Hailey 24 Fe (Page 4 of 6)

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Consult the labeling of concurrently used drugs to obtain further information about interactions with oral contraceptives or the potential for enzyme alterations.

Effects of Other Drugs on Combined Oral Contraceptives

Substances decreasing the plasma concentrations of COCs and potentially diminishing the efficacy of COCs:

Drugs or herbal products that induce certain enzymes, including cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), may decrease the plasma concentrations of COCs and potentially diminish the effectiveness of COCs or increase breakthrough bleeding. Some drugs or herbal products that may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives including phenytoin, barbiturates, carbamazepine, bosentan, felbamate, griseofulvin, oxcarbazepine, rifampicin, topiramate, rifabutin, rufinamide, aprepitant, and products containing St. John’s wort. Interactions between COCs and other drugs may lead to breakthrough bleeding and/or contraceptive failure. Counsel women to use an alternative method of contraception or a back-up method when enzyme inducers are used with COCs, and to continue back-up contraception for 28 days after discontinuing the enzyme inducer to ensure contraceptive reliability.

Substances increasing the plasma concentrations of COCs:

Co-administration of atorvastatin or rosuvastatin and certain COCs containing ethinyl estradiol (EE) increase AUC values for EE by approximately 20 to 25%. Ascorbic acid and acetaminophen may increase plasma EE concentrations, possibly by inhibition of conjugation. CYP3A4 inhibitors such as itraconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole, grapefruit juice, or ketoconazole may increase plasma hormone concentrations.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors:

Significant changes (increase or decrease) in the plasma concentrations of estrogen and/or progestin have been noted in some cases of co-administration with HIV protease inhibitors (decrease [e.g., nelfinavir, ritonavir, darunavir/ritonavir, (fos)amprenavir/ritonavir, lopinavir/ritnoavir, and tipranavir/ritonavir] or increase [e.g., indinavir and atazanavir/ritonavir])/HCV protease inhibitors or with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (decrease [e.g., nevirapine] or increase [e.g., etravirine]).

Effects of Combined Oral Contraceptives on Other Drugs

COCs containing EE may inhibit the metabolism of other compounds (e.g., cyclosporine, prednisolone, theophylline, tizanidine, and voriconazole) and increase their plasma concentrations. COCs have been shown to decrease plasma concentrations of acetaminophen, clofibric acid, morphine, salicylic acid, and temazepam. Significant decrease in plasma concentration of lamotrigine has been shown, likely due to induction of lamotrigine glucuronidation. This may reduce seizure control; therefore, dosage adjustments of lamotrigine may be necessary.

Women on thyroid hormone replacement therapy may need increased doses of thyroid hormone because the serum concentration of thyroid-binding globulin increases with use of COCs [see Warnings and Precautions (5.12)].

Concomitant Use with HCV Combination Therapy – Liver Enzyme Elevation

Do not co-administer Hailey 24 Fe with HCV drug combinations containing ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir, with or without dasabuvir, due to potential for ALT elevations [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].

Interactions with Laboratory Tests

The use of contraceptive steroids may influence the results of certain laboratory tests, such as coagulation factors, lipids, glucose tolerance, and binding proteins.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Click here to enter Use in Specific Populations

8.1 Pregnancy

There is little or no increased risk of birth defects in women who inadvertently use COCs during early pregnancy. Epidemiologic studies and meta-analyses have not found an increased risk of genital or non-genital birth defects (including cardiac anomalies and limb reduction defects) following exposure to low dose COCs prior to conception or during early pregnancy.

Do not administer COCs to induce withdrawal bleeding as a test for pregnancy. Do not use COCs during pregnancy to treat threatened or habitual abortion.

Women who do not breastfeed should not start COCs earlier than 4 weeks postpartum.

8.3 Nursing Mothers

Advise the nursing mother to use another contraceptive method, when possible, until she has weaned her child. COCs can reduce milk production in breastfeeding mothers. This is less likely to occur once breastfeeding is well-established; however, it can occur at any time in some women. Small amounts of oral contraceptive steroids and/or metabolites are present in breast milk.

8.4 Pediatric Use

Safety and efficacy of norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets and ferrous fumarate tablets have been established in women of reproductive age. Efficacy is expected to be the same in postpubertal adolescents under the age of 18 years as for users 18 years and older. Use of this product before menarche is not indicated.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets and ferrous fumarate tablets have not been studied in postmenopausal women and is not indicated in this population.

Hepatic Impairment

The pharmacokinetics of norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets and ferrous fumarate tablets have not been studied in subjects with hepatic impairment. However, steroid hormones may be poorly metabolized in patients with hepatic impairment. Acute or chronic disturbances of liver function may necessitate the discontinuation of COC use until markers of liver function return to normal and COC causation has been excluded [see Contraindications (4) and Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

Renal Impairment

The pharmacokinetics of norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets and ferrous fumarate tablets have not been studied in women with renal impairment.

Body Mass Index

The safety and efficacy of norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets and ferrous fumarate tablets in women with a body mass index (BMI) > 35 kg/m2 has not been evaluated [see Clinical Studies (14)].

10 OVERDOSAGE

There have been no reports of serious ill effects from overdose of oral contraceptives, including ingestion by children. Overdosage may cause withdrawal bleeding in females and nausea.

11 DESCRIPTION

Hailey™ 24 Fe (norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol tablets USP and ferrous fumarate tablets) is a combination oral contraceptive for oral administration consisting of active tablets containing norethindrone acetate, USP, a progestin, and ethinyl estradiol, USP, an estrogen, and placebo tablets containing ferrous fumarate, which serve no therapeutic purpose.

Each active white tablet contains 1 mg norethindrone acetate, USP and 20 mcg ethinyl estradiol, USP. Inactive ingredients include acacia, corn starch, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, sucrose and talc.
Each placebo brown tablet contains 75 mg ferrous fumarate, microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, povidone, sodium starch glycolate, corn starch and talc. The ferrous fumarate tablets do not serve any therapeutic purpose.

The chemical name of ethinyl estradiol, USP is [19-Norpregna-1,3,5(10)-trien-20-yne-3,17-diol, (17α)-]. The empirical formula of ethinyl estradiol, USP is C20H24O2 and the structural formula is:

Structure 1.jpg
(click image for full-size original)

The chemical name of norethindrone acetate, USP is [19-Norpregn-4-en-20-yn-3-one, 17-(acetyloxy)-, (17α)-]. The empirical formula of norethindrone acetate, USP is C22H28O3 and the structural formula is:

structure 2.jpg
(click image for full-size original)

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