Divalproex Sodium (Page 2 of 14)

2.2 Epilepsy

Divalproex sodium extended-release tablets are administered orally, and must be swallowed whole. As divalproex sodium extended-release tablet is titrated upward, concentrations of clonazepam, diazepam, ethosuximide, lamotrigine, tolbutamide, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and/or phenytoin may be affected [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].

Complex Partial Seizures

For adults and children 10 years of age or older.

Monotherapy (Initial Therapy)

Divalproex sodium extended-release tablet has not been systematically studied as initial therapy. Patients should initiate therapy at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day. The dosage should be increased by 5 to 10 mg/kg/week to achieve optimal clinical response. Ordinarily, optimal clinical response is achieved at daily doses below 60 mg/kg/day. If satisfactory clinical response has not been achieved, plasma levels should be measured to determine whether or not they are in the usually accepted therapeutic range (50 to 100 mcg/mL). No recommendation regarding the safety of valproate for use at doses above 60 mg/kg/day can be made.

The probability of thrombocytopenia increases significantly at total trough valproate plasma concentrations above 110 mcg/mL in females and 135 mcg/mL in males. The benefit of improved seizure control with higher doses should be weighed against the possibility of a greater incidence of adverse reactions.

Conversion to Monotherapy

Patients should initiate therapy at 10 to 15 mg/kg/day. The dosage should be increased by 5 to 10 mg/kg/week to achieve optimal clinical response. Ordinarily, optimal clinical response is achieved at daily doses below 60 mg/kg/day. If satisfactory clinical response has not been achieved, plasma levels should be measured to determine whether or not they are in the usually accepted therapeutic range (50 to 100 mcg/mL). No recommendation regarding the safety of valproate for use at doses above 60 mg/kg/day can be made.

Concomitant antiepilepsy drug (AED) dosage can ordinarily be reduced by approximately 25% every 2 weeks. This reduction may be started at initiation of divalproex sodium extended-release tablet therapy, or delayed by 1 to 2 weeks if there is a concern that seizures are likely to occur with a reduction. The speed and duration of withdrawal of the concomitant AED can be highly variable, and patients should be monitored closely during this period for increased seizure frequency.

Adjunctive Therapy

Divalproex sodium extended-release tablets may be added to the patient’s regimen at a dosage of 10 to 15 mg/kg/day. The dosage may be increased by 5 to 10 mg/kg/week to achieve optimal clinical response. Ordinarily, optimal clinical response is achieved at daily doses below 60 mg/kg/day. If satisfactory clinical response has not been achieved, plasma levels should be measured to determine whether or not they are in the usually accepted therapeutic range (50 to 100 mcg/mL). No recommendation regarding the safety of valproate for use at doses above 60 mg/kg/day can be made.

In a study of adjunctive therapy for complex partial seizures in which patients were receiving either carbamazepine or phenytoin in addition to valproate, no adjustment of carbamazepine or phenytoin dosage was needed [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. However, since valproate may interact with these or other concurrently administered AEDs as well as other drugs, periodic plasma concentration determinations of concomitant AEDs are recommended during the early course of therapy [see Drug Interactions (7)].

Simple and Complex Absence Seizures

The recommended initial dose is 15 mg/kg/day, increasing at one week intervals by 5 to 10 mg/kg/day until seizures are controlled or side effects preclude further increases. The maximum recommended dosage is 60 mg/kg/day.

A good correlation has not been established between daily dose, serum concentrations, and therapeutic effect. However, therapeutic valproate serum concentration for most patients with absence seizures is considered to range from 50 to 100 mcg/mL. Some patients may be controlled with lower or higher serum concentrations [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

As divalproex sodium extended-release tablet dosage is titrated upward, blood concentrations of phenobarbital and/or phenytoin may be affected [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].

Antiepilepsy drugs should not be abruptly discontinued in patients in whom the drug is administered to prevent major seizures because of the strong possibility of precipitating status epilepticus with attendant hypoxia and threat to life.

2.3 Migraine

Divalproex sodium extended-release tablets are indicated for prophylaxis of migraine headaches in adults.

The recommended starting dose is 500 mg once daily for 1 week, thereafter increasing to 1,000 mg once daily. Although doses other than 1,000 mg once daily of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets have not been evaluated in patients with migraine, the effective dose range of divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets in these patients is 500 to 1,000 mg/day. As with other valproate products, doses of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets should be individualized and dose adjustment may be necessary. If a patient requires smaller dose adjustments than that available with divalproex sodium extended-release tablets, divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets should be used instead.

2.4 Conversion from Divalproex Sodium Delayed-release Tablets to Divalproex Sodium Extended-release Tablets

In adult patients and pediatric patients 10 years of age or older with epilepsy previously receiving divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets, divalproex sodium extended-release tablets should be administered once-daily using a dose 8 to 20% higher than the total daily dose of divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets (Table 1). For patients whose divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets total daily dose cannot be directly converted to divalproex sodium extended-release tablets, consideration may be given at the clinician’s discretion to increase the patient’s divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets total daily dose to the next higher dosage before converting to the appropriate total daily dose of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets.

Table 1

Dose Conversion

Divalproex Sodium Delayed-release Tablets Total Daily Dose (mg) Divalproex Sodium Extended-release Tablets (mg)

500* to 625

750

750* to 875

1,000

1,000* to 1,125

1,250

1,250 to 1,375

1,500

1,500 to 1,625

1,750

1,750

2,000

1,875 to 2,000

2,250

2,125 to 2,250

2,500

2,375

2,750

2,500 to 2,750

3,000

2,875

3,250

3,000 to 3,125

3,500

* These total daily doses of divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets cannot be directly converted to an 8 to 20% higher total daily dose of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets because the required dosing strengths of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets are not available. Consideration may be given at the clinician’s discretion to increase the patient’s divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets total daily dose to the next higher dosage before converting to the appropriate total daily dose of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets.

There is insufficient data to allow a conversion factor recommendation for patients with divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets doses above 3,125 mg/day. Plasma valproate Cmin concentrations for divalproex sodium extended-release tablets on average are equivalent to divalproex sodium delayed-release tablets, but may vary across patients after conversion. If satisfactory clinical response has not been achieved, plasma levels should be measured to determine whether or not they are in the usually accepted therapeutic range (50 to 100 mcg/mL) [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.2)].

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