Feldene (Page 4 of 4)

Pregnancy category C

Reproductive studies conducted in rats and rabbits have not demonstrated evidence of developmental abnormalities. However, animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Piroxicam capsules are not recommended for use in pregnant women since safety has not been established in humans. Piroxicam capsules should be used in pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nonteratogenic Effects

Because of the known effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the fetal cardiovascular system (closure of ductus arteriosus), use during pregnancy (particularly late pregnancy) should be avoided. In animal studies of piroxicam, gastrointestinal tract toxicity was increased in pregnant females in the last trimester of pregnancy compared to nonpregnant females or females in earlier trimesters of pregnancy.

Labor and Delivery

In rat studies with NSAIDs, as with other drugs known to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, an increased incidence of dystocia, delayed parturition, and decreased pup survival occurred. The effects of piroxicam on labor and delivery in pregnant women are unknown.

Nursing Mothers

Piroxicam is excreted into human milk. The presence in breast milk has been determined during initial and long-term conditions (52 days). Piroxicam appeared in breast milk at about 1% to 3% of the maternal concentration. No accumulation of piroxicam occurred in milk relative to that in plasma during treatment. Piroxicam capsules are not recommended for use in nursing mothers.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

As with any NSAID, caution should be exercised in treating the elderly (65 years and older). Most spontaneous reports of fatal GI events with NSAIDs are in the elderly or debilitated patients and, therefore, care should be taken in treating this population. In addition to a past history of ulcer disease, older age and poor general health status (among other factors) may increase the risk for GI bleeding. To minimize the potential risk of an adverse GI event, the lowest effective dose should be used for the shortest possible duration (see WARNINGS , Gastrointestinal Effects – Risk of GI Ulceration , Bleeding and Perforation).

As with all other NSAIDs, there is a risk of developing renal toxicity in patients in which renal prostaglandins have a compensatory role in maintenance of renal perfusion. Discontinuation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy is usually followed by recovery to the pretreatment state (see WARNINGS , Renal Effects).

In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting a greater frequency of impaired drug elimination and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

In patients taking piroxicam capsules or other NSAIDs, the most frequently reported adverse experiences occurring in approximately 1 to 10% of patients are:

Cardiovascular System: Edema.

Digestive System: Anorexia, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, dyspepsia, elevated liver enzymes, flatulence, gross bleeding/perforation, heartburn, nausea, ulcers (gastric/duodenal), vomiting.

Hemic and Lymphatic System: Anemia, increased bleeding time.

Nervous System: Dizziness, headache.

Skin and Appendages: Pruritus, rash.

Special Senses: Tinnitus.

Urogenital System: Abnormal renal function.

Additional adverse experiences reported occasionally include:

Body As a Whole: Fever, infection, sepsis.

Cardiovascular System: Congestive heart failure, hypertension, tachycardia, syncope.

Digestive System: Dry mouth, esophagitis, gastritis, glossitis, hematemesis, hepatitis, jaundice, melena, rectal bleeding, stomatitis.

Hemic and Lymphatic System: Ecchymosis, eosinophilia, epistaxis, leukopenia, purpura, petechial rash, thrombocytopenia.

Metabolic and Nutritional: Weight changes.

Nervous System: Anxiety, asthenia, confusion, depression, dream abnormalities, drowsiness, insomnia, malaise, nervousness, paresthesia, somnolence, tremors, vertigo.

Respiratory System: Asthma, dyspnea.

Skin and Appendages: Alopecia, bruising, desquamation, erythema, photosensitivity, sweat.

Special Senses: Blurred vision.

Urogenital System: Cystitis, dysuria, hematuria, hyperkalemia, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, oliguria/polyuria, proteinuria, renal failure.

Other adverse reactions which occur rarely are:

Body As a Whole: Anaphylactic reactions, appetite changes, death, flu-like syndrome, pain (colic), serum sickness.

Cardiovascular System: Arrhythmia, exacerbation of angina, hypotension, myocardial infarction, palpitations, vasculitis.

Digestive System: Eructation, liver failure, pancreatitis.

Hemic and Lymphatic System: Agranulocytosis, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, lymphadenopathy, pancytopenia.

Hypersensitivity: Positive ANA.

Metabolic and Nutritional: Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia.

Nervous System: Akathisia, convulsions, coma, hallucinations, meningitis, mood alterations.

Respiratory: Respiratory depression, pneumonia.

Skin and Appendages: Angioedema, toxic epidermal necrosis, erythema multiforme, exfoliative dermatitis, onycholysis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, vesiculobullous reaction.

Special Senses: Conjunctivitis, hearing impairment, swollen eyes.

OVERDOSAGE

Symptoms following acute NSAID overdoses are usually limited to lethargy, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and epigastric pain, which are generally reversible with supportive care. Gastrointestinal bleeding can occur. Hypertension, acute renal failure, respiratory depression, and coma may occur, but are rare. Anaphylactoid reactions have been reported with therapeutic ingestion of NSAIDs, and may occur following an overdose.

Patients should be managed by symptomatic and supportive care following an NSAID overdose. There are no specific antidotes. Emesis and/or activated charcoal (60 to 100 g in adults, 1 to 2 g/kg in children) and/or osmotic cathartic may be indicated. The long plasma half-life of piroxicam should be considered when treating an overdose with piroxicam. Experiments in dogs have demonstrated that the use of multiple-dose treatments with activated charcoal could reduce the half-life of piroxicam by more than 50% and systemic bioavailability by as much as 37% when activated charcoal is given as late as 6 hours after ingestion of piroxicam. Forced diuresis, alkalinization of urine, hemodialysis, or hemoperfusion may not be useful due to high protein binding.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of piroxicam capsules and other treatment options before deciding to use piroxicam capsules. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see WARNINGS).

After observing the response to initial therapy with piroxicam capsules, the dose and frequency should be adjusted to suit an individual patient’s needs.

For the relief of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, the recommended dose is 20 mg given orally once per day. If desired, the daily dose may be divided. Because of the long half-life of piroxicam capsules, steady-state blood levels are not reached for 7 to 12 days. Therefore, although the therapeutic effects of piroxicam are evident early in treatment, there is a progressive increase in response over several weeks and the effect of therapy should not be assessed for two weeks.

HOW SUPPLIED

Piroxicam capsules USP, 20 mg are a #2 capsule with a dark green cap and a dark green body imprinted “93” “756” on the cap and body. They are available in bottles of 15.

Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature].

Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container as defined in the USP with a child-resistant closure (as required).

Manufactured for:
Keltman Pharmaceuticals Inc.
1 Lakeland Square, Suite A
Flowood, Ms 39232


R4

Medication Guide f o r Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs )

Rx only

( See the end of this Medication Guide for a list of prescription NSAID medicines .)

What is the most important information I should know about medicines called Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)?

NSAID medicines may increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke that can lead to death. This chance increases:

  • with longer use of NSAID medicines
  • in people who have heart disease

NSAID medicines should never be used right before or after a heart surgery called a “coronary artery bypass graft (CABG).”

NSAID medicines can cause ulcers and bleeding in the stomach and intestines at any time during treatment. Ulcers and bleeding:

  • can happen without warning symptoms
  • may cause death

The chance of a person getting an ulcer or bleeding increases with:

  • taking medicines called “corticosteroids” and “anticoagulants”
  • longer use
  • smoking
  • drinking alcohol
  • older age
  • having poor health

NSAID medicines should only be used:

  • exactly as prescribed
  • at the lowest dose possible for your treatment
  • for the shortest time needed

What are Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)?

NSAID medicines are used to treat pain and redness, swelling, and heat (inflammation) from medical conditions such as:

  • different types of arthritis
  • menstrual cramps and other types of short-term pain

Who should not take a Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)?

Do not take an NSAID medicine:

  • if you had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergic reaction with aspirin or any other NSAID medicine
  • for pain right before or after heart bypass surgery

Tell your healthcare provider:

  • about all of your medical conditions.
  • about all of the medicines you take. NSAIDs and some other medicines can interact with each other and cause serious side effects. Keep a list of your medicines to show to your healthcare provider and pharmacist.
  • if you are pregnant. NSAID medicines should not be used by pregnant women late in their pregnancy.
  • if you are breastfeeding. Talk to your doctor.

What are the possible side effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)?

Serious Side effects include: Other side effects include:
• heart attack • stomach pain
• stroke • constipation
• high blood pressure • diarrhea
• heart failure from body swelling (fluid retention) • gas
• kidney problems including kidney failure • heartburn
• bleeding and ulcers in the stomach and intestine • nausea
• low red blood cells (anemia) • vomiting
• life-threatening skin reactions • dizziness
• life-threatening allergic reactions
• liver problems including liver failure
• asthma attacks in people who have asthma

Get emergency help right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • shortness of breath or trouble breathing
  • chest pain
  • weakness in one part or side of your body
  • slurred speech
  • swelling of the face or throat

Stop your NSAID medicine and call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • nausea
  • more tired or weaker than usual
  • itching
  • your skin or eyes look yellow
  • stomach pain
  • flu-like symptoms
  • vomit blood
  • there is blood in your bowel movement or it is black and sticky like tar
  • unusual weight gain
  • skin rash or blisters with fever
  • swelling of the arms and legs, hands and feet

These are not all the side effects with NSAID medicines. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist for more information about NSAID medicines.

Other information about Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

  • Aspirin is an NSAID medicine but it does not increase the chance of a heart attack. Aspirin can cause bleeding in the brain, stomach, and intestines. Aspirin can also cause ulcers in the stomach and intestines.
  • Some of these NSAID medicines are sold in lower doses without a prescription (over-the-counter). Talk to your healthcare provider before using over-the-counter NSAIDs for more than 10 days.
NSAID medicines that need a prescription
*
Vicoprofen contains the same dose of ibuprofen as over-the-counter (OTC) NSAIDs, and is usually used for less than 10 days to treat pain. The OTC label warns that long term continuous use may increase the risk of heart attack or stroke.
Generic Name Tradename
Celecoxib Celebrex
Diclofenac Cataflam, Voltaren, Arthrotec (combined with misoprostol)
Diflunisal Dolobid
Etodolac Lodine, Lodine XL
Fenoprofen Nalfon, Nalfon 200
Flurbiprofen Ansaid
Ibuprofen Motrin, Tab-Profen, Vicoprofen * (combined with hydrocodone), Combunox (combined with oxycodone)
Indomethacin Indocin, Indocin SR, Indo-Lemmon, Indomethagan
Ketoprofen Oruvail
Ketorolac Toradol
Mefenamic Acid Ponstel
Meloxicam Mobic
Nabumetone Relafen
Naproxen Naprosyn, Anaprox, Anaprox DS, EC-Naproxyn, Naprelan, Naprapac (copackaged with lansoprazole)
Oxaprozin Daypro
Piroxicam Feldene
Sulindac Clinoril
Tolmetin Tolectin, Tolectin DS, Tolectin 600

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Manufactured for:
Keltman Pharmaceuticals Inc.
1 Lakeland Square, Suite A
Flowood, Ms 39232


R4

Package Label — Principal Display Panel – 15-count Bottle, 20 mg Capsules

NDC 68387-700-15

Rx Only

piroxicam capsule
(click image for full-size original)
FELDENE
piroxicam capsule
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:68387-700
Route of Administration ORAL DEA Schedule
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
Piroxicam (Piroxicam) Piroxicam 20 mg
Inactive Ingredients
Ingredient Name Strength
COLLOIDAL SILICON DIOXIDE
STARCH, CORN
D&C YELLOW NO. 10
FD&C GREEN NO. 3
GELATIN
LACTOSE
MAGNESIUM STEARATE
POVIDONE
SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE
TITANIUM DIOXIDE
Product Characteristics
Color GREEN (dark green) Score no score
Shape CAPSULE Size 18mm
Flavor Imprint Code 93;756
Contains
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:68387-700-15 15 CAPSULE (CAPSULE) in 1 BOTTLE None
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
ANDA ANDA074131 09/18/2007
Labeler — Keltman Pharmaceuticals Inc. (362861077)
Establishment
Name Address ID/FEI Operations
Teva Pharmaceutical Ind. Ltd 533065806 MANUFACTURE

Revised: 02/2010 Keltman Pharmaceuticals Inc.

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