Ella (Page 4 of 5)

13 NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenicity:

Carcinogenicity potential was evaluated in rats and mice.

Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to ulipristal acetate daily for 99-100 weeks at doses of 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg/day, representing exposures up to 31 times higher than exposures at the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD). There were no drug-related neoplasms in male rats. In female rats, potential treatment-related neoplastic findings were limited to adrenal cortical adenomas in the intermediate dose group (3 mg/kg/day). Despite the increase, this incidence of adrenal cortical adenomas in females may not be relevant to clinical use.

Tg.rasH2 transgenic mice were exposed to ulipristal acetate for 26 weeks at doses of 5, 45, or 130 mg/kg/day, representing exposures 100 times higher than exposures at the MRHD. There was no drug-related increase in neoplasm incidence in male or female mice.

Genotoxicity: Ulipristal acetate was not genotoxic in the Ames assay, in vitro mammalian assays utilizing mouse lymphoma cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes , and in an in vivo micronucleus assay in mice.

Impairment of Fertility: Single oral doses of ulipristal acetate prevented ovulation in 50% of rats at 2 times the human exposure based on body surface area (mg/m2). Single doses of ulipristal acetate given on post-coital days 4 or 5 prevented pregnancy in 80-100% of rats and in 50% of rabbits when given on post-coital days 5 or 6 at drug exposures 4 and 12 times the human exposure based on body surface area. Lower doses administered for 4 days to rats and rabbits were also effective at preventing ovulation and pregnancy.

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

Two multicenter clinical studies evaluated the efficacy and safety of ella. An open-label study provided the primary data to support the efficacy and safety of ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception when taken 48 to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse. A single-blind comparative study provided the primary data to support the efficacy and safety of ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception when taken 0 to 72 hours after unprotected intercourse and provided supportive data for ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception when taken > 72 to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse. Women in both studies were required to have a negative pregnancy test prior to receiving emergency contraception. The primary efficacy analyses were performed on subjects less than 36 years of age who had a known pregnancy status after taking study medication.

Table 3: Summary of Clinical Trial Results for Women Who Received a Single Dose of ella (30 mg Ulipristal Acetate)
Open-Label Study 48 to 120 Hours * Single-Blind Comparative Study 0 to 72 Hours *
N = 1,242 N = 844
Expected Pregnancy Rate ** 5.5 5.6
Observed Pregnancy Rate **(95% confidence interval) 2.2(1.5, 3.2) 1.9(1.1, 3.1)

* Time after unprotected intercourse when ella was taken** Number of pregnancies per 100 women at risk for pregnancy

14.1 Open-Label Study

This study was a multicenter open-label trial conducted at 40 family planning clinics in the United States. Healthy women with a mean age of 24 years who requested emergency contraception 48 to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse received a dose of 30 mg ulipristal acetate (ella). The median BMI for the study subjects was 25.3 and ranged from 16.1 to 61.3 kg/m2.

Twenty-seven pregnancies occurred in 1,242 women aged 18 to 35 years evaluated for efficacy. The number of pregnancies expected without emergency contraception was calculated based on the timing of intercourse with regard to each woman’s menstrual cycle. ella statistically significantly reduced the pregnancy rate, from an expected rate of 5.5% to an observed rate of 2.2%, when taken 48 to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse.

14.2 Single-Blind Comparative Study

This study was a multicenter, single-blind, randomized comparison of the efficacy and safety of 30 mg ulipristal acetate (ella) to levonorgestrel (another form of emergency contraception). Subjects were enrolled at 35 sites in the U.S., the United Kingdom and Ireland, with the majority (66%) having been enrolled in the U.S. Healthy women with a mean age of 25 years who requested emergency contraception within 120 hours of unprotected intercourse were enrolled and randomly allocated to receive ella or levonorgestrel 1.5 mg. The median BMI for the study subjects was 25.3 and ranged from 14.9 to 70.0 kg/m2.

In the ella group, 16 pregnancies occurred in 844 women aged 16 to 35 years when emergency contraception was taken 0 to 72 hours after unprotected intercourse. The number of pregnancies expected without emergency contraception was calculated based on the timing of intercourse with regard to each woman’s menstrual cycle; ella statistically significantly reduced the pregnancy rate, from an expected 5.6% to an observed 1.9%, when taken within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse. There were no pregnancies observed in the women who were administered ella more than 72 hours after unprotected intercourse (10% of women who received ella).

14.3 Pooled Analysis

Data from the two studies were pooled to provide a total efficacy population of women treated with ulipristal acetate up to 120 hours after UPI. Time Trend analysis for the five 24-hour intervals from 0 to 120 hours between unprotected intercourse and treatment was conducted. There were no significant differences in the observed pregnancy rates across the five time intervals.

Subgroup analysis of the pooled data by BMI showed that for women with BMI > 30 kg/m2 (16% of all subjects), the observed pregnancy rate was 3.1% (95% CI: 1.7, 5.7), which was not significantly reduced compared to the expected pregnancy rate of 4.5% in the absence of emergency contraception taken within 120 hours after unprotected intercourse. In the comparative study, a similar effect was seen for the comparator emergency contraception drug, levonorgestrel 1.5 mg. For levonorgestrel, when used by women with BMI > 30 kg/m2 , the observed pregnancy rate was 7.4% (95% CI: 3.9, 13.4), compared to the expected pregnancy rate of 4.4% in the absence of emergency contraception taken within 72 hours after unprotected intercourse.

16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

Product: 53002-1630

NDC: 53002-1630-1 1 TABLET in a DOSE PACK

17 PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION

[See FDA- Approved Patient Labeling]

Information for Patients

  • Instruct patients to take ella as soon as possible and not more than 120 hours after unprotected intercourse or a known or suspected contraceptive failure.
  • Advise patients that they should not take ella if they know or suspect they are pregnant and that ella is not indicated for termination of an existing pregnancy.
  • Advise patients to contact their healthcare provider immediately in case of vomiting within 3 hours of taking the tablet, to discuss whether to take another tablet.
  • Advise patients to seek medical attention if they experience severe lower abdominal pain 3 to 5 weeks after taking ella , in order to be evaluated for an ectopic pregnancy.
  • Advise patients to contact their healthcare provider and consider the possibility of pregnancy if their period is delayed after taking ella by more than 1 week beyond the date it was expected.
  • Advise patients not to use ella as routine contraception, or to use it repeatedly in the same menstrual cycle.
  • Advise patients that using ella and hormonal contraceptives together can affect the effectiveness of each. Advise patients to use a reliable barrier method for all subsequent acts of intercourse until the next menstrual period. If a woman wishes to use hormonal contraception, she should do so no sooner than 5 days after intake of ella , and she should use a reliable barrier method until the next menstrual period.
  • Advise patients not to use ella if they are taking a CYP3A4 inducer.
  • Inform patients that ella does not protect against HIV infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted diseases/infections.

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