GEMTESA

GEMTESA- vibegron tablet, film coated
Urovant Sciences, Inc.

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

GEMTESA® is indicated for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and urinary frequency in adults.

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 Recommended Dosage

The recommended dosage of GEMTESA is one 75 mg tablet orally, once daily with or without food. Swallow GEMTESA tablets whole with a glass of water.

In adults, GEMTESA tablets also may be crushed, mixed with a tablespoon (approximately 15 mL) of applesauce and taken immediately with a glass of water [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Tablets: 75 mg, oval, light green, film-coated, debossed with V75 on one side and no debossing on the other side.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

GEMTESA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to vibegron or any components of the product [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)].

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Urinary Retention

Urinary retention has been reported in patients taking GEMTESA. The risk of urinary retention may be increased in patients with bladder outlet obstruction and also in patients taking muscarinic antagonist medications for the treatment of OAB. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of urinary retention, particularly in patients with bladder outlet obstruction and patients taking muscarinic antagonist medications for the treatment of OAB. Discontinue GEMTESA in patients who develop urinary retention [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)].

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

The following clinically significant adverse reaction is described elsewhere in the labeling:

6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The safety of GEMTESA was evaluated in a 12-week, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study (Study 3003) in patients with OAB [see Clinical Studies (14)]. A total of 545 patients received GEMTESA. The majority of the patients were Caucasian (78%) and female (85%) with a mean age of 60 years (range 18 to 93 years).

Adverse reactions that were reported in Study 3003 at an incidence greater than placebo and in ≥2% of patients treated with GEMTESA are listed in Table 1.

Table 1: Adverse Reactions, Exceeding Placebo Rate, Reported in ≥2% of Patients Treated with GEMTESA 75 mg for up to 12 Weeks in Study 3003
GEMTESA 75 mg n (%) Placebo n (%)
Number of Patients 545 540
Headache 22 (4.0) 13 (2.4)
Nasopharyngitis 15 (2.8) 9 (1.7)
Diarrhea 12 (2.2) 6 (1.1)
Nausea 12 (2.2) 6 (1.1)
Upper respiratory tract infection 11 (2.0) 4 (0.7)

Other adverse reactions reported in <2% of patients treated with GEMTESA included:

Gastrointestinal disorders: dry mouth, constipation

Investigations: residual urine volume increased

Renal and urinary disorders: urinary retention

Vascular disorders: hot flush

GEMTESA was also evaluated for long-term safety in an extension study (Study 3004) in 505 patients who completed the 12-week study (Study 3003). Of the 273 patients who received GEMTESA 75 mg once daily in the extension study, 181 patients were treated for a total of one year.

Adverse reactions reported in ≥2% of patients treated with GEMTESA 75 mg for up to 52 weeks in the long-term extension study, and not already listed above, were urinary tract infection (6.6%) and bronchitis (2.9%).

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of vibegron. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. The following adverse events have been reported in association with vibegron use in worldwide postmarketing experience:

Urologic disorders: urinary retention

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: pruritus, rash, drug eruption, eczema

Gastrointestinal disorders: constipation

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Concomitant use of GEMTESA increases digoxin maximal concentrations (Cmax ) and systemic exposure as assessed by area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Serum digoxin concentrations should be monitored before initiating and during therapy with GEMTESA and used for titration of the digoxin dose to obtain the desired clinical effect. Continue monitoring digoxin concentrations upon discontinuation of GEMTESA and adjust digoxin dose as needed.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no available data on GEMTESA use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes.

In animal studies, no effects on embryo-fetal development were observed following administration of vibegron during the period of organogenesis at exposures approximately 275-fold and 285-fold greater than clinical exposure at the recommended daily dose of GEMTESA, in rats and rabbits, respectively. Delayed fetal skeletal ossification was observed in rabbits at approximately 898-fold clinical exposure, in the presence of maternal toxicity. In rats treated with vibegron during pregnancy and lactation, no effects on offspring were observed at 89-fold clinical exposure. Developmental toxicity was observed in offspring at approximately 458-fold clinical exposure, in the presence of maternal toxicity. No effects on offspring were observed at 89-fold clinical exposure (see Data).

The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. All pregnancies carry some risk of birth defect, loss, or other adverse outcomes. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2-4% and 15-20%, respectively.

Data

Animal Data

In an embryo-fetal developmental toxicity study, pregnant rats were treated with daily oral doses of 0, 30, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day vibegron during the period of organogenesis (Days 6 to 20 of gestation). These doses were associated with systemic exposures (AUC) 0-, 9-, 89-, 275-, and 1867-fold higher, respectively, than in humans treated with the recommended daily dose of GEMTESA. No embryo-fetal developmental toxicity was observed at doses up to 300 mg/kg/day. Treatment with the high dose of 1000 mg/kg/day was discontinued due to maternal toxicity.

In an embryo-fetal developmental toxicity study, pregnant rabbits were treated with daily oral doses of 0, 30, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day vibegron during the period of organogenesis (Days 7 to 20 of gestation). These doses were associated with systemic exposures (AUC) 0-, 86-, 285-, and 898-fold higher, respectively, than in humans treated with the recommended daily dose of GEMTESA. No embryo-fetal developmental toxicity was observed at doses of vibegron up to 100 mg/kg/day. Maternal toxicity (decreased food consumption), reduced fetal body weight, and an increased incidence of delayed skeletal ossification, were observed at 300 mg/kg/day.

In a pre- and post-natal developmental toxicity study, pregnant or lactating rats were treated with daily oral doses of 0, 30, 100, or 500 mg/kg/day vibegron from day 6 of gestation through day 20 of lactation. These doses were associated with estimated systemic exposures (AUC) 0-, 9-, 89-, and 458-fold higher, respectively, than in humans treated with the recommended daily dose of GEMTESA. No developmental toxicity was observed in F1 offspring at doses up to 100 mg/kg/day. Maternal toxicity was observed during lactation (decreased body weight gain) at doses ≥100 mg/kg/day and during gestation (decreased body weight gain and food consumption) at 500 mg/kg/day. Developmental toxicity was observed in F1 offspring (increased stillborn index, lethality, reduced viability and weaning indices, decreased body weight and body weight gains, low physical development differentiation indices, and effects on sensory function and reflexes) at 500 mg/kg/day.

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