Colchicine (Page 5 of 10)

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies with colchicine for prophylaxis and treatment of gout flares and for treatment of FMF did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 years and older to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient with gout should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased renal function, concomitant disease or other drug therapy [see Dosage and Administration (2.4), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.6 Renal Impairment

Colchicine is significantly excreted in urine in healthy subjects. Clearance of colchicine is decreased in patients with impaired renal function. Total body clearance of colchicine was reduced by 75% in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis.

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild (estimated creatinine clearance Clcr 50 to 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 to 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, the starting dose should be 0.3 mg per day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring. For the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients undergoing dialysis, the starting doses should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)].

Treatment of Gout Flares

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild (Clcr 50 to 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 to 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine tablets. However, in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted for the treatment of gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every two weeks. For patients with gout flares requiring repeated courses, consideration should be given to alternate therapy. For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for the treatment of gout flares should be reduced to a single dose of 0.6 mg (one tablet). For these patients, the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every two weeks [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)].

FMF

Although pharmacokinetics of colchicine in patients with mild (Clcr 50 to 80 mL/min) and moderate (Clcr 30 to 50 mL/min) renal impairment is not known, these patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction may be necessary. In patients with severe renal failure (Clcr less than 30 mL/min) and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis, colchicine tablets may be started at the dose of 0.3 mg/day. Any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of colchicine tablets [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Dosage and Administration (2.5)].

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

The clearance of colchicine may be significantly reduced and plasma half-life prolonged in patients with chronic hepatic impairment compared to healthy subjects [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered for the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Dosage and Administration (2.6)].

Treatment of Gout Flares

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended colchicine tablets dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine tablets. However, for the treatment of gout flares in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted, the treatment course should be repeated no more than once every two weeks. For these patients, requiring repeated courses for the treatment of gout flares, consideration should be given to alternate therapy [see Dosage and Administration (2.6)].

FMF

In patients with severe hepatic disease, dose reduction should be considered with careful monitoring [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Dosage and Administration (2.6)].

9 DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

Tolerance, abuse or dependence with colchicine has not been reported.

10 OVERDOSAGE

The exact dose of colchicine that produces significant toxicity is unknown. Fatalities have occurred after ingestion of a dose as low as 7 mg over a four day period, while other patients have survived after ingesting more than 60 mg. A review of 150 patients who overdosed on colchicine found that those who ingested less than 0.5 mg/kg survived and tended to have milder toxicities such as gastrointestinal symptoms, whereas those who took 0.5 to 0.8 mg/kg had more severe reactions such as myelosuppression. There was 100% mortality in those who ingested more than 0.8 mg/kg.

The first stage of acute colchicine toxicity typically begins within 24 hours of ingestion and includes gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and significant fluid loss, leading to volume depletion. Peripheral leukocytosis may also be seen. Life-threatening complications occur during the second stage, which occurs 24 to 72 hours after drug administration, attributed to multiorgan failure and its consequences. Death is usually a result of respiratory depression and cardiovascular collapse. If the patient survives, recovery of multiorgan injury may be accompanied by rebound leukocytosis and alopecia starting about one week after the initial ingestion.

Treatment of colchicine poisoning should begin with gastric lavage and measures to prevent shock. Otherwise, treatment is symptomatic and supportive. No specific antidote is known. Colchicine is not effectively removed by dialysis [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

11 DESCRIPTION

Colchicine is an alkaloid chemically described as Acetamide, N -(5,6,7,9-tetrahydro-1,2,3,10-tetramethoxy-9-oxobenzo[a ]heptalen-7-yl)-, (S)- with a molecular formula of C22 H25 NO6 and a molecular weight of 399.44. The structural formula of colchicine is given below.

Colchicine Structural Formula
(click image for full-size original)

Colchicine, USP occurs as a white to pale yellow powder that is soluble in water.

Colchicine tablets, USP are supplied for oral administration as red, film-coated, oval, scored tablets (0.1770” × 0.3240”), debossed with M on one side of the tablet and CC to the left of the score and 2 to the right of the score on the other side, containing 0.6 mg of the active ingredient colchicine, USP. Inactive ingredients: hypromellose, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, pregelatinized starch (corn), polydextrose, polyethylene glycol, red iron oxide, sodium starch glycolate (potato), titanium dioxide and yellow iron oxide.

All MedLibrary.org resources are included in as near-original form as possible, meaning that the information from the original provider has been rendered here with only typographical or stylistic modifications and not with any substantive alterations of content, meaning or intent.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only, in accordance with our Terms of Use, and is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a medical doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner or other qualified health professional.

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2022. All Rights Reserved.