Clotrimazole and Betamethasone Dipropionate

CLOTRIMAZOLE AND BETAMETHASONE DIPROPIONATE- clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream
A-S Medication Solutions

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream is a combination of an azole antifungal and corticosteroid and is indicated for the topical treatment of symptomatic inflammatory tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis due to Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum in patients 17 years and older.

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Treatment of tinea corporis or tinea cruris:

  • Apply a thin film of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream into the affected skin areas twice a day for one week.
  • Do not use more than 45 grams per week. Do not use with occlusive dressings.
  • If a patient shows no clinical improvement after 1 week of treatment with clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, the diagnosis should be reviewed.
  • Do not use longer than 2 weeks.

Treatment of tinea pedis:

  • Gently massage a sufficient amount of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream into the affected skin areas twice a day for two weeks.
  • Do not use more than 45 grams per week. Do not use with occlusive dressings.
  • If a patient shows no clinical improvement after 2 week of treatment with clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, the diagnosis should be reviewed.
  • Do not use longer than 4 weeks.

Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream is for topical use only. It is not for oral, ophthalmic, or intravaginal use.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Cream, 1%/0.05% (base). Each gram of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream, USP contains 10 mg of clotrimazole, USP and 0.64 mg of betamethasone dipropionate USP, (equivalent to 0.5 mg of betamethasone) in a white to off-white hydrophilic cream.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

None.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Effects on Endocrine System

Clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream can cause reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency. This may occur during treatment or after withdrawal of treatment. Cushing’s syndrome and hyperglycemia may also occur due to the systemic effect of corticosteroids while on treatment. Factors that predispose a patient to HPA axis suppression include the use of high-potency steroids, large treatment surface areas, prolonged use, use of occlusive dressing, altered skin barrier, liver failure, and young age.

Because of the potential for systemic corticosteroid effects, patients may need to be periodically evaluated for HPA axis suppression. This may be done by using the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test.

In a small trial, clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream was applied using large dosages, 7 g daily for 14 days (twice a day) to the crural area of normal adult subjects. Three of the 8 normal subjects on whom clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream was applied exhibited low morning plasma cortisol levels during treatment. One of these subjects had an abnormal cosyntropin test. The effect on morning plasma cortisol was transient and subjects recovered 1 week after discontinuing dosing. In addition, 2 separate trials in pediatric subjects demonstrated adrenal suppression as determined by cosyntropin testing [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)].

If HPA axis suppression is documented, gradually withdraw the drug, reduce the frequency of application, or substitute with a less potent corticosteroid.

Pediatric patients may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity due to their larger skin-surface-to-body mass ratios [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)].

5.2 Diaper Dermatitis

The use of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream in the treatment of diaper dermatitis is not recommended.

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

6.1 Clinical Trial Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

In clinical trials common adverse reaction reported for clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream was paresthesia in 1.9% of patients. Adverse reactions reported at a frequency less than 1% included rash, edema, and secondary infection.

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

Because adverse reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

The following local adverse reactions have been reported with topical corticosteroids: itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, maceration of the skin, skin atrophy, striae, miliaria, capillary fragility (ecchymoses), telangiectasia, and sensitization (local reactions upon repeated application of product).

Adverse reactions reported with the use of clotrimazole are: erythema, stinging, blistering, peeling, edema, pruritus, urticaria, and general irritation of the skin.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category C

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies with clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream in pregnant women. Therefore, clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

There have been no teratogenic studies performed in animals or humans with the combination of clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate. Corticosteroids are generally teratogenic in laboratory animals when administered at relatively low dosage levels.

Studies in pregnant rats with intravaginal doses up to 100 mg/kg (15 times the maximum human dose) revealed no evidence of fetotoxicity due to clotrimazole exposure.

No increase in fetal malformations was noted in pregnant rats receiving oral (gastric tube) clotrimazole doses up to 100 mg/kg/day during gestation Days 6 to 15. However, clotrimazole dosed at 100 mg/kg/day was embryotoxic (increased resorptions), fetotoxic (reduced fetal weights), and maternally toxic (reduced body weight gain) to rats. Clotrimazole dosed at 200 mg/kg/day (30 times the maximum human dose) was maternally lethal, and therefore, fetuses were not evaluated in this group. Also in this study, doses up to 50 mg/kg/day (8 times the maximum human dose) had no adverse effects on dams or fetuses. However, in the combined fertility, teratogenicity, and postnatal development study described above, 50 mg/kg clotrimazole was associated with reduced maternal weight gain and reduced numbers of offspring reared to 4 weeks.

Oral clotrimazole doses of 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day (2 to 15 times the maximum human dose) were not teratogenic in mice. No evidence of maternal toxicity or embryotoxicity was seen in pregnant rabbits dosed orally with 60, 120, or 180 mg/kg/day (18 to 55 times the maximum human dose).

Betamethasone dipropionate has been shown to be teratogenic in rabbits when given by the intramuscular route at doses of 0.05 mg/kg. This dose is approximately one-fifth the maximum human dose. The abnormalities observed included umbilical hernias, cephalocele, and cleft palates.

Betamethasone dipropionate has not been tested for teratogenic potential by the dermal route of administration. Some corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after dermal application to laboratory animals.

8.3 Nursing Mothers

Systemically administered corticosteroids appear in human milk and can suppress growth, interfere with endogenous corticosteroid production, or cause other untoward effects. It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids can result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when clotrimazole and betamethasone dipropionate cream is administered to a nursing woman.

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