Edarbyclor (Page 2 of 7)

2.2 Prior to Dosing

Correct any volume depletion prior to administration of Edarbyclor, particularly in patients with impaired renal function or those treated with high doses of diuretics [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

Patients who experience dose-limiting adverse reactions on chlorthalidone may be switched to Edarbyclor, initially with a lower dose of chlorthalidone [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

2.3 Handling Instructions

As Edarbyclor is moisture sensitive, dispense and store Edarbyclor in its original container to protect Edarbyclor from light and moisture.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Edarbyclor is supplied in the following dosage strengths:

  • 40/12.5 mg: pale red, round, biconvex, film-coated tablets, approximately 9.7 mm in diameter, with “A/C” and “40/12.5″ imprinted on one side. Each tablet contains 40 mg of azilsartan medoxomil and 12.5 mg of chlorthalidone.
  • 40/25 mg: light red, round, biconvex, film-coated tablets, approximately 9.7 mm in diameter, with “A/C” and “40/25″ imprinted on one side. Each tablet contains 40 mg of azilsartan medoxomil and 25 mg of chlorthalidone.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Fetal Toxicity

Azilsartan medoxomil

Use of drugs that act on the renin-angiotensin system during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy reduces fetal renal function and increases fetal and neonatal morbidity and death. Resulting oligohydramnios can be associated with fetal lung hypoplasia and skeletal deformations. Potential neonatal adverse effects include skull hypoplasia, anuria, hypotension, renal failure, and death. When pregnancy is detected, discontinue Edarbyclor as soon as possible [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].

Chlorthalidone

Thiazides cross the placental barrier and appear in cord blood. Adverse reactions include fetal or neonatal jaundice and thrombocytopenia.

5.2 Hypotension in Volume- or Salt-Depleted Patients

In patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system, such as volume- or salt-depleted patients (e.g., those being treated with high doses of diuretics), symptomatic hypotension may occur after initiation of treatment with Edarbyclor. Such patients are probably not good candidates to start therapy with more than one drug; therefore, correct volume prior to administration of Edarbyclor. If hypotension does occur, the patient should be placed in the supine position and, if necessary, given an intravenous infusion of normal saline. A transient hypotensive response is not a contraindication to further treatment, which usually can be continued without difficulty once the blood pressure has stabilized.

5.3 Impaired Renal Function

Edarbyclor

Monitor for worsening renal function in patients with renal impairment. Consider withholding or discontinuing Edarbyclor if progressive renal impairment becomes evident.

Azilsartan medoxomil

As a consequence of inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system, changes in renal function may be anticipated in susceptible individuals treated with Edarbyclor. In patients whose renal function may depend on the activity of the renin-angiotensin system (e.g., patients with severe congestive heart failure, renal artery stenosis, or volume depletion), treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers has been associated with oliguria or progressive azotemia and rarely with acute renal failure and death. Similar results may be anticipated in patients treated with Edarbyclor [see Drug Interactions (7), Use in Specific Populations (8.6) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

In studies of ACE inhibitors in patients with unilateral or bilateral renal artery stenosis, increases in serum creatinine or blood urea nitrogen have been reported. There has been no long-term use of azilsartan medoxomil in patients with unilateral or bilateral renal artery stenosis, but similar results are expected.

Chlorthalidone

In patients with renal disease, chlorthalidone may precipitate azotemia. If progressive renal impairment becomes evident, as indicated by increased blood urea nitrogen, consider withholding or discontinuing diuretic therapy.

5.4 Serum Electrolyte Imbalances

Thiazide diuretics can cause hyponatremia and hypokalemia. Drugs that inhibit the renin angiotensin system can cause hyperkalemia. Hypokalemia is a dose-dependent adverse reaction that may develop with chlorthalidone. Co-administration of digitalis may exacerbate the adverse effects of hypokalemia. Monitor serum electrolytes periodically.

Edarbyclor attenuates chlorthalidone-associated hypokalemia. In patients with normal potassium levels at baseline, 1.7% of Edarbyclor-treated patients, 0.9% of azilsartan medoxomil-treated patients, and 13.4% of chlorthalidone-treated patients shifted to low potassium values (less than 3.4 mmol/L).

5.5 Hyperuricemia

Chlorthalidone

Hyperuricemia may occur or frank gout may be precipitated in certain patients receiving chlorthalidone or other thiazide diuretics.

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

The following potential adverse reactions with Edarbyclor, azilsartan medoxomil, or chlorthalidone and similar agents are included in more detail in the Warnings and Precautions section of the label:

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Edarbyclor has been evaluated for safety in more than 3900 patients with hypertension; more than 700 patients were treated for at least 6 months and more than 280 for at least 1 year. Adverse reactions have generally been mild and transient in nature.

Common adverse reactions that occurred in the 8-week factorial design trial in at least 2% of Edarbyclor-treated patients and greater than azilsartan medoxomil or chlorthalidone are presented in Table 1.

Table 1. Adverse Reactions Occurring at an Incidence of ≥2% of Edarbyclor-treated Patients and > Azilsartan medoxomil or Chlorthalidone
Preferred Term Azilsartan medoxomil20, 40, 80 mg(N=470) Chlorthalidone12.5, 25 mg(N=316) Edarbyclor40 / 12.5, 40 / 25 mg(N=302)
Dizziness 1.7% 1.9% 8.9%
Fatigue 0.6% 1.3% 2.0%

Hypotension and syncope were reported in 1.7% and 0.3%, respectively, of patients treated with Edarbyclor.

Study discontinuation because of adverse reactions occurred in 8.3% of patients treated with the recommended doses of Edarbyclor compared with 3.2% of patients treated with azilsartan medoxomil and 3.2% of patients treated with chlorthalidone. The most common reasons for discontinuation of therapy with Edarbyclor were serum creatinine increased (3.6%) and dizziness (2.3%).

The adverse reaction profile obtained from 52 weeks of open-label combination therapy with azilsartan medoxomil plus chlorthalidone or Edarbyclor was similar to that observed during the double-blind, active controlled trials.

In 3 double-blind, active controlled, titration studies, in which Edarbyclor was titrated to higher doses in a step-wise manner, adverse reactions and discontinuations for adverse events were less frequent than in the fixed-dose factorial trial.

Azilsartan medoxomil

A total of 4814 patients were evaluated for safety when treated with azilsartan medoxomil at doses of 20, 40 or 80 mg in clinical trials. This includes 1704 patients treated for at least 6 months, of these, 588 were treated for at least 1 year. Generally, adverse reactions were mild, not dose related and similar regardless of age, gender and race.

Adverse reactions with a plausible relationship to treatment that have been reported with an incidence of ≥0.3% and greater than placebo in more than 3300 patients treated with azilsartan medoxomil in controlled trials are listed below:

Gastrointestinal Disorders: diarrhea, nausea

General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: asthenia, fatigue

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: muscle spasm

Nervous System Disorders: dizziness, dizziness postural

Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: cough

Chlorthalidone

The following adverse reactions have been observed in clinical trials of chlorthalidone: rash, headache, dizziness, GI upset, and elevations of uric acid and cholesterol.

Clinical Laboratory Findings with Edarbyclor

In the factorial design trial, clinically relevant changes in standard laboratory parameters were uncommon with administration of the recommended doses of Edarbyclor.

Renal parameters:

Increased blood creatinine is a known pharmacologic effect of renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers, such as ARBs and ACE inhibitors, and is related to the magnitude of blood pressure reduction. The incidence of consecutive increases of creatinine ≥50% from baseline and >ULN was 2.0% in patients treated with the recommended doses of Edarbyclor compared with 0.4% and 0.3% with azilsartan medoxomil and chlorthalidone, respectively. Elevations of creatinine were typically transient, or non-progressive and reversible, and associated with large blood pressure reductions.

Mean increases in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were observed with Edarbyclor (5.3 mg/dL) compared with azilsartan medoxomil (1.5 mg/dL) and with chlorthalidone (2.5 mg/dL).

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