Haloperidol (Page 4 of 5)

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug, and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The data described below reflect exposure to haloperidol in the following:

  • 284 patients who participated in 3 double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with haloperidol (oral formulation, 2 to 20 mg/day); two trials were in the treatment of schizophrenia and one in the treatment of bipolar disorder.
  • 1295 patients who participated in 16 double-blind, active comparator-controlled clinical trials with haloperidol (injection or oral formulation, 1 to 45 mg/day) in the treatment of schizophrenia.

Based on the pooled safety data, the most common adverse reactions in haloperidol-treated patients from these double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials (≥5%) were: extrapyramidal disorder, hyperkinesia, tremor, hypertonia, dystonia, and somnolence.

Adverse Reactions Reported at ≥1% Incidence in Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials with Oral Haloperidol

Adverse reactions occurring in ≥1% of haloperidol-treated patients and at higher rate than placebo in 3 double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, clinical trials with the oral formulation are shown in Table 1.

Table 1. Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥1% of Haloperidol-Treated Patients in Double-Blind, Parallel Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials (Oral Haloperidol)

a Represents the total reporting rate for extrapyramidal disorder (reported term) and individual symptoms of extrapyramidal disorder, including events that did not meet the threshold of ≥1% for inclusion in this table

System/Organ Class Adverse Reaction Haloperidol(n=284)% Placebo(n=282)%
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Constipation 4.2 1.8
Dry mouth 1.8 0.4
Salivary hypersecretion 1.2 0.7
Nervous System Disorders
Extrapyramidal disordera 50.7 16.0
Hyperkinesia 10.2 2.5
Tremor 8.1 3.6
Hypertonia 7.4 0.7
Dystonia 6.7 0.4
Bradykinesia 4.2 0.4
Somnolence 5.3 1.1

Additional Adverse Reactions Reported in Double-Blind, Placebo- or Active Comparator-Controlled Clinical Trials with Injectable or Oral Haloperidol

Additional adverse reactions that are listed below were reported by haloperidol-treated patients in double-blind, active comparator-controlled clinical trials with the injectable or oral formulation, or at <1% incidence in double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, clinical trials with the oral formulation.

Cardiac Disorders: Tachycardia

Endocrine Disorders: Hyperprolactinemia

Eye Disorders: Vision blurred

Investigations: Weight increased

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: Torticollis, Trismus, Muscle rigidity, Muscle twitching

Nervous System Disorders: Akathisia, Dizziness, Dyskinesia, Hypokinesia, Neuroleptic malignant syndrome, Nystagmus, Oculogyric crisis, Parkinsonism, Sedation, Tardive dyskinesia

Psychiatric Disorders: Loss of libido, Restlessness

Reproductive System and Breast Disorders: Amenorrhea, Galactorrhea, Dysmenorrhea, Erectile dysfunction, Menorrhagia, Breast discomfort

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: Acneiform skin reactions

Vascular Disorders: Hypotension, Orthostatic hypotension

Adverse Reactions Identified in Clinical Trials with Haloperidol Decanoate

The adverse reactions listed below were identified in clinical trials with haloperidol decanoate (long-acting depot formulation), and reflect exposure to the active moiety haloperidol in 410 patients who participated in 13 clinical trials with haloperidol decanoate (15 to 500 mg/month) in the treatment of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. These clinical trials comprised:

  • 1 double-blind, active comparator-controlled trial with fluphenazine decanoate.
  • 2 trials comparing the decanoate formulation to oral haloperidol.
  • 9 open-label trials.
  • 1 dose-response trial.

Nervous System Disorders: Akinesia, Cogwheel rigidity, Masked facies.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions relating to the active moiety haloperidol have been identified during postapproval use of haloperidol or haloperidol decanoate. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: Pancytopenia, Agranulocytosis, Thrombocytopenia, Leukopenia, Neutropenia

Cardiac Disorders: Ventricular fibrillation, Torsade de pointes, Ventricular tachycardia, Extrasystoles

Endocrine Disorders: Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

Gastrointestinal Disorders: Vomiting, Nausea

General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: Sudden death, Face edema, Edema, Hyperthermia, Hypothermia

Hepatobiliary Disorders: Acute hepatic failure, Hepatitis, Cholestasis, Jaundice, Liver function test abnormal

Immune System Disorders: Anaphylactic reaction, Hypersensitivity

Investigations: Electrocardiogram QT prolonged, Weight decreased

Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders: Hypoglycemia

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: Rhabdomyolysis

Nervous System Disorders: Convulsion, Headache, Opisthotonus, Tardive dystonia

Pregnancy, Puerperium and Perinatal Conditions: Drug withdrawal syndrome neonatal

Psychiatric Disorders: Agitation, Confusional state, Depression, Insomnia

Renal and Urinary Disorders: Urinary retention

Reproductive System and Breast Disorders: Priapism, Gynecomastia

Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: Laryngeal edema, Bronchospasm, Laryngospasm, Dyspnea

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: Angioedema, Dermatitis exfoliative, Hypersensitivity vasculitis, Photosensitivity reaction, Urticaria, Pruritus, Rash, Hyperhidrosis

OVERDOSAGE

Manifestations

In general, the symptoms of overdosage would be an exaggeration of known pharmacologic effects and adverse reactions, the most prominent of which would be: 1) severe extrapyramidal reactions, 2) hypotension, or 3) sedation. The patient would appear comatose with respiratory depression and hypotension which could be severe enough to produce a shock-like state. The extrapyramidal reactions would be manifested by muscular weakness or rigidity and a generalized or localized tremor as demonstrated by the akinetic or agitans types respectively. With accidental overdosage, hypertension rather than hypotension occurred in a two-year old child. The risk of ECG changes associated with torsade de pointes should be considered. (For further information regarding torsade de pointes, please refer to ADVERSE REACTIONS.)

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