Genvoya (Page 5 of 11)

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that HIV-infected mothers not breastfeed their infants to avoid risking postnatal transmission of HIV.

Based on published data, emtricitabine has been shown to be present in human breast milk; it is unknown if elvitegravir, cobicistat, and TAF are present in human breast milk. Elvitegravir and cobicistat are present in rat milk, and tenofovir has been shown to be present in the milk of lactating rats and rhesus monkeys after administration of TDF [see Data]. It is unknown if TAF is present in animal milk.

It is not known if GENVOYA affects milk production or has effects on the breastfed child. Because of the potential for 1) HIV transmission (in HIV-negative infants); 2) developing viral resistance (in HIV-positive infants); and 3) adverse reactions in a breastfed infant similar to those seen in adults, instruct mothers not to breastfeed if they are receiving GENVOYA.

Data

Animal Data

Elvitegravir: During the pre/postnatal developmental toxicology study at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day, a mean elvitegravir milk to plasma ratio of 0.1 was measured 30 minutes after administration to rats on lactation day 14.

Cobicistat: During the pre/postnatal developmental toxicology study at doses up to 75 mg/kg/day, mean cobicistat milk to plasma ratio of up to 1.9 was measured 2 hours after administration to rats on lactation day 10.

Tenofovir Alafenamide: Studies in rats and monkeys have demonstrated that tenofovir is secreted in milk. During the pre/postnatal developmental toxicology study, tenofovir was excreted into the milk of lactating rats following oral administration of TDF (up to 600 mg/kg/day) at up to approximately 24% of the median plasma concentration in the highest dosed animals at lactation day 11. Tenofovir was excreted into the milk of lactating rhesus monkeys, following a single subcutaneous (30 mg/kg) dose of tenofovir, at concentrations up to approximately 4% of plasma concentration resulting in exposure (AUC) of approximately 20% of plasma exposure.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of GENVOYA for the treatment of HIV-1 infection was established in pediatric patients with body weight greater than or equal to 25 kg [see Indications and Usage (1) and Dosage and Administration (2.2)].

Use of GENVOYA in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age and weighing at least 25 kg is supported by studies in adults and by an open-label study in antiretroviral treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected pediatric subjects aged 12 to less than 18 years and weighing at least 35 kg (cohort 1 of Study 106, N=50) and in virologically-suppressed pediatric subjects aged 6 to less than 12 years and weighing at least 25 kg (cohort 2 of Study 106, N=52). The safety and efficacy of GENVOYA in adolescent subjects was similar to that in adults [see Adverse Reactions (6.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), and Clinical Studies (14.5)].

The safety and efficacy of GENVOYA in subjects 6 to 12 years of age weighing at least 25 kg was similar to that in antiretroviral treatment-naïve adults and adolescents with the exception of a decrease from baseline CD4+ cell count [see Adverse Reactions (6.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), and Clinical Studies (14.5)].

A pharmacokinetic evaluation of a reduced strength GENVOYA formulation containing 90 mg of EVG, 90 mg of COBI, 120 mg of FTC, and 6 mg TAF was performed in 27 virologically-suppressed pediatric patients at least 2 years of age and weighing at least 14 to less than 25 kg (cohort 3 of Study 106). Virologic, immunologic, and safety outcomes were similar to those observed in cohort 2 of Study 106. No clinically meaningful differences in drug exposures except EVG were identified between pediatric patients in cohort 3 receiving the reduced strength formulation and adults receiving the GENVOYA tablet containing 150 mg of EVG,150 mg of COBI, 200 mg of FTC, and 10 mg TAF. The median observed EVG Ctrough values in subjects in cohort 3 were significantly lower than the values correlated with efficacy in adults. Therefore, efficacy cannot be extrapolated from adults to pediatric patients weighing 14 to 25 kg.

Safety and effectiveness of GENVOYA in pediatric patients weighing less than 25 kg have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical trials of GENVOYA included 97 subjects (80 receiving GENVOYA) aged 65 years and over. No differences in safety or efficacy have been observed between elderly subjects and adults between 18 and less than 65 years of age.

8.6 Renal Impairment

The pharmacokinetics, safety, and virologic and immunologic responses of GENVOYA in HIV-1 infected adult subjects with renal impairment (estimated creatinine clearance between 30 and 69 mL per minute by Cockcroft-Gault method) were evaluated in 248 subjects in an open-label trial, Study 112.

The pharmacokinetics, safety, virologic and immunologic responses of GENVOYA in HIV-1 infected adult subjects with ESRD (estimated creatinine clearance of less than 15 mL per minute by Cockcroft-Gault method) receiving chronic hemodialysis were evaluated in 55 subjects in an open-label trial, Study 1825 [see Adverse Reactions (6.1) and Clinical Studies (14.4)].

No dosage adjustment of GENVOYA is recommended in patients with estimated creatinine clearance greater than or equal to 30 mL per minute, or in adult patients with ESRD (estimated creatinine clearance below 15 mL per minute) who are receiving chronic hemodialysis. On days of hemodialysis, administer GENVOYA after completion of hemodialysis treatment [see Dosage and Administration (2.2)].

GENVOYA is not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated creatinine clearance of 15 to below 30 mL per minute), or in patients with ESRD who are not receiving chronic hemodialysis, as the safety of GENVOYA has not been established in these populations [see Dosage and Administration (2.3), Warnings and Precautions (5.4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

No dosage adjustment of GENVOYA is required in patients with mild (Child-Pugh Class A) or moderate (Child-Pugh Class B) hepatic impairment. GENVOYA has not been studied in patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class C). Therefore, GENVOYA is not recommended for use in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Dosage and Administration (2.4) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

10 OVERDOSAGE

No data are available on overdose of GENVOYA in patients. If overdose occurs, monitor the patient for evidence of toxicity. Treatment of overdose with GENVOYA consists of general supportive measures including monitoring of vital signs as well as observation of the clinical status of the patient.

Elvitegravir: Limited clinical experience is available at doses higher than the recommended dose of elvitegravir in GENVOYA. In one study, elvitegravir (administered with the CYP3A inhibitor cobicistat) equivalent to 2 times the therapeutic dose of 150 mg once daily for 10 days was administered to 42 healthy subjects. No severe adverse reactions were reported. The effects of higher doses are not known. As elvitegravir is highly bound to plasma proteins, it is unlikely that it will be significantly removed by hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

Cobicistat: Limited clinical experience is available at doses higher than the recommended dose of cobicistat in GENVOYA. In two studies, a single dose of cobicistat 400 mg (2.7 times the dose in GENVOYA) was administered to a total of 60 healthy subjects. No severe adverse reactions were reported. The effects of higher doses are not known. As cobicistat is highly bound to plasma proteins, it is unlikely that it will be significantly removed by hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

Emtricitabine: Limited clinical experience is available at doses higher than the recommended dose of emtricitabine in GENVOYA. In one clinical pharmacology study, single doses of emtricitabine 1200 mg (6 times the dose in GENVOYA) were administered to 11 subjects. No severe adverse reactions were reported. The effects of higher doses are not known.

Hemodialysis treatment removes approximately 30% of the emtricitabine dose over a 3-hour dialysis period starting within 1.5 hours of emtricitabine dosing (blood flow rate of 400 mL per minute and a dialysate flow rate of 600 mL per minute). It is not known whether emtricitabine can be removed by peritoneal dialysis.

Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF): Limited clinical experience is available at doses higher than the recommended dose of TAF in GENVOYA. A single dose of 125 mg TAF (12.5 times the dose in GENVOYA) was administered to 48 healthy subjects; no serious adverse reactions were reported. The effects of higher doses are unknown. Tenofovir is efficiently removed by hemodialysis with an extraction coefficient of approximately 54%.

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