ENBREL (Page 4 of 16)

6.2 Immunogenicity

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to etanercept in the studies described below with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading.

Immunogenicity

Patients with RA, PsA, AS or PsO were tested at multiple time points for antibodies to etanercept. Antibodies to the TNF receptor portion or other protein components of the Enbrel drug product were detected at least once in sera of approximately 6% of adult patients with RA, PsA, AS or PsO. These antibodies were all non-neutralizing. Results from JIA patients were similar to those seen in adult RA patients treated with Enbrel.

In adult PsO studies that evaluated the exposure of etanercept for up to 120 weeks, the percentage of patients testing positive at the assessed time points of 24, 48, 72 and 96 weeks ranged from 3.6%-8.7% and were all non-neutralizing. The percentage of patients testing positive increased with an increase in the duration of study; however, the clinical significance of this finding is unknown. No apparent correlation of antibody development to clinical response or adverse events was observed. The immunogenicity data of Enbrel beyond 120 weeks of exposure are unknown.

In pediatric PsO studies, approximately 10% of subjects developed antibodies to etanercept by Week 48 and approximately 16% of subjects developed antibodies to etanercept by Week 264. All of these antibodies were non-neutralizing. However, because of the limitations of the immunogenicity assays, the incidence of binding and neutralizing antibodies may not have been reliably determined.

The data reflect the percentage of patients whose test results were considered positive for antibodies to etanercept in an ELISA assay, and are highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay.

Autoantibodies

Patients with RA had serum samples tested for autoantibodies at multiple time points. In RA Studies I and II, the percentage of patients evaluated for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) who developed new positive ANA (titer ≥ 1:40) was higher in patients treated with Enbrel (11%) than in placebo-treated patients (5%). The percentage of patients who developed new positive anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies was also higher by radioimmunoassay (15% of patients treated with Enbrel compared to 4% of placebo-treated patients) and by Crithidia luciliae assay (3% of patients treated with Enbrel compared to none of placebo-treated patients). The proportion of patients treated with Enbrel who developed anticardiolipin antibodies was similarly increased compared to placebo-treated patients. In RA Study III, no pattern of increased autoantibody development was seen in Enbrel patients compared to MTX patients [see Warnings and Precautions (5.9)].

6.3 Postmarketing Experience

Adverse reactions have been reported during post approval use of Enbrel in adults and pediatric patients. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to Enbrel exposure.

Adverse reactions are listed by body system below:

Blood and lymphatic system disorders: pancytopenia, anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphadenopathy, aplastic anemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)]
Cardiac disorders: congestive heart failure [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)]
Gastrointestinal disorders: inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
General disorders: angioedema, chest pain
Hepatobiliary disorders: autoimmune hepatitis, elevated transaminases, hepatitis B reactivation
Immune disorders: macrophage activation syndrome, systemic vasculitis, sarcoidosis
Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders: lupus-like syndrome
Neoplasms benign, malignant, and unspecified: melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers, Merkel cell carcinoma [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]
Nervous system disorders: convulsions, multiple sclerosis, demyelination, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, paresthesias, headache [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]
Ocular disorders: uveitis, scleritis
Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: interstitial lung disease
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: cutaneous lupus erythematosus, cutaneous vasculitis (including leukocytoclastic vasculitis), erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, subcutaneous nodule, new or worsening psoriasis (all sub-types including pustular and palmoplantar)

Opportunistic infections, including atypical mycobacterial infection, herpes zoster, aspergillosis and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, and protozoal infections have also been reported in postmarketing use.

Rare (< 0.1%) cases of IBD have been reported in JIA patients receiving Enbrel, which is not effective for the treatment of IBD.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Specific drug interaction studies have not been conducted with Enbrel.

7.1 Vaccines

Most PsA patients receiving Enbrel were able to mount effective B-cell immune responses to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, but titers in aggregate were moderately lower and fewer patients had 2-fold rises in titers compared to patients not receiving Enbrel. The clinical significance of this is unknown. Patients receiving Enbrel may receive concurrent vaccinations, except for live vaccines. No data are available on the secondary transmission of infection by live vaccines in patients receiving Enbrel.

Patients with a significant exposure to varicella virus should temporarily discontinue Enbrel therapy and be considered for prophylactic treatment with varicella zoster immune globulin [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8, 5.10)].

7.2 Immune-Modulating Biologic Products

In a study in which patients with active RA were treated for up to 24 weeks with concurrent Enbrel and anakinra therapy, a 7% rate of serious infections was observed, which was higher than that observed with Enbrel alone (0%) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)] and did not result in higher ACR response rates compared to Enbrel alone. The most common infections consisted of bacterial pneumonia (4 cases) and cellulitis (4 cases). One patient with pulmonary fibrosis and pneumonia died due to respiratory failure. Two percent of patients treated concurrently with Enbrel and anakinra developed neutropenia (ANC < 1 × 109 /L).

In clinical studies, concurrent administration of abatacept and Enbrel resulted in increased incidences of serious adverse events, including infections, and did not demonstrate increased clinical benefit [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)].

7.3 Cyclophosphamide

The use of Enbrel in patients receiving concurrent cyclophosphamide therapy is not recommended [see Warnings and Precautions (5.11)].

7.4 Sulfasalazine

Patients in a clinical study who were on established therapy with sulfasalazine, to which Enbrel was added, were noted to develop a mild decrease in mean neutrophil counts in comparison to groups treated with either Enbrel or sulfasalazine alone. The clinical significance of this observation is unknown.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Available studies with use of etanercept during pregnancy do not reliably support an association between etanercept and major birth defects. Clinical data are available from the Organization of Teratology Information Specialists (OTIS) Enbrel Pregnancy Registry in women with rheumatic diseases or psoriasis and a Scandinavian study in pregnant women with chronic inflammatory disease. Both the OTIS Registry and the Scandinavian study showed the proportion of liveborn infants with major birth defects was higher for women exposed to etanercept compared to diseased etanercept unexposed women. However, the lack of pattern of major birth defects is reassuring and differences between exposure groups (e.g. disease severity) may have impacted the occurrence of birth defects (see Data). In animal reproduction studies with pregnant rats and rabbits, no fetal harm or malformations were observed with subcutaneous administration of etanercept during the period of organogenesis at doses that achieved systemic exposures 48 to 58 times the exposure in patients treated with 50 mg Enbrel once weekly (see Data).

All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. In the United States, about 2-4% of liveborn babies have a major birth defect and about 15-20% of pregnancies end in miscarriage, regardless of drug exposure.

Clinical Considerations

Fetal/Neonatal adverse reactions

The risk of fetal/neonatal adverse reactions with in utero exposure to Enbrel is unknown. Risks and benefits should be considered prior to administering live or live-attenuated vaccines to infants exposed to Enbrel in utero [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)].

Data

Human Data

A prospective cohort pregnancy registry conducted by OTIS in the US and Canada between 2000 and 2012 compared the risk of major birth defects in liveborn infants of women with rheumatic diseases or psoriasis exposed to etanercept in the first trimester. The proportion of major birth defects among liveborn infants in the etanercept-exposed (N = 319) and diseased etanercept unexposed cohorts (N = 144) was 9.4% and 3.5%, respectively. The findings showed no statistically significant increased risk of minor birth defects and no pattern of major or minor birth defects.

A Scandinavian study compared the risk of major birth defects in liveborn infants of women with chronic inflammatory disease (CID) exposed to TNF-inhibitors during early pregnancy. Women were identified from the Danish (2004-2012) and Swedish (2006-2012) population based health registers. The proportion of major birth defects among liveborn infants in the etanercept-exposed (N = 344) and CID etanercept unexposed cohorts (N = 21,549) was 7.0% and 4.7%, respectively.

Overall, while both the OTIS Registry and Scandinavian study show a higher proportion of major birth defects in etanercept-exposed patients compared to diseased etanercept unexposed patients, the lack of pattern of birth defects is reassuring and differences between exposure groups (e.g. disease severity) may have impacted the occurrence of birth defects.

Three case reports from the literature showed that cord blood levels of etanercept at delivery, in infants born to women administered etanercept during pregnancy, were between 3% and 32% of the maternal serum level.

Animal Data

In embryofetal development studies with etanercept administered during the period of organogenesis to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 6 through 20 or pregnant rabbits from GD 6 through 18, there was no evidence of fetal malformations or embryotoxicity in rats or rabbits at respective doses that achieved systemic exposures 48 to 58 times the exposure in patients treated with 50 mg Enbrel once weekly (on an AUC basis with maternal subcutaneous doses up to 30 mg/kg/day in rats and 40 mg/kg/day in rabbits). In a peri-and post-natal development study with pregnant rats that received etanercept during organogenesis and the later gestational period from GD 6 through 21, development of pups through post-natal day 4 was unaffected at doses that achieved exposures 48 times the exposure in patients treated with 50 mg Enbrel once weekly (on an AUC basis with maternal subcutaneous doses up to 30 mg/kg/day).

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