Dobutamine Hydrochloride in Dextrose (Page 3 of 3)

OVERDOSAGE

Overdoses of dobutamine have been reported rarely. The following is provided to serve as a guide if such an overdose is encountered.

Signs and Symptoms

Toxicity from dobutamine is usually due to excessive cardiac beta-receptor stimulation. The duration of action of dobutamine is generally short (T1/2 = two minutes) because it is rapidly metabolized by catechol-O-methyltransferase. The symptoms of toxicity may include anorexia, nausea, vomiting, tremor, anxiety, palpitations, headache, shortness of breath, and anginal and nonspecific chest pain. The positive inotropic and chronotropic effects of dobutamine on the myocardium may cause hypertension, tachyarrhythmias, myocardial ischemia, and ventricular fibrillation. Hypotension may result from vasodilation.

If the product is ingested, unpredictable absorption may occur from the mouth and the gastrointestinal tract.

Treatment

To obtain up-to-date information about the treatment of overdose, a good resource is your certified Regional Poison Control Center. Telephone numbers of certified poison control centers are listed in the Physicians’ Desk Reference (PDR). In managing overdosage, consider the possibility of multiple drug overdoses, interaction among drugs, and unusual drug kinetics in your patient.

The initial actions to be taken in a dobutamine overdose are discontinuing administration, establishing an airway, and ensuring oxygenation and ventilation. Resuscitative measures should be initiated promptly. Severe ventricular tachyarrhythmias may be successfully treated with propranolol or lidocaine. Hypertension usually responds to a reduction in dose or discontinuation of therapy.

Protect the patient’s airway and support ventilation and perfusion. If needed, meticulously monitor and maintain, within acceptable limits, the patient’s vital signs, blood gases, serum electrolytes, etc. Absorption of drugs from the gastrointestinal tract may be decreased by giving activated charcoal, which, in many cases, is more effective than emesis or lavage; consider charcoal instead of or in addition to gastric emptying. Repeated doses of charcoal over time may hasten elimination of some drugs that have been absorbed. Safeguard the patient’s airway when employing gastric emptying or charcoal.

Forced diuresis, peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or charcoal hemoperfusion have not been established as beneficial for an overdose of dobutamine.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Recommended Dosage

Dobutamine Hydrochloride in 5% Dextrose Injection is administered intravenously through a suitable intravenous catheter or needle. A calibrated electronic infusion device is recommended for controlling the rate of flow in mL/hour or drops/minute.

Infusion of dobutamine should be started at a low rate (0.5-1.0 mcg/kg/min) and titrated at intervals of a few minutes, guided by the patient’s response, including systemic blood pressure, urine flow, frequency of ectopic activity, heart rate, and (whenever possible) measurements of cardiac output, central venous pressure, and/or pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In reported trials, the optimal infusion rates have varied from patient to patient, usually 2-20 mcg/kg/min but sometimes slightly outside of this range. On rare occasions, infusion rates up to 40 mcg/kg/min have been required to obtain the desired effect.

Rates of infusion in mL/hour for dobutamine hydrochloride concentrations of 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 mcg/mL are in Table 2.

This container system may be inappropriate for the dosage requirements of pediatric patients under 30 kg. Other dosage forms may be more appropriate.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit.

Dobutamine Hydrochloride in 5% Dextrose Injection solutions may exhibit a pink color that, if present, will increase with time. This color change is due to slight oxidation of the drug, but there is no significant loss of potency.

The rate of administration and the duration of therapy should be adjusted according to the patient’s response, as determined by heart rate, presence of ectopic activity, blood pressure, urine flow, and, whenever possible, measurement of central venous or pulmonary wedge pressure and cardiac output.

Do not add supplementary medications to Dobutamine Hydrochloride in 5% Dextrose Injection. Do not administer Dobutamine Hydrochloride in 5% Dextrose Injection simultaneously with solutions containing sodium bicarbonate or strong alkaline solutions.

HOW SUPPLIED

Product: 50090-4562

NDC: 50090-4562-0 250 mL in a BAG

Dobutamine Hydrochloride

Label ImageLabel Image
DOBUTAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN DEXTROSE
dobutamine hydrochloride injection
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:50090-4562(NDC:0338-1077)
Route of Administration INTRAVENOUS DEA Schedule
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
DOBUTAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE (DOBUTAMINE) DOBUTAMINE 400 mg in 100 mL
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
DEXTROSE MONOHYDRATE 5 g in 100 mL
SODIUM BISULFITE 0.5 meq in 100 mL
SODIUM HYDROXIDE
HYDROCHLORIC ACID
WATER
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:50090-4562-0 250 mL in 1 BAG None
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
NDA NDA020255 09/23/1993
Labeler — A-S Medication Solutions (830016429)
Establishment
Name Address ID/FEI Operations
A-S Medication Solutions 830016429 RELABEL (50090-4562), REPACK (50090-4562)

Revised: 10/2019 A-S Medication Solutions

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