DESCOVY (Page 3 of 9)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of products containing TAF. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders

Angioedema, urticaria, and rash

Renal and Urinary Disorders

Acute renal failure, acute tubular necrosis, proximal renal tubulopathy, and Fanconi syndrome

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Potential for Other Drugs to Affect One or More Components of DESCOVY

TAF, a component of DESCOVY, is a substrate of P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3. Drugs that strongly affect P-gp and BCRP activity may lead to changes in TAF absorption (see Table 5). Drugs that induce P-gp activity are expected to decrease the absorption of TAF, resulting in decreased plasma concentration of TAF, which may lead to loss of therapeutic effect of DESCOVY and development of resistance. Coadministration of DESCOVY with other drugs that inhibit P-gp and BCRP may increase the absorption and plasma concentration of TAF. TAF is not an inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, or UGT1A1. TAF is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A in vitro. TAF is not an inhibitor or inducer of CYP3A in vivo.

7.2 Drugs Affecting Renal Function

Because FTC and tenofovir are primarily excreted by the kidneys by a combination of glomerular filtration and active tubular secretion, coadministration of DESCOVY with drugs that reduce renal function or compete for active tubular secretion may increase concentrations of FTC, tenofovir, and other renally eliminated drugs and this may increase the risk of adverse reactions. Some examples of drugs that are eliminated by active tubular secretion include, but are not limited to, acyclovir, cidofovir, ganciclovir, valacyclovir, valganciclovir, aminoglycosides (e.g., gentamicin), and high-dose or multiple NSAIDs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

7.3 Established and Other Potentially Significant Interactions

Table 6 provides a listing of established or potentially clinically significant drug interactions with recommended steps to prevent or manage the drug interaction (the table is not all inclusive). The drug interactions described are based on studies conducted with either DESCOVY, the components of DESCOVY (emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide) as individual agents, or are predicted drug interactions that may occur with DESCOVY. For magnitude of interaction, see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3).

Table 6 Established and Other Potentially Significant * Drug Interactions
Concomitant Drug Class: Drug Name Effect on Concentration Clinical Comment
*
This table is not all inclusive.
↓=Decrease
Antiretroviral Agents: Protease Inhibitors (PI)
tipranavir/ritonavir ↓ TAF Coadministration with DESCOVY is not recommended.
Other Agents
Anticonvulsants: carbamazepineoxcarbazepinephenobarbitalphenytoin ↓ TAF Consider alternative anticonvulsant.
Antimycobacterials: rifabutinrifampinrifapentine ↓ TAF Coadministration of DESCOVY with rifabutin, rifampin, or rifapentine is not recommended.
Herbal Products: St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) ↓ TAF Coadministration of DESCOVY with St. John’s wort is not recommended.

7.4 Drugs without Clinically Significant Interactions with DESCOVY

Based on drug interaction studies conducted with the components of DESCOVY, no clinically significant drug interactions have been either observed or are expected when DESCOVY is combined with the following antiretroviral agents: atazanavir with ritonavir or cobicistat, darunavir with ritonavir or cobicistat, dolutegravir, efavirenz, ledipasvir, lopinavir/ritonavir, maraviroc, nevirapine, raltegravir, rilpivirine, and sofosbuvir. No clinically significant drug interactions have been either observed or are expected when DESCOVY is combined with the following drugs: buprenorphine, itraconazole, ketoconazole, lorazepam, methadone, midazolam, naloxone, norbuprenorphine, norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol, and sertraline.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy Exposure Registry

There is a pregnancy exposure registry that monitors pregnancy outcomes in individuals exposed to DESCOVY during pregnancy. Healthcare providers are encouraged to register patients by calling the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry (APR) at 1-800-258-4263.

Risk Summary

Available data from the APR show no statistically significant difference in the overall risk of major birth defects for emtricitabine (FTC) or tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) compared with the background rate for major birth defects of 2.7% in a U.S. reference population of the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) (see Data). The rate of miscarriage for individual drugs is not reported in the APR. The estimated background rate of miscarriage in the clinically recognized pregnancies in the U.S. general population is 15–20%.

In animal studies, no adverse developmental effects were observed when the components of DESCOVY were administered separately during the period of organogenesis at exposures 60 and 108 times (mice and rabbits, respectively) the FTC exposure and at exposure equal to or 53 times (rats and rabbits, respectively) the TAF exposure at the recommended daily dose of DESCOVY (see Data). Likewise, no adverse developmental effects were seen when FTC was administered to mice through lactation at exposures up to approximately 60 times the exposure at the recommended daily dose of DESCOVY. No adverse effects were observed in the offspring when TDF was administered through lactation at tenofovir exposures of approximately 14 times the exposure at the recommended daily dosage of DESCOVY.

Data

Human Data

Prospective reports from the APR of overall major birth defects in pregnancies exposed to the components of DESCOVY are compared with a U.S. background major birth defect rate. Methodological limitations of the APR include the use of MACDP as the external comparator group. The MACDP population is not disease-specific, evaluates women and infants from a limited geographic area, and does not include outcomes for births that occurred at less than 20 weeks gestation.

Emtricitabine (FTC)

Based on prospective reports to the APR of over 5,400 exposures to FTC-containing regimens during pregnancy resulting in live births (including over 3,900 exposed in the first trimester and over 1,500 exposed in the second/third trimester), the prevalence of birth defects in live births was 2.6% (95% CI: 2.2% to 3.2%) and 2.7% (95% CI: 1.9% to 3.7%) following first and second/third trimester exposure, respectively, to FTC-containing regimens.

Tenofovir Alafenamide (TAF)

Based on prospective reports to the APR of over 660 exposures to TAF-containing regimens during pregnancy resulting in live births (including over 520 exposed in the first trimester and over 130 exposed in the second/third trimester), the prevalence of birth defects in live births was 4.2 % (95% CI: 2.6 % to 6.3 %) and 3.0% (95% CI: 0.8% to 7.5 %) following first and second/third trimester exposure, respectively, to TAF-containing regimens.

Animal Data

Emtricitabine: FTC was administered orally to pregnant mice (250, 500, or 1000 mg/kg/day) and rabbits (100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day) through organogenesis (on gestation days 6 through 15, and 7 through 19, respectively). No significant toxicological effects were observed in embryo-fetal toxicity studies performed with FTC in mice at exposures (area under the curve [AUC]) approximately 60 times higher and in rabbits at approximately 108 times higher than human exposures at the recommended daily dose. In a pre/postnatal development study with FTC, mice were administered doses up to 1000 mg/kg/day; no significant adverse effects directly related to drug were observed in the offspring exposed daily from before birth (in utero) through sexual maturity at daily exposures (AUC) of approximately 60-fold higher than human exposures at the recommended daily dose.

Tenofovir Alafenamide: TAF was administered orally to pregnant rats (25, 100, or 250 mg/kg/day) and rabbits (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg/day) through organogenesis (on gestation days 6 through 17, and 7 through 20, respectively). No adverse embryo-fetal effects were observed in rats and rabbits at TAF exposures approximately similar to (rats) and 53 (rabbits) times higher than the exposure in humans at the recommended daily dose of DESCOVY. TAF is rapidly converted to tenofovir; the observed tenofovir exposures in rats and rabbits were 59 (rats) and 93 (rabbits) times higher than human tenofovir exposures at the recommended daily dose. Since TAF is rapidly converted to tenofovir and a lower tenofovir exposure in rats and mice was observed after TAF administration compared to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF, another prodrug for tenofovir) administration, a pre/postnatal development study in rats was conducted only with TDF. Doses up to 600 mg/kg/day were administered through lactation; no adverse effects were observed in the offspring on gestation day 7 (and lactation day 20) at tenofovir exposures of approximately 14 (21) times higher than the exposures in humans at the recommended daily dose of DESCOVY.

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