Isturisa (Page 3 of 6)

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Effect of Other Drugs on ISTURISA

The effect of other drugs on ISTURISA can be found in Table 2.

Table 2: Effect of Other Drugs on ISTURISA

CYP3A4 Inhibitors

Clinical Impact:

Concomitant use of ISTURISA with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor (e.g., itraconazole, clarithromycin) may cause an increase in osilodrostat concentration and may increase the risk of ISTURISA-related adverse reactions [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)] .

Intervention:

Reduce the dose of ISTURISA by half with concomitant use of a strong CYP3A4

inhibitor.

CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 Inducers

Clinical Impact:

Concomitant use of ISTURISA with strong CYP3A4 and/or CYP2B6 inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, rifampin, phenobarbital) may cause a decrease in osilodrostat concentration and may reduce the efficacy of ISTURISA [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)] .

Discontinuation of strong CYP3A4 and/or CYP2B6 inducers while using ISTURISA may cause an increase in osilodrostat concentration and may increase the risk of ISTURISA-related adverse reactions [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)] .

Intervention:

During concomitant use of ISTURISA with strong CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 inducers, monitor cortisol concentration and patient’s signs and symptoms. An increase in ISTURISA dosage may be needed.

Upon discontinuation of strong CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 inducers during ISTURISA treatment, monitor cortisol concentration and patient’s signs and symptoms. A reduction in ISTURISA dosage may be needed.

7.2 Effect of ISTURISA on Other Drugs

ISTURISA should be used with caution when coadministered with CYP1A2 and CYP2C19 substrates with a narrow therapeutic index, such as theophylline, tizanidine, and S-mephenytoin [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)] .

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no available data on osilodrostat use in pregnant women to evaluate for a drug-associated risk of major birth defects, miscarriage, or adverse maternal or fetal outcomes. There are risks to the mother and fetus associated with active Cushing’s Syndrome during pregnancy (see Clinical Considerations).

No adverse developmental outcomes were observed in reproduction studies in pregnant rats and rabbits when exposed to osilodrostat during organogenesis at doses that produced maternal exposures of 7 and 0.5-times the 30 mg twice daily maximum clinical dose, by AUC. In rabbits, exposures associated with maternal toxicity at 7-times the maximum clinical dose resulted in decreased fetal viability. No adverse developmental outcomes were observed in a pre- and postnatal development study with administration of osilodrostat to pregnant rats from organogenesis through lactation at 8-times the 30 mg twice daily maximum clinical dose (see Data).

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. In the U.S. general population, the estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2%-4% and 15%-20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Disease-Associated Maternal and/or Embryo/Fetal Risk

Active Cushing Syndrome during pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality (including gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, maternal death, miscarriage, fetal loss, and preterm birth).

Data

Animal Data

Osilodrostat administered to pregnant Wistar Han rats from gestation day 6-17 at doses of 0.5, 5, 50 mg/kg did not adversely affect embryo-fetal development up to 5 mg/kg (8-times the 30 mg twice daily maximum clinical dose, by AUC). Maternal toxicity, increased embryonic and fetal deaths, decreased fetal weights, and malformations occurred at 50 mg/kg (118-times the maximum clinical dose, by AUC).

Osilodrostat administered to pregnant New Zealand rabbits from gestation day 7-20 at doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg did not adversely affect embryo-fetal development at 3 mg/kg (0.5-times the 30 mg twice daily maximum clinical dose, by AUC). Maternal toxicity, increased embryo resorption and decreased fetal viability was observed at ≥ 10mg/kg (7-times the maximum clinical dose, by AUC).

Osilodrostat administered to Wistar Han rats from gestation day 6 through lactation day 20 at doses of 1, 5, and 20 mg/kg did not adversely impact behavioral, developmental, or reproductive parameters up to 5 mg/kg (~ 8 times the 30 mg twice daily maximum clinical dose, by AUC). Delayed parturition and dystocia in maternal rats and decreased pup survival were observed at 20 mg/kg (43-times the maximum clinical dose, by AUC).

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no available data on the presence of osilodrostat in human or animal milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions (such as adrenal insufficiency) in the breastfed infant, advise patients that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment with ISTURISA and for one week after the final dose.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of ISTURISA in pediatric patients have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Of the 167 patients in clinical trials with ISTURISA, 10 (6%) were 65 years and older. There were no patients above 75 years of age. Based on the available data on the use of ISTURISA in patients older than 65 years, no dosage adjustment is required [see Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)] .

8.6 Renal Impairment

No dosage adjustment of ISTURISA in patients with impaired renal function is required [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.4), Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)] . In patients with moderate to severe renal impairment, UFC levels should be interpreted with caution due to reduced UFC excretion.

8.7 Hepatic Impairment

Dosage adjustment is not required in patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh A) but is required for patients with moderately impaired hepatic function (Child-Pugh B) and for patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh C) [see Dosage and Administration ( 2.3) , Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3)] . More frequent monitoring of adrenal function may be required during dose titration in all patients with hepatic impairment.

10 OVERDOSAGE

Overdosage may result in severe hypocortisolism. Signs and symptoms suggestive of hypocortisolism may include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, low blood pressure, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, dizziness, and syncope.

In case of suspected overdosage, ISTURISA should be temporarily discontinued, cortisol levels should be checked, and if necessary, corticosteroid supplementation should be initiated. Close surveillance may be necessary, including monitoring of the QT interval, blood pressure, glucose, fluid, and electrolyte until the patient’s condition is stable.

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