Lopressor (Page 4 of 5)

Potential Adverse Reactions

A variety of adverse reactions not listed above have been reported with other beta-adrenergic blocking agents and should be considered potential adverse reactions to Lopressor.

Central Nervous System: Reversible mental depression progressing to catatonia; an acute reversible syndrome characterized by disorientation for time and place, short-term memory loss, emotional lability, slightly clouded sensorium, and decreased performance on neuropsychometrics.

Cardiovascular: Intensification of AV block (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Hematologic: Agranulocytosis, nonthrombocytopenic purpura and thrombocytopenic purpura.

Hypersensitive Reactions: Fever combined with aching and sore throat, laryngospasm and respiratory distress.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been reported during post-approval use of Lopressor: confusional state, an increase in blood triglycerides and a decrease in High Density Lipoprotein (HDL). Because these reports are from a population of uncertain size and are subject to confounding factors, it is not possible to reliably estimate their frequency.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Validus Pharmaceuticals LLC at 1-866-982-5438 (1-866-9VALIDUS) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

OVERDOSAGE

Acute Toxicity

Several cases of overdosage have been reported, some leading to death.

Oral LD 50 ’s (mg/kg): mice, 1158-2460; rats, 3090-4670.

Signs and Symptoms

Potential signs and symptoms associated with overdosage with Lopressor are bradycardia, hypotension, bronchospasm, myocardial infarction, cardiac failure and death.

Management

There is no specific antidote.

In general, patients with acute or recent myocardial infarction may be more hemodynamically unstable than other patients and should be treated accordingly (see WARNINGS, Myocardial Infarction).

On the basis of the pharmacologic actions of Lopressor, the following general measures should be employed:

Elimination of the Drug: Gastric lavage should be performed.

Other clinical manifestations of overdose should be managed symptomatically based on modern methods of intensive care.

Hypotension: Administer a vasopressor, e.g., levarterenol or dopamine.

Bronchospasm: Administer a beta2 -stimulating agent and/or a theophylline derivative.

Cardiac Failure: Administer digitalis glycoside and diuretic. In shock resulting from inadequate cardiac contractility, consider administration of dobutamine, isoproterenol or glucagon.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Hypertension

Individualize the dosage of Lopressor tablets. Lopressor tablets should be taken with or immediately following meals.

The usual initial dosage of Lopressor tablets is 100 mg daily in single or divided doses, whether used alone or added to a diuretic. Increase the dosage at weekly (or longer) intervals until optimum blood pressure reduction is achieved. In general, the maximum effect of any given dosage level will be apparent after 1 week of therapy. The effective dosage range of Lopressor tablets is 100 to 450 mg per day. Dosages above 450 mg per day have not been studied. While once-daily dosing is effective and can maintain a reduction in blood pressure throughout the day, lower doses (especially 100 mg) may not maintain a full effect at the end of the 24-hour period, and larger or more frequent daily doses may be required. This can be evaluated by measuring blood pressure near the end of the dosing interval to determine whether satisfactory control is being maintained throughout the day. Beta1 selectivity diminishes as the dose of Lopressor is increased.

Angina Pectoris

The dosage of Lopressor tablets should be individualized. Lopressor tablets should be taken with or immediately following meals.

The usual initial dosage of Lopressor tablets is 100 mg daily, given in two divided doses. gradually increase the dosage at weekly intervals until optimum clinical response has been obtained or there is pronounced slowing of the heart rate. The effective dosage range of Lopressor tablets is 100 to 400 mg per day. Dosages above 400 mg per day have not been studied. If treatment is to be discontinued, gradually decrease the dosage over a period of 1 to 2 weeks (see WARNINGS).

Myocardial Infarction

Early Treatment: During the early phase of definite or suspected acute myocardial infarction, initiate treatment with Lopressor as soon as possible after the patient’s arrival in the hospital. Such treatment should be initiated in a coronary care or similar unit immediately after the patient’s hemodynamic condition has stabilized.

Begin treatment in this early phase with the intravenous administration of three bolus injections of 5 mg of Lopressor each; give the injections at approximately 2-minute intervals. During the intravenous administration of Lopressor, monitor blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram.

In patients who tolerate the full intravenous dose (15 mg), initiate Lopressor tablets, 50 mg every 6 hours, 15 minutes after the last intravenous dose and continue for 48 hours. Thereafter, the maintenance dosage is 100 mg twice daily (see Late Treatment below).

Start patients who appear not to tolerate the full intravenous dose on Lopressor tablets either 25 mg or 50 mg every 6 hours (depending on the degree of intolerance) 15 minutes after the last intravenous dose or as soon as their clinical condition allows. In patients with severe intolerance, discontinue Lopressor (see WARNINGS).

Late Treatment: Start patients with contraindications to treatment during the early phase of suspected or definite myocardial infarction, patients who appear not to tolerate the full early treatment, and patients in whom the physician wishes to delay therapy for any other reason on Lopressor tablets, 100 mg twice daily, as soon as their clinical condition allows. Continue therapy for at least 3 months. Although the efficacy of Lopressor beyond 3 months has not been conclusively established, data from studies with other beta-blockers suggest that treatment should be continued for 1 to 3 years.

Special populations

Pediatric patients: No pediatric studies have been performed. The safety and efficacy of Lopressor in pediatric patients have not been established.

Renal impairment: No dose adjustment of Lopressor is required in patients with renal impairment.

Hepatic impairment: Lopressor blood levels are likely to increase substantially in patients with hepatic impairment. Therefore, Lopressor should be initiated at low doses with cautious gradual dose titration according to clinical response.

Geriatric patients (>65 years): In general, use a low initial starting dose in elderly patients given their greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

Method of administration:

For oral treatment, the tablets should be swallowed un-chewed with a glass of water. Lopressor should always be taken in standardized relation with meals. If the physician asks the patient to take Lopressor either before breakfast or with breakfast, then the patient should continue taking Lopressor with the same schedule during the course of therapy.

HOW SUPPLIED

Lopressor Tablets

m etoprolol tartrate USP Tablets

Tablets 50 mg – capsule-shaped, biconvex, pink, scored (imprinted LOPRESSOR on one side and 458 twice on the scored side)

Bottles of 100………………………………………….………NDC 30698-458-01

Tablets 100 mg – capsule-shaped, biconvex, light blue, scored (imprinted LOPRESSOR on one side and 459 twice on the scored side)

Bottles of 100………………………………………………….NDC 30698-459-01

Storage: Store at 77°F (25°C); excursions permitted to 59° to 86°F (15° to 30°C) [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Protect from moisture and heat.

Dispense in a tight, light-resistant container (USP).

Manufactured for and Distributed by:
Validus Pharmaceuticals LLC
119 Cherry Hill Road, Suite 310
Parsippany, NJ 07054
info@validuspharma.com
www.validuspharma.com
1-866-982-5438 (1-866-9VALIDUS)

Product of Spain

© 2017 Validus Pharmaceuticals LLC

60025-01September 2017

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