosage adjustment for patients with hepatic impairment is recommended [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

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