Metoprolol Succinate

METOPROLOL SUCCINATE — metoprolol succinate tablet, film coated, extended release
Physicians Total Care, Inc.

WARNING: ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE:

Following abrupt cessation of therapy with certain beta-blocking agents, exacerbations of angina pectoris and, in some cases, myocardial infarction have occurred. When discontinuing chronically administered metoprolol succinate extended-release, particularly in patients with ischemic heart disease, the dosage should be gradually reduced over a period of 1 to 2 weeks and the patient should be carefully monitored. If angina markedly worsens or acute coronary insufficiency develops, metoprolol succinate extended-release administration should be reinstated promptly, at least temporarily, and other measures appropriate for the management of unstable angina should be taken. Warn patients against interruption or discontinuation of therapy without the physician’s advice. Because coronary artery disease is common and may be unrecognized, it may be prudent not to discontinue metoprolol succinate extended-release therapy abruptly even in patients treated only for hypertension (5.1).

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

1.1 Hypertension

Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets USP are indicated for the treatment of hypertension. It may be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2)].

1.2 Angina Pectoris

Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets USP are indicated in the long-term treatment of angina pectoris, to reduce angina attacks and to improve exercise tolerance.

1.3 Heart Failure

Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets USP are indicated for the treatment of stable, symptomatic (NYHA Class II or III) heart failure of ischemic, hypertensive, or cardiomyopathic origin. It was studied in patients already receiving ACE inhibitors, diuretics, and, in the majority of cases, digitalis. In this population, metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets USP decreased the rate of mortality plus hospitalization, largely through a reduction in cardiovascular mortality and hospitalizations for heart failure.

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets are extended release tablets intended for once daily administration. For treatment of hypertension and angina, when switching from immediate release metoprolol to metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets, use the same total daily dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets. Individualize the dosage of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets. Titration may be needed in some patients.

Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets are scored and can be divided; however, do not crush or chew the whole or half tablet.

2.1 Hypertension

The usual initial dosage is 25 mg to 100 mg daily in a single dose. The dosage may be increased at weekly (or longer) intervals until optimum blood pressure reduction is achieved. In general, the maximum effect of any given dosage level will be apparent after 1 week of therapy. Dosages above 400 mg per day have not been studied.

Pediatric Hypertensive Patients ≥ 6 Years of age: A pediatric clinical hypertension study in patients 6 to 16 years of age did not meet its primary endpoint (dose response for reduction in SBP); however some other endpoints demonstrated effectiveness [see USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS (8.4)]. If selected for treatment, the recommended starting dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets is 1.0 mg/kg once daily, but the maximum initial dose should not exceed 50 mg once daily. Dosage should be adjusted according to blood pressure response. Doses above 2.0 mg/kg (or in excess of 200 mg) once daily have not been studied in pediatric patients [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY (12.3)].

Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets are not recommended in pediatric patients < 6 years of age [see USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS (8.4)].

2.2 Angina Pectoris

Individualize the dosage of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets. The usual initial dosage is 100 mg daily, given in a single dose. Gradually increase the dosage at weekly intervals until optimum clinical response has been obtained or there is a pronounced slowing of the heart rate. Dosages above 400 mg per day have not been studied. If treatment is to be discontinued, reduce the dosage gradually over a period of 1 to 2 weeks [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS (5)].

2.3 Heart Failure

Dosage must be individualized and closely monitored during up-titration. Prior to initiation of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets, stabilize the dose of other heart failure drug therapy. The recommended starting dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets is 25 mg once daily for two weeks in patients with NYHA Class II heart failure and 12.5 mg once daily in patients with more severe heart failure. Double the dose every two weeks to the highest dosage level tolerated by the patient or up to 200 mg of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets. Initial difficulty with titration should not preclude later attempts to introduce metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets. If patients experience symptomatic bradycardia, reduce the dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets. If transient worsening of heart failure occurs, consider treating with increased doses of diuretics, lowering the dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets or temporarily discontinuing it. The dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release tablets should not be increased until symptoms of worsening heart failure have been stabilized.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

25 mg tablets: White, oval-shaped, biconvex, film-coated tablet debossed “E 281” on one side and scored on the other side.

50 mg tablets: White, capsule-shaped, biconvex, film-coated tablet debossed “E 282” on one side and scored on the other side.

100 mg tablets: White, capsule-shaped, biconvex, film-coated tablet debossed “E 283” on one side and scored on the other side.

200 mg tablets: White, oval-shaped, biconvex, film-coated tablet debossed “E 284” on one side and scored on the other side.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

Metoprolol succinate extended-release is contraindicated in severe bradycardia, second or third degree heart block, cardiogenic shock, decompensated cardiac failure, sick sinus syndrome (unless a permanent pacemaker is in place), and in patients who are hypersensitive to any component of this product.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Ischemic Heart Disease

Following abrupt cessation of therapy with certain beta-blocking agents, exacerbations of angina pectoris and, in some cases, myocardial infarction have occurred. When discontinuing chronically administered metoprolol succinate extended-release, particularly in patients with ischemic heart disease gradually reduce the dosage over a period of 1 to 2 weeks and monitor the patient. If angina markedly worsens or acute coronary ischemia develops, promptly reinstate metoprolol succinate extended-release, and take measures appropriate for the management of unstable angina. Warn patients not to interrupt therapy without their physician’s advice. Because coronary artery disease is common and may be unrecognized, avoid abruptly discontinuing metoprolol succinate extended-release in patients treated only for hypertension.

5.2 Heart Failure

Worsening cardiac failure may occur during up-titration of metoprolol succinate extended-release. If such symptoms occur, increase diuretics and restore clinical stability before advancing the dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION (2)]. It may be necessary to lower the dose of metoprolol succinate extended-release or temporarily discontinue it. Such episodes do not preclude subsequent successful titration of metoprolol succinate extended-release.

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