Nabumetone (Page 2 of 6)

Hepatic Impairment:

Data in patients with severe hepatic impairment are limited. Biotransformation of nabumetone to 6MNA and the further metabolism of 6MNA to inactive metabolites is dependent on hepatic function and could be reduced in patients with severe hepatic impairment (history of or biopsy-proven cirrhosis).

Special Studies:

Gastrointestinal:

Nabumetone was compared to aspirin in inducing gastrointestinal blood loss. Food intake was not monitored. Studies utilizing 51 Cr-tagged red blood cells in healthy males showed no difference in fecal blood loss after 3 or 4 weeks’ administration of 1,000 mg or 2,000 mg of nabumetone daily when compared to either placebo-treated or nontreated subjects. In contrast, aspirin 3,600 mg daily produced an increase in fecal blood loss when compared to subjects who received nabumetone, placebo, or no treatment. The clinical relevance of the data is unknown.

The following endoscopy trials entered patients who had been previously treated with NSAIDs. These patients had varying baseline scores and different courses of treatment. The trials were not designed to correlate symptoms and endoscopy scores. The clinical relevance of these endoscopy trials, i.e., either G.I. symptoms or serious G.1. events, is not known.

Ten endoscopy studies were conducted in 488 patients who had baseline and post-treatment endoscopy. In 5 clinical trials that compared a total of 194 patients on 1,000 mg of nabumetone daily or naproxen 250 mg or 500 mg twice daily for 3to 12 weeks, treatment with nabumetone resulted in fewer patients with endoscopically detected lesions (>3 mm). In 2 trials a total of 101 patients administered 1,000 mg or 2,000 mg of nabumetone daily or piroxicam 10 mg to 20 mg for 7 to 10 days, there were fewer patients treated with nabumetone with endoscopically detected lesions. In 3 trials of a total of 47 patients on 1,000 mg of nabumetone daily or indomethacin 100 mg to 150 mg daily for 3 to 4 weeks, the endoscopy scores were higher with indomethacin. Another 12-week trial in a total of 171 patients compared the results of treatment with 1,000 mg of nabumetone daily to ibuprofen 2,400 mg/day and ibuprofen 2,400 mg/day plus misoprostol 800 mcg/day. The results showed that patients treated with nabumetone had a lower number of endoscopically detected lesions (>5 mm) than patients treated with ibuprofen alone but comparable to the combination of ibuprofen plus misoprostol. The results did not correlate with abdominal pain.

Other:

In 1-week, repeat-dose studies in healthy volunteers, 1,000 mg of nabumetone daily had little effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation and no effect on bleeding time. In comparison, naproxen 500 mg daily suppressed collagen-induced platelet aggregation and significantly increased bleeding time.

CLINICAL TRIALS

Osteoarthritis:

The use of nabumetone in relieving the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) was assessed in double-blind, controlled trials in which 1,047 patients were treated for 6 weeks to 6 months. In these trials, nabumetone in a dose of 1,000 mg/day administered at night was comparable to naproxen 500 mg/day and to aspirin 3,600 mg/day.

Rheumatoid Arthritis:

The use of nabumetone in relieving the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was assessed in double-blind, randomized, controlled trials in which 770 patients were treated for 3 weeks to 6 months. Nabumetone, in a dose of 1,000 mg/day administered at night, was comparable to naproxen 500 mg/day and to aspirin 3,600 mg/day.

In controlled clinical trials of rheumatoid arthritis patients, nabumetone has been used in combination with gold, d-penicillamine, and corticosteroids.

Patient Exposure in Clinical Trials of Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis:

In clinical trials with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients, most patients responded to nabumetone in doses of 1,000 mg/day administered nightly; total daily dosages up to 2,000 mg were used. In open-labelled studies, 1,490 patients were permitted dosage increases and were followed for approximately 1 year (mode). Twenty percent of patients (n = 294) were withdrawn for lack of effectiveness during the first year of these open-labelled studies. The following table provides patient exposure to doses used in the US clinical trials:

Table 2
(click image for full-size original)

Table 2. Clinical Double-Blinded and Open-Labelled Trials of nabumetone in Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

As with other NSAIDs, the lowest dose should be sought for each patient. Patients weighing under 50 kg may be less likely to require dosages beyond 1,000 mg; therefore, after observing the response to initial therapy, the dose should be adjusted to meet individual patients’ requirements.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Carefully consider the potential benefits and risks of nabumetone tablets and other treatment options before deciding to use nabumetone tablets. Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals (see WARNINGS).

Nabumetone tablets are indicated for relief of signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Nabumetone tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to nabumetone or its excipients.

Nabumetone tablets should not be given to patients who have experienced asthma, urticaria, or allergic-type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs. Severe, rarely fatal, anaphylactic-like reactions to NSAIDs have been reported in such patients (see WARNINGS: Anaphylactoid Reactions: , and PRECAUTIONS: General: Pre-existing Asthma:)

Nabumetone tablets are contraindicated for the treatment of peri-operative pain in the setting of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (see WARNINGS).

WARNINGS

CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS

Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events:

Clinical trials of several COX-2 selective and nonselective NSAIDs of up to 3 years duration have shown an increased risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, which can be fatal. All NSAIDs, both COX-2 selective and nonselective, may have a similar risk. Patients with known CV disease or risk factors for CV disease may be at greater risk. To minimize the potential risk for an adverse CV event in patients treated with an NSAID, the lowest effective dose should be used for the shortest duration possible. Physicians and patients should remain alert for the development of such events, even in the absence of previous CV symptoms. Patients should be informed about the signs and/or symptoms of serious CV events and the steps to take if they occur.

There is no consistent evidence that concurrent use of aspirin mitigates the increased risk of serious CV thrombotic events associated with NSAID use. The concurrent use of aspirin and an NSAID does increase the risk of serious Gl events (see WARNINGS, Gastrointestinal Effects-Risk of Ulceration, Bleeding, and Perforation).

Two large, controlled, clinical trials of a COX-2 selective NSAID for the treatment of pain in the first 10 to 14 days following CABG surgery found an increased incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Hypertension:

NSAIDs, including nabumetone tablets, can lead to onset of new hypertension or worsening of preexisting hypertension, either of which may contribute to the increased incidence of CV events. Patients taking thiazides or loop diuretics may have impaired response to these therapies when taking NSAIDs. NSAIDs, including nabumetone tablets, should be used with caution in patients with hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) should be monitored closely during the initiation of NSAID treatment and throughout the course of therapy.

All MedLibrary.org resources are included in as near-original form as possible, meaning that the information from the original provider has been rendered here with only typographical or stylistic modifications and not with any substantive alterations of content, meaning or intent.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only, in accordance with our Terms of Use, and is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a medical doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner or other qualified health professional.

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2021. All Rights Reserved.