COMPLERA

COMPLERA — emtricitabine, rilpivirine hydrochloride and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate tablet, film coated
Physicians Total Care, Inc.

WARNING: LACTIC ACIDOSIS/SEVERE HEPATOMEGALY WITH STEATOSIS and POST TREATMENT ACUTE EXACERBATION OF HEPATITIS B

Lactic acidosis and severe hepatomegaly with steatosis, including fatal cases, have been reported with the use of nucleoside analogs, including tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, a component of COMPLERA, in combination with other antiretrovirals [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

COMPLERA is not approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the safety and efficacy of COMPLERA have not been established in patients coinfected with HBV and HIV-1. Severe acute exacerbations of hepatitis B have been reported in patients who are coinfected with HBV and HIV-1 and have discontinued EMTRIVA or VIREAD, which are components of COMPLERA. Hepatic function should be monitored closely with both clinical and laboratory follow-up for at least several months in patients who are coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and discontinue COMPLERA. If appropriate, initiation of anti-hepatitis B therapy may be warranted [See Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

COMPLERA® (emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) is indicated for use as a complete regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in antiretroviral treatment-naive adult patients with HIV-1 RNA less than or equal to 100,000 copies/mL at the start of therapy.

This indication is based on safety and efficacy analyses through 96 weeks from 2 randomized, double-blind, active controlled, Phase 3 trials in treatment-naive subjects comparing rilpivirine to efavirenz [See Clinical Studies (14)].

The following points should be considered when initiating therapy with COMPLERA:

  • More rilpivirine-treated subjects with HIV-1 RNA greater than 100,000 copies/mL at the start of therapy experienced virologic failure (HIV-1 RNA ≥50 copies/mL) compared to rilpivirine-treated subjects with HIV-1 RNA less than or equal to 100,000 copies/mL [See Clinical Studies (14)].
  • Regardless of HIV-1 RNA level at the start of therapy, more rilpivirine-treated subjects with CD4+ cell count less than 200 cells/mm3 experienced virologic failure compared to rilpivirine-treated subjects with CD4+ cell count greater than or equal to 200 cells/mm3 [See Clinical Studies (14)].
  • The observed virologic failure rate in rilpivirine-treated subjects conferred a higher rate of overall treatment resistance and cross-resistance to the NNRTI class compared to efavirenz [See Microbiology (12.4)].
  • More subjects treated with rilpivirine developed tenofovir and lamivudine/emtricitabine associated resistance compared to efavirenz [See Microbiology (12.4)].

COMPLERA is not recommended for patients less than 18 years of age [See Use in Specific Populations (8.4)].

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Adults: The recommended dose of COMPLERA is one tablet taken orally once daily with a meal [See Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

Renal Impairment: Because COMPLERA is a fixed-dose combination, it should not be prescribed for patients requiring dose adjustment such as those with moderate or severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance below 50 mL per minute).

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

COMPLERA is available as tablets. Each tablet contains 200 mg of emtricitabine (FTC), 27.5 mg of rilpivirine hydrochloride (equivalent to 25 mg of rilpivirine) and 300 mg of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (tenofovir DF or TDF, equivalent to 245 mg of tenofovir disoproxil).

The tablets are purplish-pink, capsule-shaped, film-coated, debossed with “GSI” on one side and plain-faced on the other side.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

COMPLERA should not be coadministered with the following drugs, as significant decreases in rilpivirine plasma concentrations may occur due to CYP3A enzyme induction or gastric pH increase, which may result in loss of virologic response and possible resistance to COMPLERA or to the class of NNRTIs [See Drug Interactions (7) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]:

  • the anticonvulsants carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin
  • the antimycobacterials rifabutin, rifampin, rifapentine
  • proton pump inhibitors, such as dexlansoprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole
  • the glucocorticoid systemic dexamethasone (more than a single dose)
  • St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Lactic Acidosis/Severe Hepatomegaly with Steatosis

Lactic acidosis and severe hepatomegaly with steatosis, including fatal cases, have been reported with the use of nucleoside analogs, including tenofovir DF, a component of COMPLERA, in combination with other antiretrovirals. A majority of these cases have been in women. Obesity and prolonged nucleoside exposure may be risk factors. Particular caution should be exercised when administering nucleoside analogs to any patient with known risk factors for liver disease; however, cases have also been reported in patients with no known risk factors. Treatment with COMPLERA should be suspended in any patient who develops clinical or laboratory findings suggestive of lactic acidosis or pronounced hepatotoxicity (which may include hepatomegaly and steatosis even in the absence of marked transaminase elevations).

5.2 Patients Coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV

It is recommended that all patients with HIV-1 be tested for the presence of chronic hepatitis B virus before initiating antiretroviral therapy. COMPLERA is not approved for the treatment of chronic HBV infection and the safety and efficacy of COMPLERA have not been established in patients coinfected with HBV and HIV-1. Severe acute exacerbations of hepatitis B have been reported in patients who are coinfected with HBV and HIV-1 and have discontinued emtricitabine or tenofovir DF, two of the components of COMPLERA. In some patients infected with HBV and treated with EMTRIVA® , the exacerbations of hepatitis B were associated with liver decompensation and liver failure. Patients who are coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV should be closely monitored with both clinical and laboratory follow-up for at least several months after stopping treatment with COMPLERA. If appropriate, initiation of anti-hepatitis B therapy may be warranted.

5.3 New Onset or Worsening Renal Impairment

Renal impairment, including cases of acute renal failure and Fanconi syndrome (renal tubular injury with severe hypophosphatemia), has been reported with the use of tenofovir DF [See Adverse Reactions (6.2)].

It is recommended that creatinine clearance be calculated in all patients prior to initiating therapy and as clinically appropriate during therapy with COMPLERA. Routine monitoring of calculated creatinine clearance and serum phosphorus should be performed in patients at risk for renal impairment, including patients who have previously experienced renal events while receiving HEPSERA®.

COMPLERA should be avoided with concurrent or recent use of a nephrotoxic agent.

Emtricitabine and tenofovir are principally eliminated by the kidney; however, rilpivirine is not. Since COMPLERA is a combination product and the dose of the individual components cannot be altered, patients with creatinine clearance below 50 mL per minute should not receive COMPLERA.

5.4 Drug Interactions

Caution should be given to prescribing COMPLERA with drugs that may reduce the exposure of rilpivirine [See Contraindications (4), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

In healthy subjects, supratherapeutic doses of rilpivirine (75 mg once daily and 300 mg once daily) have been shown to prolong the QTc interval of the electrocardiogram [See Drug Interactions (7) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)]. COMPLERA should be used with caution when coadministered with a drug with a known risk of Torsade de Pointes.

5.5 Depressive Disorders

The adverse reaction depressive disorders (depressed mood, depression, dysphoria, major depression, mood altered, negative thoughts, suicide attempt, suicidal ideation) has been reported with rilpivirine. During the Phase 3 trials (N=1368) through 96 weeks, the incidence of depressive disorders (regardless of causality, severity) reported among rilpivirine (N=686) or efavirenz (N=682) was 9% and 8%, respectively. Most events were mild or moderate in severity. The incidence of Grade 3 and 4 depressive disorders (regardless of causality) was 1% for both rilpivirine and efavirenz. The incidence of discontinuation due to depressive disorders among rilpivirine or efavirenz was 1% in each arm. Suicidal ideation was reported in 4 subjects in each arm while suicide attempt was reported in 2 subjects in the rilpivirine arm. Patients with severe depressive symptoms should seek immediate medical evaluation to assess the possibility that the symptoms are related to COMPLERA, and if so, to determine whether the risks of continued therapy outweigh the benefits.

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