Glimepiride (Page 4 of 6)

8. 5 Geriatric Use

In clinical trials of glimepiride, 1053 of 3491 patients (30%) were >65 years of age. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

There were no significant differences in glimepiride pharmacokinetics between patients with type 2 diabetes ≤65 years (n=49) and those >65 years (n=42) [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)].

Glimepiride is substantially excreted by the kidney. Elderly patients are more likely to have renal impairment. In addition, hypoglycemia may be difficult to recognize in the elderly [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.1) and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1)]. Use caution when initiating glimepiride and increasing the dose of glimepiride in this patient population.

8.6 Renal Impairment

To minimize the risk of hypoglycemia, the recommended starting dose of glimepiride is 1 mg daily for all patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.1) and Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1)].

A multiple-dose titration study was conducted in 16 patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment using doses ranging from 1 mg to 8 mg daily for 3 months. Baseline creatinine clearance ranged from 10 to 60 mL/min. The pharmacokinetics of glimepiride was evaluated in the multiple-dose titration study and the results were consistent with those observed in patients enrolled in a single-dose study. In both studies, the relative total clearance of glimepiride increased when kidney function was impaired. Both studies also demonstrated that the elimination of the two major metabolites was reduced in patients with renal impairment [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)].

10 OVERDOSAG E

An overdosage of glimepiride, as with other sulfonylureas, can produce severe hypoglycemia. Mild episodes of hypoglycemia can be treated with oral glucose. Severe hypoglycemic reactions constitute medical emergencies requiring immediate treatment. Severe hypoglycemia with coma, seizure, or neurological impairment can be treated with glucagon or intravenous glucose. Continued observation and additional carbohydrate intake may be necessary because hypoglycemia may recur after apparent clinical recovery [see Warnings and Precautions ( 5.1) ]

1 1 DESCRIPTION

Glimepiride is an oral sulfonylurea that contains the active ingredient glimepiride. Chemically, glimepiride is identified as 1-[[p-[2-(3-ethyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-3-pyrroline-1­carboxamido) ethyl]phenyl]sulfonyl]-3-(trans-4-methylcyclohexyl)urea (C 24 H 34 N 4 O 5 S) with a molecular weight of 490.62. Glimepiride is a white to yellowish-white, crystalline, odorless to practically odorless powder and is practically insoluble in water.

The structural formula is:

Structure
(click image for full-size original)

Glimepiride tablets, USP contain the active ingredient glimepiride and the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate, sodium starch glycolate, povidone, and magnesium stearate. In addition, glimepiride tablets, USP 1 mg contain ferric oxide red, glimepiride tablets, USP 2 mg contain ferric oxide yellow and FD &C blue #2 aluminum lake, and glimepiride tablets, USP 4 mg contain FD&C blue #2 aluminum lake.

1 2 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

Glimepiride primarily lowers blood glucose by stimulating the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. Sulfonylureas bind to the sulfonylurea receptor in the pancreatic beta- cell plasma membrane, leading to closure of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel, thereby stimulating the release of insulin.

12.2 Pharmacodynamics

In healthy subjects, the time to reach maximal effect (minimum blood glucose concentrations) was approximately 2 to 3 hours after single oral doses of glimepiride. The effects of glimepiride on HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial glucose have been assessed in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies ( 14)].

1 2 .3 Pharmacokinetics

Absorption : Studies with single oral doses of glimepiride in healthy subjects and with multiple oral doses in patients with type 2 diabetes showed peak drug concentrations (C max ) 2 to 3 hours postdose. When glimepiride was given with meals, the mean C max and AUC (area under the curve) were decreased by 8% and 9%, respectively.

Glimepiride does not accumulate in serum following multiple dosing. The pharmacokinetics of glimepiride does not differ between healthy subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes. Clearance of glimepiride after oral administration does not change over the 1 mg to 8 mg dose range, indicating linear pharmacokinetics.

In healthy subjects, the intraindividual and interindividual variabilities of glimepiride pharmacokinetic parameters were 15% to 23% and 24% to 29%, respectively.

Distribution: After intravenous dosing in healthy subjects, the volume of distribution (Vd) was 8.8 L (113 mL/kg), and the total body clearance (CL) was 47.8 mL/min. Protein binding was greater than 99.5%.

Metabolism: Glimepiride is completely metabolized by oxidative biotransformation after either an intravenous or oral dose. The major metabolites are the cyclohexyl hydroxy methyl derivative (M1) and the carboxyl derivative (M2). Cytochrome P450 2C9 is involved in the biotransformation of glimepiride to M1. M1 is further metabolized to M2 by one or several cytosolic enzymes. M2 is inactive. In animals, M1 possesses about one- third of the pharmacological activity of glimepiride, but it is unclear whether M1 results in clinically meaningful effects on blood glucose in humans.

Excretion: When 14C-glimepiride was given orally to 3 healthy male subjects, approximately 60% of the total radioactivity was recovered in the urine in 7 days. M1 and M2 accounted for 80% to 90% of the radioactivity recovered in the urine. The ratio of M1 to M2 in the urine was approximately 3:2 in two subjects and 4:1 in one subject. Approximately 40% of the total radioactivity was recovered in feces. M1 and M2 accounted for about 70% (ratio of M1 to M2 was 1:3) of the radioactivity recovered in feces. No parent drug was recovered from urine or feces. After intravenous dosing in patients, no significant biliary excretion of glimepiride or its M1 metabolite was observed.

Specific Populations

Geriatric patients:

A comparison of glimepiride pharmacokinetics in patients with type 2 diabetes ≤65 years and those >65 years was evaluated in a multiple-dose study using glimepiride 6 mg daily. There were no significant differences in glimepiride pharmacokinetics between the two age groups. The mean AUC at steady state for the older patients was approximately 13% lower than that for the younger patients; the mean weight- adjusted clearance for the older patients was approximately 11% higher than that for the younger patients.

Gender: There were no differences between males and females in the pharmacokinetics of glimepiride when adjustment was made for differences in body weight.

Race: No studies have been conducted to assess the effects of race on glimepiride pharmacokinetics but in placebo-controlled trials of glimepiride in patients with type 2 diabetes, the reduction in HbA1C was comparable in Caucasians (n = 536), blacks (n = 63), and Hispanics (n = 63).

Renal impairment: In a single-dose, open-label study glimepiride 3 mg was administered to patients with mild, moderate and severe renal impairment as estimated by creatinine clearance (CLcr): Group I consisted of 5 patients with mild renal impairment (CLcr > 50 mL/min), Group II consisted of 3 patients with moderate renal impairment (CLcr = 20 to 50 mL/min) and Group III consisted of 7 patients with severe renal impairment (CLcr < 20 mL/min). Although glimepiride serum concentrations decreased with decreasing renal function, Group III had a 2.3-fold higher mean AUC for M1 and an 8.6-fold higher mean AUC for M2 compared to corresponding mean AUCs in Group I. The apparent terminal half-life (T 1/2 ) for glimepiride did not change, while the half-lives for M1 and M2 increased as renal function decreased. Mean urinary excretion of M1 plus M2 as a percentage of dose decreased from 44.4% for Group I to 21.9% for Group II and 9.3% for Group III.

Hepatic impairment: It is unknown whether there is an effect of hepatic impairment on glimepiride pharmacokinetics because the pharmacokinetics of glimepiride has not been adequately evaluated in patients with hepatic impairment.

Obese patients: The pharmacokinetics of glimepiride and its metabolites were measured in a single-dose study involving 28 patients with type 2 diabetes who either had normal body weight or were morbidly obese. While the t max ,clearance and volume of distribution of glimepiride in the morbidly obese patients were similar to those in the normal weight group, the morbidly obese had lower C max and AUC than those of normal body weight. The mean C max , AUC 0-24 , AUC 0-∞ values of glimepiride in normal vs. morbidly obese patients were 547 ± 218 ng/mL vs. 410 ± 124 ng/mL, 3210 ± 1030 hours•ng/mL vs. 2820 ± 1110 hours•ng/mL and 4000 ± 1320 hours•ng/mL vs. 3280 ± 1360 hours•ng/mL, respectively.

Drug Interactions:

Aspirin: In a randomized, double-blind, two-period, crossover study, healthy subjects were given either placebo or aspirin 1 gram three times daily for a total treatment period of 5 days. On Day 4 of each study period, a single 1 mg dose of glimepiride was administered. The glimepiride doses were separated by a 14-day washout period. Coadministration of aspirin and glimepiride resulted in a 34% decrease in the mean glimepiride AUC and a 4% decrease in the mean glimepiride C max .

Colesevelam: Concomitant administration of colesevelam and glimepiride resulted in reductions in glimepiride AUC 0-∞ and C max of 18% and 8%, respectively. When glimepiride was administered 4 hours prior to colesevelam, there was no significant change in glimepiride AUC 0-∞ or C max , -6% and 3%, respectively [see Dosage and Administration (2.1)and Drug Interactions (7.4)].

Cimetidine and ranitidine: In a randomized, open-label, 3-way crossover study, healthy subjects received either a single 4 mg dose of glimepiride alone, glimepiride with ranitidine (150 mg twice daily for 4 days; glimepiride was administered on Day 3), or glimepiride with cimetidine (800 mg daily for 4 days; glimepiride was administered on Day 3). Co-administration of cimetidine or ranitidine with a single 4 mg oral dose of glimepiride did not significantly alter the absorption and disposition of glimepiride.

Propranolol: In a randomized, double-blind, two-period, crossover study, healthy subjects were given either placebo or propranolol 40 mg three times daily for a total treatment period of 5 days. On Day 4 of each study period, a single 2 mg dose of glimepiride was administered. The glimepiride doses were separated by a 14-day washout period. Concomitant administration of propranolol and glimepiride significantly increased glimepiride C max , AUC, and T 1/2 by 23%, 22%, and 15%, respectively, and decreased glimepiride CL/f by 18%. The recovery of M1 and M2 from urine was not changed.

Warfarin: In an open-label, two-way, crossover study, healthy subjects received 4 mg of glimepiride daily for 10 days. Single 25 mg doses of warfarin were administered 6 days before starting glimepiride and on Day 4 of glimepiride administration. The concomitant administration of glimepiride did not alter the pharmacokinetics of R- and S-warfarin enantiomers. No changes were observed in warfarin plasma protein binding. Glimepiride resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the pharmacodynamic response to warfarin. The reductions in mean area under the prothrombin time (PT) curve and maximum PT values during glimepiride treatment were 3.3% and 9.9%, respectively, and are unlikely to be clinically relevant.

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