DELSTRIGO (Page 4 of 10)

7.3 Effect of DELSTRIGO on Other Drugs

No clinically significant changes in concentration were observed for the following agents when co-administered with doravirine: lamivudine, TDF, elbasvir and grazoprevir, ledipasvir and sofosbuvir, atorvastatin, an oral contraceptive containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel, metformin, methadone, or midazolam.

No clinically significant drug interactions have been observed between TDF and the following medications: entecavir, methadone, oral contraceptives, sofosbuvir, or tacrolimus in studies conducted in healthy subjects.

Lamivudine is not significantly metabolized by CYP enzymes nor does it inhibit or induce this enzyme system; therefore, it is unlikely that clinically significant drug interactions will occur through these pathways [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in individuals exposed to DELSTRIGO during pregnancy. Healthcare providers are encouraged to register patients by calling the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry (APR) at 1-800-258-4263.

Risk Summary

There is insufficient prospective pregnancy data from the APR to adequately assess the risk of birth defects and miscarriage. Doravirine use in individuals during pregnancy has not been evaluated; however, lamivudine and TDF use during pregnancy has been evaluated in a limited number of individuals reported to the APR. Available data from the APR show no difference in the overall risk of major birth defects for lamivudine and TDF compared with the background rate for major birth defects of 2.7% in the U.S. reference population of the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) (see Data). The rate of miscarriage is not reported in the APR. The estimated background rate of miscarriage in the clinically recognized pregnancies in the U.S. general population is 15-20%. Methodological limitations of the APR include the use of MACDP as the external comparator group. The MACDP population is not disease-specific, evaluates individuals and infants from the limited geographic area, and does not include outcomes for births that occurred at less than 20 weeks gestation.

In animal reproduction studies, oral administration of lamivudine to pregnant rabbits during organogenesis resulted in embryolethality at systemic exposure (AUC) similar to the recommended clinical dose; however, no adverse development effects were observed with oral administration of lamivudine to pregnant rats during organogenesis at plasma concentrations (Cmax ) 35 times the recommended clinical dose.

No adverse developmental effects were observed when doravirine and TDF were administered separately at doses/exposures ≥8 (doravirine) and ≥14 (TDF) times those of the recommended human dose (RHD) of DELSTRIGO (see Data).

Data

Human Data

Lamivudine: The APR has received a total of over 13,000 prospective reports with follow-up data of possible exposure to lamivudine-containing regimens; over 5,900 reports in the first trimester; over 5,600 reports in the second trimester; and over 1,800 reports in the third trimester. Birth defects occurred in 170 of 5,472 (3.1%, 95% CI: 2.7% to 3.6%) live births for lamivudine-containing regimens (first trimester exposure); and 218 of 7,513 (2.9%, 95% CI: 2.5% to 3.3%) live births for lamivudine-containing regimens (second/third trimester exposure). Among pregnant mothers in the U.S. reference population, the background rate of birth defects is 2.7%. There was no association between lamivudine and overall birth defects observed in the APR.

TDF: The APR has received a total of over 7,000 prospective reports with follow-up data of possible exposure to tenofovir disoproxil-containing regimens; over 5,100 reports in the first trimester; over 1,300 reports in the second trimester; and over 600 reports in the third trimester. Birth defects occurred in 113 of 4,576 (2.5%, 95% CI: 2.0% to 3.0%) live births for TDF-containing regimens (first trimester exposure); and 51 of 1,965 (2.6%, 95% CI: 1.9% to 3.4%) live births for TDF-containing regimens (second/third trimester exposure). Among pregnant mothers in the U.S. reference population, the background rate of birth defects is 2.7%. There was no association between tenofovir and overall birth defects observed in the APR.

Animal Data

Doravirine: Doravirine was administered orally to pregnant rabbits (up to 300 mg/kg/day on gestation days (GD) 7 to 20) and rats (up to 450 mg/kg/day on GD 6 to 20 and separately from GD 6 to lactation/postpartum day 20). No significant toxicological effects on embryo-fetal (rats and rabbits) or pre/post-natal (rats) development were observed at exposures (AUC) approximately 9 times (rats) and 8 times (rabbits) the exposure in humans at the RHD. Doravirine was transferred to the fetus through the placenta in embryo-fetal studies, with fetal plasma concentrations of up to 40% (rabbits) and 52% (rats) that of maternal concentrations observed on gestation day 20.

Lamivudine: Lamivudine was administered orally to pregnant rats (at 90, 600, and 4,000 mg per kg per day) and rabbits (at 90, 300, and 1,000 mg per kg per day and at 15, 40, and 90 mg per kg per day) during organogenesis (on gestation Days 7 through 16 [rat] and 8 through 20 [rabbit]). No evidence of fetal malformations due to lamivudine was observed in rats and rabbits at doses producing plasma concentrations (Cmax ) approximately 35 times higher than human exposure at the recommended daily dose. Evidence of early embryolethality was seen in the rabbit at system exposures (AUC) similar to those observed in humans, but there was no indication of this effect in the rat at plasma concentrations (Cmax ) 35 times higher than human exposure at the recommended daily dose. Studies in pregnant rats showed that lamivudine is transferred to the fetus through the placenta. In the fertility/pre- and postnatal development study in rats, lamivudine was administered orally at doses of 180, 900, and 4,000 mg per kg per day (from prior to mating through postnatal Day 20). In the study, development of the offspring, including fertility and reproductive performance, was not affected by maternal administration of lamivudine.

TDF: Reproduction studies have been performed in rats and rabbits at doses up to 14 and 19 times the human dose based on body surface area comparisons and revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that HIV-1-infected mothers in the United States not breastfeed their infants to avoid risking potential transmission of HIV-1 infection.

Based on limited published data, both lamivudine and tenofovir are present in human milk. It is unknown whether doravirine is present in human milk, but doravirine is present in the milk of lactating rats (see Data). It is not known whether DELSTRIGO or the components of DELSTRIGO affects human milk production, or has effects on the breastfed infant. Because of the potential for (1) HIV-1 transmission (in HIV-negative infants), (2) developing viral resistance (in HIV-positive infants), and (3) serious adverse reactions in a breastfed infant, instruct mothers not to breastfeed if they are receiving DELSTRIGO.

Data

Doravirine : Doravirine was excreted into the milk of lactating rats following oral administration (450 mg/kg/day) from gestation day 6 to lactation day 14, with milk concentrations approximately 1.5 times that of maternal plasma concentrations observed 2 hours post dose on lactation day 14.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and efficacy of DELSTRIGO for the treatment of HIV-1 infection have been established in pediatric patients weighing at least 35 kg [see Indications and Usage (1) and Dosage and Administration (2.2)].

Use of DELSTRIGO in this group is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled trials in adults with additional pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy data from an open-label trial in virologically-suppressed or treatment-naïve pediatric subjects 12 to less than 18 years of age. The safety and efficacy of DELSTRIGO in these pediatric subjects were similar to that in adults, and there was no clinically significant difference in exposure for the components of DELSTRIGO. [see Adverse Reactions (6.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), and Clinical Studies (14.3).]

Safety and efficacy of DELSTRIGO in pediatric patients weighing less than 35 kg have not been established.

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