Combunox (Page 6 of 6)

OVERDOSAGE

Following an acute overdosage, toxicity may result from oxycodone and/or ibuprofen.

Signs and Symptoms

Acute overdosage with oxycodone may be manifested by respiratory depression, somnolence progressing to stupor or coma, skeletal muscle flaccidity, cold and clammy skin, constricted pupils, bradycardia, or hypotension. In severe cases death may occur.

The toxicity of ibuprofen overdose is dependent on the amount of drug ingested and the time elapsed since ingestion, although individual response may vary, necessitating individual evaluation of each case. Although uncommon, serious toxicity and death have been reported in the medical literature with ibuprofen overdosage. The most frequently reported symptoms of ibuprofen overdose include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, lethargy, and drowsiness. Other central nervous system symptoms include headache, tinnitus, CNS depression, and seizures. Cardiovascular toxicity, including hypotension, bradycardia, tachycardia, and atrial fibrillation, have also been reported.

Treatment:

In the treatment of opioid overdosage, primary attention should be given to the re-establishment of a patent airway and institution of assisted or controlled ventilation. Supportive measures (including oxygen and vasopressors) should be employed in the management of circulatory shock and pulmonary edema accompanying overdose, as indicated. Cardiac arrest or arrhythmias may require cardiac massage or defibrillation. The narcotic antagonist naloxone hydrochloride is a specific antidote against respiratory depression, which may result from overdosage or unusual sensitivity to narcotics including oxycodone. An appropriate dose of naloxone hydrochloride should be administered intravenously with simultaneous efforts at respiratory resuscitation. Since the duration of action of oxycodone may exceed that of the naloxone, the patient should be kept under continuous surveillance and repeated doses of the antagonist should be administered as needed to maintain adequate respiration. Management of hypotension, acidosis and gastrointestinal bleeding may be necessary. In cases of acute overdose, the stomach should be emptied through ipecac-induced emesis or gastric lavage. Orally administered activated charcoal may help in reducing the absorption and reabsorption of ibuprofen. Emesis is most effective if initiated within 30 minutes of ingestion. Induced emesis is not recommended in patients with impaired consciousness or overdoses greater than 400 mg/kg of the ibuprofen component in children because of the risk for convulsions and the potential for aspiration of gastric contents.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of Combunox and other treatment options before deciding to use Combunox. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see WARNINGS).

After observing the response to initial therapy with Combunox, the dose and frequency should be adjusted to suit an individual patient’s needs.”

For the management of acute moderate to severe pain, the recommended dose of Combunox is one tablet given orally.

Dosage should not exceed 4 tablets in a 24-hour period and should not exceed 7 days.

HOW SUPPLIED

Combunox are capsule shaped, white to off-white, film-coated tablets with “F” bisect “P” on one side and “5400” on the other side.

Bottles of 100-NDC #0456-5200-01

Storage:

Store at 25ºC (77ºF); excursions permitted to 15º to 30ºC (59º to 86ºF).

A Schedule CII Narcotic

Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Subsidiary of Forest Laboratories, Inc.
St. Louis, MO 63045 USA

Rev 03/06
(c) 2006 Forest Laboratories, Inc.

MEDICATION GUIDE
for
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

(See the end of this Medication Guide for a list of prescription NSAID medicines.)

What is the most important information I should know about medicines called Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)?

NSAID medicines may increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke that can lead to death. This chance increases:

  • with longer use of NSAID medicines
  • in people who have heart disease

NSAID medicines should never be used right before or after a heart surgery called a “coronary artery bypass graft (CABG).”

NSAID medicines can cause ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestines at any time during treatment. Ulcers and bleeding:

  • can happen without warning symptoms
  • may cause death

The chance of a person getting an ulcer or bleeding increases with:

  • taking medicines called “corticosteroids” and “anticoagulants”
  • longer use
  • smoking
  • drinking alcohol
  • older age
  • having poor health

NSAID medicines should only be used:

  • exactly as prescribed
  • at the lowest dose possible for your treatment
  • for the shortest time needed

What are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)?

NSAID medicines are used to treat pain and redness, swelling, and heat (inflammation) from medical conditions such as:

  • different types of arthritis
  • menstrual cramps and other types of short-term pain

Who should not take a Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)?

Do not take an NSAID medicine:

  • if you had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergic reaction with aspirin or any other NSAID medicine
  • for pain right before or after heart bypass surgery

Tell your healthcare provider:

  • about all your medical conditions.
  • about all of the medicines you take. NSAIDs and some other medicines can interact with each other and cause serious side effects. Keep a list of your medicines to show to your healthcare provider and pharmacist.
  • if you are pregnant. NSAID medicines should not be used by pregnant women late in their pregnancy.
  • if you are breastfeeding. Talk to your doctor.

What are the possible side effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)?

Serious side effects include:
  • heart attack
  • stroke
  • high blood pressure
  • heart failure from body swelling (fluid retention)
  • kidney problems including kidney failure
  • bleeding and ulcers in the stomach and intestine
  • low red blood cells (anemia)
  • life-threatening skin reactions
  • life-threatening allergic reactions
  • liver problems including liver failure
  • asthma attacks in people who have asthma
Other side effects include:
  • stomach pain
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • gas
  • heartburn
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • dizziness

Get emergency help right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • shortness of breath or trouble breathing
  • chest pain
  • weakness in one part or side of your body
  • slurred speech
  • swelling of the face or throat

Stop your NSAID medicine and call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • nausea
  • more tired or weaker than usual
  • itching
  • your skin or eyes look yellow
  • stomach pain
  • flu-like symptoms
  • vomit blood
  • there is blood in your bowel movement or it is black and sticky like tar
  • unusual weight gain
  • skin rash or blisters with fever
  • swelling of the arms and legs, hands and feet

These are not all the side effects with NSAID medicines. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist for more information about NSAID medicines.

Other information about Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

  • Aspirin is an NSAID medicine but it does not increase the chance of a heart attack. Aspirin can cause bleeding in the brain, stomach, and intestines. Aspirin can also cause ulcers in the stomach and intestines.
  • Some of these NSAID medicines are sold in lower doses without a prescription (over-the-counter). Talk to your healthcare provider before using over-the-counter NSAIDs for more than 10 days.

NSAID medicines that need a prescription

Generic Name Tradename
Celecoxib Celebrex
Diclofenac Cataflam, Voltaren, Arthrotec (combined with misoprostol)
Diflunisal Dolobid
Etodolac Lodine, Lodine XL
Fenoprofen Nalfon, Nalfon 200
Flurbirofen Ansaid
Ibuprofen Motrin, Tab-Profen, Vicoprofen (combined with hydrocodone), Combunox (combined with oxycodone)
Indomethacin Indocin, Indocin SR, Indo-Lemmon, Indomethagan
Ketoprofen Oruvail
Ketorolac Toradol
Mefenamic Acid Ponstel
Meloxicam Mobic
Nabumetone Relafen
Naproxen Naprosyn, Anaprox, Anaprox DS, EC-Naproxyn, Naprelan, Naprapac (copackaged with lansoprazole)
Oxaprozin Daypro
Piroxicam Feldene
Sulindac Clinoril
Tolmetin Tolectin, Tolectin DS, Tolectin 600

This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

COMBUNOX
oxycodone hydrochloride and ibuprofen tablet
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:0456-5200
Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule CII
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
Oxycodone hydrochloride (Oxycodone) Oxycodone 5 mg
Ibuprofen (Ibuprofen) Ibuprofen 400 mg
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
sodium starch glycolate
microcrystalline cellulose
colloidal silicon dioxide
stearic acid
calcium stearate
carboxymethylcellulose
povidone
titanium dioxide
polydextrose
hypromellose
triacetin
polyethylene glycol 8000
Product Characteristics
Color WHITE (White to off-white) Score 2 pieces
Shape OVAL (Capsule) Size 19mm
Flavor Imprint Code F;P;5400
Contains
Coating true Symbol false
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:0456-5200-01 100 TABLET (100 TABLET) in 1 BOTTLE None
Labeler — Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Revised: 02/2007 Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

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