Letrozole (Page 3 of 9)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of letrozole. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Eye Disorders: blurred vision

Hepatobiliary Disorders: increased hepatic enzymes, hepatitis

Immune System Disorders: anaphylactic reactions, hypersensitivity reactions

Nervous System Disorders: carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger

Pregnancy: spontaneous abortions, congenital birth defects

Skin and subcutaneous disorders: angioedema, toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythema multiforme

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

Tamoxifen

Coadministration of letrozole and tamoxifen 20 mg daily resulted in a reduction of letrozole plasma levels of 38% on average (study P015). Clinical experience in the second-line breast cancer trials (AR/BC2 and AR/BC3) indicates that the therapeutic effect of letrozole therapy is not impaired if letrozole is administered immediately after tamoxifen.

Cimetidine

A pharmacokinetic interaction study with cimetidine (study P004) showed no clinically significant effect on letrozole pharmacokinetics.

Warfarin

An interaction study (P017) with warfarin showed no clinically significant effect of letrozole on warfarin pharmacokinetics.

Other anticancer agents

There is no clinical experience to date on the use of letrozole in combination with other anticancer agents.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

Based on postmarketing reports, findings from animal studies and the mechanism of action, letrozole can cause fetal harm and is contraindicated for use in pregnant women. In post-marketing reports, use of letrozole during pregnancy resulted in cases of spontaneous abortions and congenital birth defects; however, the data are insufficient to inform a drug-associated risk [see Contraindications ( 4), Warnings and Precautions ( 5.6), Adverse Reactions ( 6.2) and Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.1)].

In animal reproduction studies, administration of letrozole to pregnant animals during organogenesis resulted in increased post-implantation pregnancy loss and resorption, fewer live fetuses, and fetal malformation affecting the renal and skeletal systems in rats and rabbits at doses approximately 0.1 times the daily maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) on a mg/m 2 basis (see Data).

The background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population is unknown. However, the background risk in the U.S. general population of major birth defects is 2% to 4% and of miscarriage is 15% to 20% of clinically recognized pregnancies.

Data

Animal Data

In a fertility and early embryonic development toxicity study in female rats, oral administration of letrozole starting 2 weeks before mating until pregnancy day 6 resulted in an increase in pre-implantation loss at doses ≥ 0.003 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.01 times the maximum recommended human dose on a mg/m 2 basis).

In an embryo-fetal developmental toxicity study in rats, daily administration of oral letrozole during the period of organogenesis at doses ≥ 0.003 mg/kg (approximately 0.01 time the maximum recommended human dose on a mg/m 2 basis) resulted in embryo-fetal toxicity including intrauterine mortality, increased resorptions and postimplantation loss, decreased numbers of live fetuses and fetal anomalies including absence and shortening of renal papilla, dilation of ureter, edema and incomplete ossification of frontal skull and metatarsals. Letrozole was teratogenic to rats at a dose of 0.03 mg/kg (approximately 0.01 times the maximum recommended human dose on a mg/m 2 basis) and caused fetal domed head and cervical/centrum vertebral fusion.

In the embryo-fetal development toxicity study in rabbits, daily administration of oral letrozole during the period of organogenesis at doses ≥ 0.002 mg/kg (approximately 0.01 times the maximum recommended human dose on a mg/m 2 basis) resulted in embryo-fetal toxicity including intrauterine mortality, increased resorption, increased postimplantation loss and decreased numbers of live fetuses. Fetal anomalies included incomplete ossification of the skull, sternebrae, and fore- and hind legs.

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

It is not known if letrozole is present in human milk. There are no data on the effects of letrozole on the breastfed infant or milk production. Exposure of lactating rats to letrozole was associated with impaired reproductive performance of the male offspring (see Data). Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in breastfed infants from letrozole tablets, advise lactating women not to breastfeed while taking letrozole tablets and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose.

Data

Animal Data

In a postnatal developmental toxicity study in lactating rats, letrozole was administered orally at doses of 1, 0.003, 0.03 or 0.3 mg/kg/day on day 0 through day 20 of lactation. The reproductive performance of the male offspring was impaired at letrozole dose as low as 0.003 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.01 times the maximum recommended human dose on a mg/m 2 basis), as reflected by decreased mating and pregnancy ratios. There were no effects on the reproductive performance of female offspring.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Pregnancy Testing

Based on animal studies, letrozole can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1)]. Females of reproductive potential should have a pregnancy test prior to starting treatment with letrozole.

Contraception

Females

Based on animal studies, letrozole tablets can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman [see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.1)]. . Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with letrozole tablets and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose.

Infertility

Females

Based on studies in female animals, letrozole tablets may impair fertility in females of reproductive potential [see Nonclinical Toxicology ( 13.1)].

Males

Based on studies in male animals, letrozole tablets may impair fertility in males of reproductive potential [see Nonclinical Toxicology ( 13.1)].

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Letrozole administration to young (postnatal day 7) rats for 12 weeks duration at 0.003, 0.03, 0.3 mg/kg/day by oral gavage resulted in adverse skeletal/growth effects (bone maturation, bone mineral density) and neuroendocrine and reproductive developmental perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Administration of 0.3 mg/kg/day resulted in AUC values that were similar to the AUC in adult patients receiving the recommended dose of 2.5 mg/day. Decreased fertility was accompanied by hypertrophy of the hypophysis and testicular changes that included degeneration of the seminiferous tubular epithelium and atrophy of the female reproductive tract. Young rats in this study were allowed to recover following discontinuation of letrozole treatment for 42 days. Histopathological changes were not reversible at clinically relevant exposures.

8.5 Geriatric Use

The median age of patients in all studies of first-line and second-line treatment of metastatic breast cancer was 64 to 65 years. About 1/3 of the patients were greater than or equal to 70 years old. In the first-line study, patients greater than or equal to 70 years of age experienced longer time to tumor progression and higher response rates than patients less than 70.

For the extended adjuvant setting (MA-17), more than 5,100 postmenopausal women were enrolled in the clinical study. In total, 41% of patients were aged 65 years or older at enrollment, while 12% were 75 or older. In the extended adjuvant setting, no overall differences in safety or efficacy were observed between these older patients and younger patients, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

In the adjuvant setting (BIG 1-98), more than 8,000 postmenopausal women were enrolled in the clinical study. In total, 36 % of patients were aged 65 years or older at enrollment, while 12% were 75 or older. More adverse reactions were generally reported in elderly patients irrespective of study treatment allocation. However, in comparison to tamoxifen, no overall differences with regards to the safety and efficacy profiles were observed between elderly patients and younger patients.

All MedLibrary.org resources are included in as near-original form as possible, meaning that the information from the original provider has been rendered here with only typographical or stylistic modifications and not with any substantive alterations of content, meaning or intent.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only, in accordance with our Terms of Use, and is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a medical doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner or other qualified health professional.

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2021. All Rights Reserved.