Cortisone Acetate (Page 2 of 2)

Usage in Pregnancy

Since adequate human reproduction studies have not been done with corticosteroids, use of these drugs in pregnancy or in women of childbearing potential requires that the anticipated benefits be weighed against the possible hazards to the mother and embryo or fetus. Infants born of mothers who have received substantial doses of corticosteroids during pregnancy should be carefully observed for signs of hypoadrenalism.

Corticosteroids appear in breast milk and could suppress growth, interfere with endogenous corticosteroid production, or cause other unwanted effects. Mothers taking pharmacologic doses of corticosteroids should be advised not to nurse.

PRECAUTIONS:

General

Following prolonged therapy, withdrawal of corticosteroids may result in symptoms of the corticosteroid withdrawal syndrome including fever, myalgia, arthralgia, and malaise. This may occur in patients even without evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

There is an enhanced effect of corticosteroids in patients with hypothyroidism and in those with cirrhosis.

Corticosteroids should be used cautiously in patients with ocular herpes simplex because of possible corneal perforation.

The lowest possible dose of corticosteroid should be used to control the condition under treatment, and when reduction in dosage is possible, the reduction should be gradual.

Psychic derangements may appear when corticosteroids are used, ranging from euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and severe depression, to frank psychotic manifestations. Also, existing emotional instability or psychotic tendencies may be aggravated by corticosteroids.

Aspirin should be used cautiously in conjunction with corticosteroids in hypoprothrombinemia.

Steroids should be used with caution in nonspecific ulcerative colitis, if there is a probability of impending perforation, abscess, or other pyogenic infection, diverticulitis, fresh intestinal anastomoses, active or latent peptic ulcer, renal insufficiency, hypertension, osteoporosis, and myasthenia gravis. Signs of peritoneal irritation following gastrointestinal perforation in patients receiving large doses of corticosteroids may be minimal or absent. Fat embolism has been reported as a possible complication of hypercortisonism.

When large doses are given, some authorities advise that corticosteroids be taken with meals and antacids taken between meals to help to prevent peptic ulcer.

Growth and development of infants and children on prolonged corticosteroid therapy should be carefully observed.

Steroids may increase or decrease motility and number of spermatozoa in some patients.

Phenytoin, phenobarbital, ephedrine, and rifampin may enhance the metabolic clearance of corticosteroids, resulting in decreased blood levels and lessened physiologic activity, thus requiring adjustment in corticosteroid dosage.

The prothrombin time should be checked frequently in patients who are receiving corticosteroids and coumarin anticoagulants at the same time because of reports that corticosteroids have altered the response to these anticoagulants. Studies have shown that the usual effect produced by adding corticosteroids is inhibition of response to coumarins, although there have been some conflicting reports of potentiation not substantiated by studies.

When corticosteroids are administered concomitantly with potassium-depleting diuretics, patients should be observed closely for development of hypokalemia.

Information for Patients

Persons who are on immunosuppressant doses of corticosteroids should be warned to avoid exposure to chickenpox or measles. Patients should also be advised that if they are exposed, medical advice should be sought without delay.

ADVERSE REACTIONS:

Fluid and Electrolyte Disturbances

  • Sodium retention
  • Fluid retention
  • Congestive heart failure in susceptible patients
  • Potassium loss
  • Hypokalemic alkalosis
  • Hypertension

Musculoskeletal

  • Muscle weakness
  • Steroid myopathy
  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Osteoporosis
  • Vertebral compression fractures
  • Aseptic necrosis of femoral and humeral heads
  • Pathologic fracture of long bones
  • Tendon rupture

Gastrointestinal

  • Peptic ulcer with possible perforation and hemorrhage
  • Perforation of the small and large bowel, particularly in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
  • Pancreatitis
  • Abdominal distention
  • Ulcerative esophagitis

Dermatologic

  • Impaired wound healing
  • Thin fragile skin
  • Petechiae and ecchymoses
  • Erythema
  • Increased sweating
  • May suppress reactions to skin tests
  • Other cutaneous reactions, such as allergic dermatitis, urticaria, angioneurotic edema

Neurologic

  • Convulsions
  • Increased intracranial pressure with papilledema (pseudotumor cerbri) usually after treatment
  • Vertigo
  • Headache
  • Psychic disturbances

Endocrine

  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Development of cushingoid state
  • Suppression of growth in children
  • Secondary adrenocortical and pituitary unresponsiveness, particularly in times of stress, as in trauma, surgery, or illness
  • Decreased carbohydrate tolerance
  • Manifestations of latent diabetes mellitus
  • Increased requirements for insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents in diabetics
  • Hirsutism

Ophthalmic

  • Posterior subcapsular cataracts
  • Increased intraocular pressure
  • Glaucoma
  • Exophthalmos

Metabolic

  • Negative nitrogen balance due to protein catabolism

Cardiovascular

  • Myocardial rupture following recent myocardial infarctions (see WARNINGS).

Other

  • Hypersensitivity
  • Thromboembolism
  • Weight gain
  • Increased appetite
  • Nausea
  • Malaise

OVERDOSAGE:

Reports of acute toxicity and/or death following overdosage of glucocorticoids are rare. In the event of overdosage, no specific antidote is available; treatment is supportive and symptomatic.

The intraperitoneal LD50 of cortisone acetate in female mice was 1405 mg/kg.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION:

For Oral Administration

DOSAGE REQUIREMENTS ARE VARIABLE AND MUST BE INDIVIDUALIZED ON THE BASIS OF THE DISEASE AND THE RESPONSE OF THE PATIENT.

The initial dosage varies from 25 to 300 mg a day depending on the disease being treated. In less severe diseases doses lower than 25 mg may suffice, while in severe diseases doses higher than 300 mg may be required. The initial dosage should be maintained or adjusted until the patient’s response is satisfactory. If satisfactory clinical response does not occur after a reasonable period of time, discontinue cortisone acetate tablets and transfer the patient to other therapy.

After a favorable initial response, the proper maintenance dosage should be determined by decreasing the initial dosage in small amounts to the lowest dosage that maintains an adequate clinical response.

Patients should be observed closely for signs that might require dosage adjustment, including changes in clinical status resulting from remissions or exacerbations of the disease, individual drug responsiveness, and the effect of stress (e.g., surgery, infection, trauma). During stress it may be necessary to increase dosage temporarily.

If the drug is to be stopped after more than a few days of treatment, it usually should be withdrawn gradually.

HOW SUPPLIED:

Cortisone Acetate Tablets USP 25 mg: White, Round, Scored Tablet; Imprinted “West-ward 202.”

  • Bottles of 100 tablets (NDC 60429-015-01).

Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from light and moisture.

Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP using a child-resistant closure.

Manufactured by: West-ward Pharmaceutical Corp Eatontown, N.J. 07724Marketed/Packaged by: GSMS Inc. Camarillo, CA 93012

Revised July 2009

PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL

Label Graphic -- 25 mg
(click image for full-size original)
CORTISONE ACETATE cortisone acetate tablet
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:60429-015(NDC:0143-1202)
Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
CORTISONE ACETATE (CORTISONE) CORTISONE ACETATE 25 mg
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
ANHYDROUS LACTOSE
COLLOIDAL SILICON DIOXIDE
MAGNESIUM STEARATE
CELLULOSE, MICROCRYSTALLINE
SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE
SODIUM STARCH GLYCOLATE TYPE A POTATO
Product Characteristics
Color WHITE (WHITE) Score 2 pieces
Shape ROUND (ROUND) Size 10mm
Flavor Imprint Code West;ward;202
Contains
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:60429-015-01 100 TABLET in 1 BOTTLE, PLASTIC None
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
ANDA ANDA080776 06/13/1972
Labeler — Golden State Medical Supply, Inc. (603184490)
Establishment
Name Address ID/FEI Operations
Golden State Medical Supply, Inc. 603184490 REPACK (60429-015)

Revised: 07/2011 Golden State Medical Supply, Inc.

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