Ferrlecit (Page 2 of 4)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

In the single-dose, postmarketing, safety study, 11% of patients who received Ferrlecit and 9.4% of patients who received placebo reported adverse reactions. The most frequent adverse reactions following Ferrlecit administration were: hypotension (2%), nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea (2%), pain (0.7%), hypertension (0.6%), allergic reaction (0.5%), chest pain (0.5%), pruritus (0.5%), and back pain (0.4%). The following additional events were reported in two or more patients: hypertonia, nervousness, dry mouth, and hemorrhage.

In the multiple-dose, open-label surveillance study, 28% of the patients received concomitant angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy. The incidences of both drug intolerance and suspected allergic events following first dose Ferrlecit administration were 1.6% in patients with concomitant ACEI use compared to 0.7% in patients without concomitant ACEI use. The patient with a life-threatening event was not on ACEI therapy. One patient had facial flushing immediately on Ferrlecit exposure. No hypotension occurred and the event resolved rapidly and spontaneously without intervention other than drug withdrawal.

The following additional adverse reactions have been identified with the use of Ferrlecit from postmarketing spontaneous reports: anaphylactic-type reactions, shock, loss of consciousness, generalized convulsion, fetal bradycardia due to severe maternal hypotension or shock, superficial thrombophlebitis at injection site, skin discoloration, pallor, phlebitis, dysgeusia, and hypoesthesia.

Individual doses exceeding 125 mg may be associated with a higher incidence and/or severity of adverse events based on information from postmarketing spontaneous reports. These adverse events included hypotension, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dizziness, dyspnea, urticaria, chest pain, paresthesia, and peripheral swelling.

Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Drug-drug interactions involving Ferrlecit have not been studied. Ferrlecit may reduce the absorption of concomitantly administered oral iron preparations.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Parenteral iron administration may be associated with hypersensitivity reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] , which may have serious consequences, such as fetal bradycardia (see Clinical Considerations). Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to the fetus. Available data from postmarketing reports with Ferrlecit use in pregnancy are insufficient to assess the risk of major birth defects and miscarriage.

Ferrlecit contains benzyl alcohol as a preservative. Because benzyl alcohol is rapidly metabolized by a pregnant woman, benzyl alcohol exposure in the fetus is unlikely. However, adverse reactions have occurred in premature neonates and low-birth-weight infants who received intravenously administered benzyl alcohol–containing drugs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4) and Use in Specific Populations (8.4)]. Consider alternative iron replacement therapies without benzyl alcohol.

There are risks to the mother and fetus associated with untreated iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations).

In the absence of maternal toxicity, Ferrlecit was not teratogenic to offspring of pregnant mice or rats at clinically relevant exposures (see Data).

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies have a background risk of birth defects, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2%–4% and 15%–20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-associated maternal and/or embryo/fetal risk

Untreated iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal outcomes such as postpartum anemia. Adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with IDA include increased risk for preterm delivery and low birth weight.

Fetal/Neonatal adverse reactions

Severe adverse reactions including circulatory failure (severe hypotension, shock including in the context of anaphylactic reaction) may occur in pregnant women with intravenous iron administration, which may have serious consequences on the fetus such as fetal bradycardia, especially during the second and third trimesters.

Data

Animal data

Ferrlecit was administered intravenously to pregnant mice during gestation days 6 to 15 at doses of 5, 30, and 100 mg Fe/kg/day to assess embryofetal development. No teratogenic effects were seen in offspring at the highest dose, representing maternal exposure of approximately 4 times maximum human exposure based on body surface area. There were increased fetal resorptions and decreased fetal weights at doses that caused maternal toxicity as evidenced by decreased body-weight gain and decreased food consumption.

Ferrlecit was administered intravenously to pregnant rats during gestation days 6 to 15 at doses of 4 and 20 mg Fe/kg/day to assess embryofetal development. No teratogenic effects were seen in offspring at the highest dose, representing maternal exposure of approximately 1.5 times maximum human exposure based on body surface area. There were decreases in gestation index and litter size, increased fetal resorptions, and decreased fetal weights at doses that caused maternal toxicity as evidenced by decreased body-weight gain and decreased food consumption.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

Ferrlecit contains benzyl alcohol. Because benzyl alcohol is rapidly metabolized by a lactating woman, benzyl alcohol exposure in the breastfed infant is unlikely. However, adverse reactions have occurred in premature neonates and low-birth-weight infants who received intravenously administered benzyl alcohol–containing drugs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4) and Use in Specific Populations (8.4)]. Consider alternative iron replacement therapies without benzyl alcohol for use during lactation.

There are no available data on the presence of Ferrlecit in human or animal milk, the effects on milk production, or the effects on the breastfed child.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of Ferrlecit have been established in pediatric patients 6 to 15 years of age [see Dosage and Administration (2.2), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), and Clinical Studies (14)]. Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients younger than 6 years of age have not been established.

Benzyl Alcohol Toxicity and Pediatrics

Ferrlecit is not approved for use in neonates or infants. Serious adverse reactions including fatal reactions and the “gasping syndrome” occurred in premature neonates and low-birth-weight infants in the neonatal intensive care unit who received drugs containing benzyl alcohol as a preservative. In these cases, benzyl alcohol dosages of 99 to 234 mg/kg/day produced high levels of benzyl alcohol and its metabolites in the blood and urine (blood levels of benzyl alcohol were 0.61 to 1.378 mmol/L). Additional adverse reactions included gradual neurological deterioration, seizures, intracranial hemorrhage, hematologic abnormalities, skin breakdown, hepatic and renal failure, hypotension, bradycardia, and cardiovascular collapse. Benzyl alcohol contained in Ferrlecit may cause serious and anaphylactoid reactions in infants and children up to 3 years old. The administration of medications containing benzyl alcohol to newborns or premature neonates has been associated with a fatal “gasping syndrome” (symptoms include a striking onset of gasping syndrome, hypotension, bradycardia, and cardiovascular collapse). Preterm, low-birth-weight infants may be more likely to develop these reactions because they could be less able to metabolize benzyl alcohol. The minimum amount of benzyl alcohol at which serious adverse reactions may occur is not known (Ferrlecit contains 9 mg of benzyl alcohol per mL) [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of Ferrlecit did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

All MedLibrary.org resources are included in as near-original form as possible, meaning that the information from the original provider has been rendered here with only typographical or stylistic modifications and not with any substantive alterations of content, meaning or intent.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only, in accordance with our Terms of Use, and is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a medical doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner or other qualified health professional.

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2021. All Rights Reserved.