Clotrimazole and Betamethasone Dipropionate

CLOTRIMAZOLE AND BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE- clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream
REMEDYREPACK INC.

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) is a combination of an azole antifungal and corticosteroid and is indicated for the topical treatment of symptomatic inflammatory tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis due to Epidermophyton floccosum , Trichophyton mentagrophytes , and Trichophyton rubrum in patients 17 years and older.

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Treatment of tinea corporis or tinea cruris:

  • Apply a thin film of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) into the affected skin areas twice a day for one week.
  • Do not use more than 45 grams per week. Do not use with occlusive dressings.
  • If a patient shows no clinical improvement after 1 week of treatment with clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base), the diagnosis should be reviewed.
  • Do not use longer than 2 weeks.

Treatment of tinea pedis:

  • Gently massage a sufficient amount of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) into the affected skin areas twice a day for two weeks.
  • Do not use more than 45 grams per week. Do not use with occlusive dressings.
  • If a patient shows no clinical improvement after 2 weeks of treatment with clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) the diagnosis should be reviewed.
  • Do not use longer than 4 weeks.

Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) is for topical use only. It is not for oral, ophthalmic, or intravaginal use.

Avoid contact with eyes. Wash hands after each application.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Cream, 1%/0.05%. Each gram of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream USP, 1%/0.05% (base) contains 10 mg of clotrimazole, USP and 0.64 mg of betamethasone dipropionate, USP (equivalent to 0.5 mg of betamethasone) in a white to off-white cream base.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

None.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Effects on Endocrine System

Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) can cause reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency. This may occur during treatment or after withdrawal of treatment. Cushing’s syndrome and hyperglycemia may also occur due to the systemic effect of corticosteroids while on treatment. Factors that predispose a patient to HPA axis suppression include the use of high-potency steroids, large treatment surface areas, prolonged use, use of occlusive dressing, altered skin barrier, liver failure, and young age.

Because of the potential for systemic corticosteroid effects, patients may need to be periodically evaluated for HPA axis suppression. This may be done by using the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test.

In a small trial, clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) was applied using large dosages, 7 g daily for 14 days (BID) to the crural area of normal adult subjects. Three of the 8 normal subjects on whom clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) was applied exhibited low morning plasma cortisol levels during treatment. One of these subjects had an abnormal cosyntropin test. The effect on morning plasma cortisol was transient and subjects recovered 1 week after discontinuing dosing. In addition, 2 separate trials in pediatric subjects demonstrated adrenal suppression as determined by cosyntropin testing [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)] .

If HPA axis suppression is documented, gradually withdraw the drug, reduce the frequency of application, or substitute with a less potent corticosteroid.

Pediatric patients may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity due to their larger skin-surface-to-body mass ratios [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)] .

5.2 Diaper Dermatitis

The use of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) in the treatment of diaper dermatitis is not recommended.

5.3 Ophthalmic Adverse Reactions

Use of topical corticosteroids may increase the risk of posterior subcapsular cataracts and glaucoma. Cataracts and

glaucoma have been reported in postmarketing experience with the use of topical corticosteroid products, including topical betamethasone products [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)].

Avoid contact of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) with eyes. Advise patients to report any visual symptoms and consider referral to an ophthalmologist for evaluation.

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

6.1 Clinical Trial Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

In clinical trials common adverse reaction reported for clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) was paresthesia in 1.9% of patients. Adverse reactions reported at a frequency < 1% included rash, edema, and secondary infection.

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

Because adverse reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

The following local adverse reactions have been reported with topical corticosteroids: itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, maceration of the skin, skin atrophy, striae, miliaria, capillary fragility (ecchymoses), telangiectasia, and sensitization (local reactions upon repeated application of product).

Ophthalmic adverse reactions of blurred vision, cataracts, glaucoma, increased intraocular pressure, and central serous chorioretinopathy have been reported with the use of topical corticosteroids, including topical betamethasone products.

Adverse reactions reported with the use of clotrimazole are: erythema, stinging, blistering, peeling, edema, pruritus, urticaria, and general irritation of the skin.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no available data on topical betamethasone dipropionate or clotrimazole use in pregnant women to identify a clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes.

Observational studies suggest an increased risk of low birthweight infants with the use of potent or very potent topical corticosteroid during pregnancy . Advise pregnant women that clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base)may increase the risk of having a low birthweight infant and to use clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base) on the smallest area of skin and for the shortest duration possible.

There have been no reproduction studies performed in animals or humans with the combination of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate. In an animal reproduction study, betamethasone dipropionate caused malformations (i.e., umbilical hernias, cephalocele, and cleft palate) in pregnant rabbits when given by the intramuscular route during organogenesis [see Data]. The available data do not allow the calculation of relevant comparisons between the systemic exposure of clotrimazole and/or betamethasone dipropionate observed in the animal studies to the systemic exposure that would be expected in humans after topical use of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, 1%/0.05% (base).

  1. The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2 to 4% and 15 to 20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

Clotrimazole

Studies in pregnant rats treated during organogenesis with intravaginal doses up to 100 mg/kg/day revealed no evidence of fetotoxicity due to clotrimazole exposure.

No increase in fetal malformations was noted in pregnant rats receiving oral (gastric tube) clotrimazole doses up to 100 mg/kg/day during gestation Days 6 to 15. However, clotrimazole dosed at 100 mg/kg/day was embryotoxic (increased resorptions), fetotoxic (reduced fetal weights), and maternally toxic (reduced body weight gain) to rats. Clotrimazole dosed at 200 mg/kg/day was maternally lethal, and therefore, fetuses were not evaluated in this group. Also in this study, doses up to 50 mg/kg/day had no adverse effects on dams or fetuses. However, in the combined fertility, embryofetal development, and postnatal development study conducted in rats, 50 mg/kg/day clotrimazole was associated with reduced maternal weight gain and reduced numbers of offspring reared to 4 weeks [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

Oral clotrimazole doses of 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day did not cause malformations in pregnant mice. No evidence of maternal toxicity or embryotoxicity was seen in pregnant rabbits dosed orally during organogenesis with 60, 120, or 180 mg/kg/day.

Betamethasone Dipropionate

Betamethasone dipropionate caused malformations when given to pregnant rabbits during organogenesis by the intramuscular route at doses of 0.05 mg/kg/day. The abnormalities observed included umbilical hernias, cephalocele, and cleft palates.

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