Fenovar (Page 4 of 10)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

In non-U.S. postmarketing surveillance, the following adverse reactions have been reported during post-approval use of diclofenac sodium topical solution. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Body as a Whole: abdominal pain, accidental injury, allergic reaction, asthenia, back pain, body odor, chest pain, edema, face edema, halitosis, headache, lack of drug effect, neck rigidity, pain

Cardiovascular: palpitation, cardiovascular disorder

Digestive: diarrhea, dry mouth, dyspepsia, gastroenteritis, decreased appetite, mouth ulceration, nausea, rectal hemorrhage, ulcerative stomatitis

Metabolic and Nutritional: creatinine increased

Musculoskeletal: leg cramps, myalgia

Nervous: depression, dizziness, drowsiness, lethargy, paresthesia, paresthesia at application site

Respiratory: asthma, dyspnea, laryngismus, laryngitis, pharyngitis

Skin and Appendages: At the Application Site: Adverse Reactions: contact dermatitis, contact dermatitis with vesicles, dry skin, pruritus, rash; Other Skin and Appendages: eczema, rash, pruritus, skin discoloration, urticaria

Special Senses: abnormal vision, blurred vision, cataract, ear pain, eye disorder, eye pain, taste perversion

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

See Table 2 for clinically significant drug interactions with diclofenac.

Table 2: Clinically Significant Drug Interactions with Diclofenac

Drugs That Interfere with Hemostasis

Clinical Impact:

  • Diclofenac and anticoagulants such as warfarin have a synergistic effect on bleeding. The concomitant use of diclofenac and anticoagulants have an increased risk of serious bleeding compared to the use of either drug alone.
  • Serotonin release by platelets plays an important role in hemostasis. Case-control and cohort epidemiological studies showed that concomitant use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and an NSAID may potentiate the risk of bleeding more than an NSAID alone.

Intervention:

Monitor patients with concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution with anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin), antiplatelet agents (e.g., aspirin), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) for signs of bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)]

Aspirin

Clinical Impact:

Controlled clinical studies showed that the concomitant use of NSAIDs and analgesic doses of aspirin does not produce any greater therapeutic effect than the use of NSAIDs alone. In a clinical study, the concomitant use of an NSAID and aspirin was associated with a significantly increased incidence of GI adverse reactions as compared to use of NSAID alone [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]

Intervention:

Concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and analgesic doses of aspirin is not generally recommended because of the increased risk of bleeding [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)]. Diclofenac sodium topical solution is not a substitute for low dose aspirin for cardiovascular protection.

ACE inhibitors, Angiotensin Receptor Blockers, and Beta-Blockers

Clinical Impact:

  • NSAIDs may diminish the antihypertensive effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), or beta-blockers (including propranolol).
  • In patients who are elderly, volume-depleted (including those on diuretic therapy), or have renal impairment, co-administration of an NSAID with ACE inhibitors or ARBs may result in deterioration of renal function, including possible acute renal failure. These effects are usually reversible.

Intervention:

  • During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and ACE-inhibitors, ARBs, or beta-blockers, monitor blood pressure to ensure that the desired blood pressure is obtained.
  • During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and ACE-inhibitors or ARBs in patients who are elderly, volume-depleted, or have impaired renal function, monitor for signs of worsening renal function [see Warnings and Precautions(5.6)]
  • When these drugs are administered concomitantly, patients should be adequately hydrated. Assess renal function at the beginning of the concomitant treatment and periodically thereafter.

Diuretics

Clinical Impact:

Clinical studies, as well as post-marketing observations, showed that NSAIDS reduced the natriuretic effect of loop diuretics (e.g., furosemide) and thiazide diuretics in some patients. This effect has been attributed to the NSAID inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis.

Intervention:

During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution with diuretics, observe patients for signs of worsening renal function, in addition to assuring diuretic efficacy including antihypertensive effects [see Warnings and Precautions (5.6)].

Digoxin

Clinical Impact:

The concomitant use of diclofenac with digoxin has been reported to increase the serum concentration and prolong the half-life digoxin.

Intervention:

During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and digoxin, monitor serum digoxin levels.

Lithium

Clinical Impact:

NSAIDS have produced elevations in plasma lithium levels and reductions in renal lithium clearance. The mean minimum lithium concentration increased 15%, and the renal clearance decreased by approximately 20%. This effect has been attributed to NSAID inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis.

Intervention:

During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and lithium, monitor patients for signs of lithium toxicity.

Methotrexate

Clinical Impact:

Concomitant use of NSAIDs and methotrexate may increase the risk of methotrexate toxicity (e.g., neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction).

Intervention:

During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and methotrexate, monitor patients for methotrexate toxicity.

Cyclosporine

Clinical Impact:

Concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and cyclosporine may increase cyclosporine’s nephrotoxicity.

Intervention:

During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and cyclosporine, monitor patients for signs or worsening renal function.

NSAIDs and Salicylates

Clinical Impact:

Concomitant use of diclofenac with other NSAIDs or salicylates (e.g., diflunisal, salsalate) increases the risk of GI toxicity, with little or no increase in efficacy [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Concomitant use of oral NSAIDs with diclofenac sodium topical solution has been evaluated in one Phase 3 controlled trial and in combination with oral diclofenac, compared to oral diclofenac alone, resulted in a higher rate of rectal hemorrhage (3% vs. less than 1%), and more frequent abnormal creatinine (12% vs. 7%), urea (20% vs. 12%) and hemoglobin (13% vs. 9%).

Intervention:

The concomitant use of diclofenac with other NSAIDs or salicyclates is not recommended. Do not use combination therapy with diclofenac sodium topical solution and an oral NSAID unless the benefit outweighs the risk and conduct periodic laboratory evaluations

Pemetrexed

Clinical Impact:

Concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and pemetrexed may increase the risk of pemetrexed-associated myelosuppression, renal, and GI toxicity (see the pemetrexed prescribing information).

Intervention:

During concomitant use of diclofenac sodium topical solution and pemetrexed, in patients with renal impairment whose creatinine clearance ranges from 45 to 79 mL/min, monitor for myelosuppression, renal and GI toxicity.

NSAIDs with short elimination half-lives (e.g., diclofenac, indomethacin) should be avoided for a period of two days before, the day of, and two days following administration pemetrexed.

In the absence of data regarding potential interaction between pemetrexed and NSAIDs with longer half-lives (e.g., meloxicam, nabumetone), patients taking these NSAIDs should interrupt dosing for at least five days before, the day of, and two days following pemetrexed administration.

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