Colchicine (Page 2 of 8)

2.5 Dose Modification in Renal Impairment

Colchicine, USP dosing must be individualized according to the patient’s renal function [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6)].

Clcr in mL/minute may be estimated from serum creatinine (mg/dL) determination using the following formula:

[140-age (years) × weight (kg)]

Clcr = —————————————- × 0.85 for female patients

72 × serum creatinine (mg/dL)

Gout Flares

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild (estimated creatinine clearance [Clcr ] 50 to 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 to 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, the starting dose should be 0.3 mg/day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring. For the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients undergoing dialysis, the starting doses should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Use in Specific Populations (8.6)].

Treatment of Gout Flares

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild (Clcr 50 to 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 to 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted for the treatment of gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every two weeks. For patients with gout flares requiring repeated courses, consideration should be given to alternate therapy. For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for the treatment of gout flares should be reduced to a single dose of 0.6 mg (one tablet). For these patients, the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every two weeks [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Use in Specific Populations (8.6)].

Treatment of gout flares with colchicine tablets, USP is not recommended in patients with renal impairment who are receiving colchicine tablets, USP for prophylaxis.

FMF
Caution should be taken in dosing patients with moderate and severe renal impairment and in patients undergoing dialysis. For these patients, the dosage should be reduced [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Patients with mild (Clcr 50 to 80 mL/min) and moderate (Clcr 30 to 50 mL/min) renal impairment should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine tablets, USP. Dose reduction may be necessary. For patients with severe renal failure (Clcr less than 30 mL/min), start with 0.3 mg/day; any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of colchicine [see Use in Specific Populations (8.6)] . For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended starting dose should be 0.3 mg (half tablet) per day. Dosing can be increased with close monitoring. Any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of colchicine [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Use in Specific Populations (8.6)].

2.6 Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment

Gout Flares

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered for the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7)].

Treatment of Gout Flares

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, for the treatment of gout flares in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every two weeks. For these patients, requiring repeated courses for the treatment of gout flares, consideration should be given to alternate therapy [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7)].

Treatment of gout flares with colchicine tablets, USP is not recommended in patients with hepatic impairment who are receiving colchicine tablets, USP for prophylaxis.

FMF Patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Use in Specific Populations (8.7)] .

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Tablets: 0.6 mg colchicine — purple capsule-shaped, film-coated tablets, scored on one side and debossed with “A10” on the other side.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

Patients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given colchicine, USP in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (this includes all protease inhibitors except fosamprenavir). In these patients, life-threatening and fatal colchicine, USP toxicity has been reported with colchicine, USP taken in therapeutic doses.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Fatal Overdose

Fatal overdoses, both accidental and intentional, have been reported in adults and children who have ingested colchicine [see Overdosage (10) ]. Colchicine should be kept out of the reach of children.

5.2 Blood Dyscrasias

Myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia and aplastic anemia have been reported with colchicine used in therapeutic doses.

5.3 Drug Interactions

Colchicine is a P-gp and CYP3A4 substrate. Life-threatening and fatal drug interactions have been reported in patients treated with colchicine given with P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. If treatment with a P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitor is required in patients with normal renal and hepatic function, the patient’s dose of colchicine may need to be reduced or interrupted [see Drug Interactions (7)]. Use of colchicine in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (this includes all protease inhibitors except fosamprenavir) is contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment [see Contraindications (4)].

5.4 Neuromuscular Toxicity

Colchicine-induced neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis have been reported with chronic treatment in therapeutic doses. Patients with renal dysfunction and elderly patients, even those with normal renal and hepatic function, are at increased risk. Concomitant use of atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, fenofibric acid or benzafibrate (themselves associated with myotoxicity) or cyclosporine with colchicine may potentiate the development of myopathy [see Drug Interactions (7)]. Once colchicine is stopped, the symptoms generally resolve within one week to several months.

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares

The most commonly reported adverse reaction in clinical trials of colchicine for the prophylaxis of gout was diarrhea.

Treatment of Gout Flares

The most common adverse reactions reported in the clinical trial with colchicine for treatment of gout flares were diarrhea (23%) and pharyngolaryngeal pain (3%).

FMF

Gastrointestinal tract adverse effects are the most frequent side effects in patients initiating colchicine, usually presenting within 24 hours, and occurring in up to 20% of patients given therapeutic doses. Typical symptoms include cramping, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain and vomiting. These events should be viewed as dose-limiting if severe, as they can herald the onset of more significant toxicity.

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