Combunox (Page 5 of 6)

Pediatric Use

In the placebo-controlled, clinical studies of pain following dental surgery, 109 patients between the ages of 14 and 17 years were administered a single dose of Combunox. No apparent differences were noted in the safety of Combunox in patients below and above 17 years of age. Combunox has not been studied in patients under 14 years of age. Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients below the age of 14 have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Of the total number of subjects in clinical studies of Combunox, 89 patients were 65 and over, while 37 patients were 75 and over. No overall differences in safety were observed between these subjects and younger subjects, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

However, because the elderly may be more sensitive to the renal and gastrointestinal effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents as well as possible increased risk of respiratory depression with opioids, extra caution should be used when treating the elderly with Combunox.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Listed below are the adverse event incidence rates from single dose analgesia trials in which a total of 2437 patients received either Combunox, ibuprofen (400 mg), oxycodone HCl (5 mg), or placebo. Adverse event information is also provided from an additional 334 patients who were exposed to Combunox in a multiple dose analgesia trial, without placebo or active component comparison arms, given up to four times daily for up to 7 days.

Adverse Events Which Occurred at a Frequency of ≥1% and at a Higher Incidence than in the Placebo Group in Single Dose Studies
5/400 mg
(n=923)
400 mg Ibuprofen
(n=913)
5 mg Oxycodone HCl
(n = 286)
Placebo
(n=315)
Digestive
Nausea 81 (8.8%) 44 (4.8%) 46 (16.1%) 21 (6.7%)
Vomiting 49 (5.3%) 16 (1.8%) 30 (10.5%) 10 (3.2%)
Flatulence 9 (1.0%) 7 (0.8%) 3 (1.0%) 0
Nervous System
Somnolence 67 (7.3%) 38 (4.2%) 12 (4.2%) 7 (2.2%)
Dizziness 47 (5.1%) 21 (2.3%) 17 (5.9%) 8 (2.5%)
Skin and Appendages
Sweat 15 (1.6%) 7 (0.8%) 4 (1.4%) 1 (0.3%)

Adverse events that were reported by at least 1% of patients taking Combunox but were observed at a greater incidence in the placebo treated patients were fever, headache and pruritus.

Adverse events that occurred in less than 1% and in at least two Combunox treated patients in Single Dose studies not listed above include the following: Body as Whole: abdominal pain, asthenia, chest pain, enlarged abdomen. Cardiovascular System: hypotension, syncope, tachycardia, vasodilation. Digestive System: constipation, dry mouth, dyspepsia, eructation, ileus. Hemic and Lymphatic System: anemia. Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders: edema. Nervous System: euphoria, insomnia, nervousness. Respiratory System: hypoxia, lung disorder, pharyngitis. Urogenital System: urinary retention.

Adverse events that occurred in the Multiple Dose study in at least 2% of patients treated with Combunox include the following: Body as Whole: asthenia (3.3%), fever (3.0%), headache (10.2%). Cardiovascular System: vasodilation (3.0%). Digestive System: constipation (4.5%), diarrhea (2.1%), dyspepsia (2.1%), nausea (25.4%), vomiting (4.5%). Nervous System: dizziness (19.2%), somnolence (17.4%).

Adverse events that occurred in less than 2% of and at least two Combunox treated patients in the Multiple Dose study not listed previously include the following: Body as Whole: back pain, chills, infection. Cardiovascular System: thrombophlebitis. Hemic and Lymphatic System: ecchymosis. Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders: hypokalemia. Musculoskeletal System: arthritis. Nervous System: abnormal thinking, anxiety, hyperkinesia, hypertonia. Skin and Appendages: rash. Special Senses: amblyopia, taste perversion. Urogenital System: urinary frequency.

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

Combunox contains oxycodone, which is a mu-opioid agonist with an abuse liability similar to other opioid agonists and is a Schedule II controlled substance. Combunox, and other opioids used in analgesia, can be abused and are subject to criminal diversion.

Addiction is a primary, chronic, neurobiologic disease, with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. It is characterized by behaviors that include one or more of the following: impaired control over drug use, compulsive use, continued use despite harm, and craving. Drug addiction is a treatable disease utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, but relapse is common.

“Drug seeking” behavior is very common in addicts and drug abusers. Drug-seeking tactics include emergency calls or visits near the end of office hours, refusal to undergo appropriate examination, testing or referral, repeated “loss” of prescriptions, tampering with prescriptions and reluctance to provide prior medical records or contact information for other treating physician(s). “Doctor shopping” to obtain additional prescriptions is common among drug abusers and people suffering from untreated addiction.

Abuse and addiction are separate and distinct from physical dependence and tolerance. Physical dependence usually assumes clinically significant dimensions only after several weeks of continued opioid use, although a mild degree of physical dependence may develop after a few days of opioid therapy. Tolerance, in which increasingly large doses are required in order to produce the same degree of analgesia, is manifested initially by a shortened duration of analgesic effect, and subsequently by decreases in the intensity of analgesia. The rate of development of tolerance varies among patients. Physicians should be aware that abuse of opioids can occur in the absence of true addiction and is characterized by misuse for non-medical purposes, often in combination with other psychoactive substances. Combunox, like other opioids, may be diverted for non-medical use. Record-keeping of prescribing information, including quantity, frequency, and renewal requests is strongly advised.

Proper assessment of the patient, proper prescribing practices, periodic re-evaluation of therapy, and proper dispensing and storage are appropriate measures that help to limit abuse of opioid drugs.

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