Desmopressin Acetate (Page 3 of 4)

Laboratory Tests

Central Diabetes Insipidus

Laboratory tests for monitoring the patient with central diabetes insipidus or post-surgical or head trauma-related polyuria and polydipsia include urine volume and osmolality. In some cases, measurements of plasma osmolality may be useful.

Drug Interactions

Although the pressor activity of desmopressin acetate is very low compared to its antidiuretic activity, large doses of desmopressin acetate tablets should be used with other pressor agents only with careful patient monitoring. The concomitant administration of drugs that may increase the risk of water intoxication with hyponatremia (e.g., tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, chlorpromazine, opiate analgesics, NSAIDs, lamotrigine and carbamazepine) should be performed with caution.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Studies with desmopressin acetate have not been performed to evaluate carcinogenic potential, mutagenic potential or effects on fertility.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Category B

Fertility studies have not been done. Teratology studies in rats and rabbits at doses from 0.05 to 10 mcg/kg/day (approximately 0.1 times the maximum systemic human exposure in rats and up to 38 times the maximum systemic human exposure in rabbits based on surface area, mg/m 2) revealed no harm to the fetus due to desmopressin acetate. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Because animal studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed.

Several publications where desmopressin acetate was used in the management of diabetes insipidus during pregnancy are available; these include a few anecdotal reports of congenital anomalies and low birth weight babies. However, no causal connection between these events and desmopressin acetate has been established. A fifteen year Swedish epidemiologic study of the use of desmopressin acetate in pregnant women with diabetes insipidus found the rate of birth defects to be no greater than that in the general population; however, the statistical power of this study is low. As opposed to preparations containing natural hormones, desmopressin acetate in antidiuretic doses has no uterotonic action and the physician will have to weigh the possible therapeutic advantages against the possible risks in each case.

Nursing Mothers

There have been no controlled studies in nursing mothers. A single study in postpartum women demonstrated a marked change in plasma, but little if any change in assayable desmopressin acetate in breast milk following an intranasal dose of 0.01 mg.

It is not known whether the drug is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when desmopressin acetate is administered to nursing mothers.

Pediatric Use

Central Diabetes Insipidus

Desmopressin acetate tablets have been used safely in pediatric patients, age 4 years and older, with diabetes insipidus for periods up to 44 months. In younger pediatric patients the dose must be individually adjusted in order to prevent an excessive decrease in plasma osmolality leading to hyponatremia and possible convulsions; dosing should start at 0.05 mg (½ of the 0.1 mg tablet). Use of desmopressin acetate tablets in pediatric patients requires careful fluid intake restrictions to prevent possible hyponatremia and water intoxication. Fluid restriction should be discussed with the patient and/or guardian (see WARNINGS).

Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

Desmopressin acetate tablets have been safely used in pediatric patients age 6 years and older with primary nocturnal enuresis for up to 6 months. Some patients respond to a dose of 0.2 mg; however, increasing responses are seen at doses of 0.4 mg and 0.6 mg. No increase in the frequency or severity of adverse reactions or decrease in efficacy was seen with an increased dose or duration. The dose should be individually adjusted to achieve the best results. Treatment with desmopressin for primary nocturnal enuresis should be interrupted during acute intercurrent illness characterized by fluid and/or electrolyte imbalance (e.g., systemic infections, fever, recurrent vomiting or diarrhea) or under conditions of extremely hot weather, vigorous exercise or other conditions associated with increased water intake.

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of desmopressin acetate tablets did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

This drug is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney, and the risk of toxic reactions to this drug may be greater in patients with impaired renal function. Because elderly patients are more likely to have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection, and it may be useful to monitor renal function. Desmopressin acetate tablets are contraindicated in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment (defined as a creatinine clearance below 50 mL/min) (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY , Human Pharmacokinetics and CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Use of desmopressin acetate tablets in geriatric patients requires careful fluid intake restrictions to prevent possible hyponatremia and water intoxication. Fluid restriction should be discussed with the patient (see WARNINGS).

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Infrequently, large doses of the intranasal formulations of desmopressin acetate and desmopressin acetate injection have produced transient headache, nausea, flushing and mild abdominal cramps. These symptoms have disappeared with reduction in dosage.

Central Diabetes Insipidus

In long-term clinical studies in which patients with diabetes insipidus were followed for periods up to 44 months of desmopressin acetate tablet therapy, transient increases in AST (SGOT) no higher than 1.5 times the upper limit of normal were occasionally observed. Elevated AST (SGOT) returned to the normal range despite continued use of desmopressin acetate tablets.

Primary Nocturnal Enuresis

The only adverse event occurring in ≥ 3% of patients in controlled clinical trials with desmopressin acetate tablets that was probably, possibly, or remotely related to study drug was headache (4% desmopressin acetate, 3% placebo).

Other

The following adverse events have been reported; however their relationship to desmopressin acetate has not been established: abnormal thinking, diarrhea, and edema-weight gain.

See WARNINGS for the possibility of water intoxication and hyponatremia.

Postmarketing

There have been rare reports of hyponatremic convulsions associated with concomitant use with the following medications: oxybutinin and imipramine.

OVERDOSAGE

Signs of overdose may include confusion, drowsiness, continuing headache, problems with passing urine and rapid weight gain due to fluid retention (see WARNINGS). In case of overdose, the dose should be reduced, frequency of administration decreased, or the drug withdrawn according to the severity of the condition. There is no known specific antidote for desmopressin acetate. The patient should be observed and treated with appropriate symptomatic therapy.

An oral LD 50 has not been established. Oral doses up to 0.2 mg/kg/day have been administered to dogs and rats for 6 months without any significant drug-related toxicities reported. An intravenous dose of 2 mg/kg in mice demonstrated no effect.

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