EVRYSDI (Page 2 of 6)

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Effect of EVRYSDI on Substrates of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion (MATE) Protein Transporters

Based on in vitro data, EVRYSDI may increase plasma concentrations of drugs eliminated via MATE1 or MATE2-K [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)] , such as metformin. Avoid coadministration of EVRYSDI with MATE substrates. If coadministration cannot be avoided, monitor for drug-related toxicities and consider dosage reduction of the coadministered drug (based on the labeling of that drug) if needed.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no adequate data on the developmental risk associated with the use of EVRYSDI in pregnant women. In animal studies, administration of risdiplam during pregnancy or throughout pregnancy and lactation resulted in adverse effects on development (embryofetal mortality, malformations, decreased fetal body weights, and reproductive impairment in offspring) at or above clinically relevant drug exposures [see Data].

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated populations is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defect and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2% to 4% and 15% to 20%, respectively. Based on animal data, advise pregnant women of the potential risk to the fetus.

Data

Animal Data

Oral administration of risdiplam (0, 1, 3, or 7.5 mg/kg/day) to pregnant rats throughout organogenesis resulted in decreased fetal body weights and increased incidences of fetal structural variations at the highest dose tested, which was not associated with maternal toxicity. The no-effect level for adverse effects on embryofetal development (3 mg/kg/day) was associated with maternal plasma exposure (AUC) approximately 2 times that in humans at the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 5 mg.

Oral administration of risdiplam (0, 1, 4, or 12 mg/kg/day) to pregnant rabbits throughout organogenesis resulted in embryofetal mortality, fetal malformations (hydrocephaly), and structural variations at the highest dose tested, which was associated with maternal toxicity. The no-effect dose for adverse effects on embryofetal development (4 mg/kg/day) was associated with maternal plasma exposure (AUC) approximately 4 times that in humans at the MRHD.

When risdiplam (0, 0.75, 1.5, or 3 mg/kg/day) was orally administered to rats throughout pregnancy and lactation, gestation was prolonged in the dams, and delayed sexual maturation (vaginal opening) and impaired reproductive function (decreased numbers of corpora lutea, implantation sites, and live embryos) were observed in female offspring at the highest dose. The no-effect dose for adverse effects on pre- and postnatal development in rats (1.5 mg/kg/day) was associated with maternal plasma exposure (AUC) similar to that in humans at the MRHD.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data on the presence of risdiplam in human milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Risdiplam was excreted in the milk of lactating rats orally administered risdiplam.

The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for EVRYSDI and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from EVRYSDI or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Studies of risdiplam in juvenile and adult rats and in monkeys demonstrated adverse effects on the reproductive organs, including germ cells, in males at clinically-relevant plasma exposures [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4) and Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)].

Pregnancy Testing

Pregnancy testing is recommended for females of reproductive potential prior to initiating EVRYSDI [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].

Contraception

EVRYSDI may cause embryofetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].

Female Patients

Advise female patients of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with EVRYSDI and for at least 1 month after her last dose.

Infertility

Male Patients

Male fertility may be compromised by treatment with EVRYSDI [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1)] .

Counsel male patients of reproductive potential receiving EVRYSDI about the potential effects on fertility. Male patients may consider sperm preservation prior to treatment.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of EVRYSDI in pediatric patients (neonates and older) have been established. Use of EVRYSDI for SMA is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies of EVRYSDI in patients 2 months of age and older with SMA. Use of EVRYSDI for SMA in patients 2 months of age and younger is supported by pharmacokinetic and safety data from pediatric patients 16 days and older, and pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation to identify the dosing regimen [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3) and Clinical Studies (14)].

Juvenile Animal Toxicity Data

Oral administration of risdiplam (0, 0.75, 1.5, 2.5 mg/kg/day) to young rats from postnatal day (PND) 4 through PND 31 resulted in decreased growth (body weight, tibia length) and delayed sexual maturation in males at the mid and high dose. The skeletal and body weight deficits persisted after cessation of dosing. Ophthalmic changes consisting of vacuoles in the anterior vitreous were seen at the high dose. Decreases in absolute B lymphocyte counts were observed at all doses after cessation of dosing. Decreases in testis and epididymis weights, which correlated with degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis, occurred at the mid and high doses; the histopathology findings were reversible, but organ weight persisted after cessation of dosing. Impaired female reproductive performance (decreased mating index, fertility index, and conception rate) was observed at the high dose. A no-effect dose for adverse developmental effects on preweaning rats was not identified. The lowest dose tested (0.75 mg/kg/day) was associated with plasma exposures (AUC) lower than that in humans at the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) of 5 mg/day.

Oral administration of risdiplam (0, 1, 3, or 7.5 mg/kg/day) to young rats from PND 22 through PND 112 produced a marked increase in micronuclei in the bone marrow, male reproductive organ histopathology (degeneration/necrosis of the seminiferous tubule epithelium, oligo/aspermia in the epididymis, spermatic granulomas), and adverse effects on sperm parameters (decreased sperm concentration and motility, increased sperm morphology abnormalities) at the highest dose tested. Increases in T lymphocytes (total, helper, and cytotoxic) were observed at the mid and high doses. The reproductive and immune effects persisted after cessation of dosing. The no-effect dose (1 mg/kg/day) for adverse effects on postweaning juvenile rats was associated with plasma exposures (AUC) lower than that in humans at the MRHD.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of EVRYSDI did not include patients aged 65 years and older to determine whether they respond differently from younger adult patients.

11 DESCRIPTION

EVRYSDI for oral solution contains risdiplam, which is a survival of motor neuron 2 (SMN2)-directed RNA splicing modifier.

The chemical name of risdiplam is 7-(4,7-diazaspiro[2.5]octan-7-yl)-2-(2,8 dimethylimidazo[1,2-b]pyridazin-6-yl)pyrido-4H-[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-one. Risdiplam has a molecular weight of 401.46 g/mol.

The molecular formula of risdiplam is C22 H23 N7 O and the chemical structure is shown below.

Chemical Structure
(click image for full-size original)

EVRYSDI is supplied as a powder in an amber glass bottle. Each bottle contains 60 mg of risdiplam. The inactive ingredients of EVRYSDI are: ascorbic acid, disodium edetate dihydrate, isomalt, mannitol, polyethylene glycol 6000, sodium benzoate, strawberry flavor, sucralose, and tartaric acid.

The powder is constituted with purified water to yield 60 mg/80 mL (0.75 mg/mL) of risdiplam after constitution [see Dosage and Administration (2.4)].

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