Nifedipine (Page 4 of 5)

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Nifedipine was administered orally to rats for two years and was not shown to be carcinogenic. When given to rats prior to mating, nifedipine caused reduced fertility at a dose approximately 30 times the maximum recommended human dose. There is a literature report of reversible reduction in the ability of human sperm obtained from a limited number of infertile men taking recommended doses of nifedipine to bind to and fertilize an ovum in vitro. In vivo mutagenicity studies were negative.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C.

In rodents, rabbits and monkeys, nifedipine has been shown to have a variety of embryotoxic, placentotoxic, teratogenic and fetotoxic effects, including stunted fetuses (rats, mice and rabbits), digital anomalies (rats and rabbits), rib deformities (mice), cleft palate (mice), small placentas and underdeveloped chorionic villi (monkeys), embryonic and fetal deaths (rats, mice and rabbits), prolonged pregnancy (rats; not evaluated in other species), and decreased neonatal survival (rats; not evaluated in other species). On a mg/kg or mg/m 2 basis, some of the doses associated with these various effects are higher than the maximum recommended human dose and some are lower, but all are within an order of magnitude of it.

The digital anomalies seen in nifedipine-exposed rabbit pups are strikingly similar to those seen in pups exposed to phenytoin, and these are in turn similar to the phalangeal deformities that are the most common malformation seen in human children with in utero exposure to phenytoin.

From the clinical evidence available, a specific prenatal risk has not been identified. However, an increase in perinatal asphyxia, caesarean delivery, prematurity and intrauterine growth retardation have been reported.

Careful monitoring of blood pressure must be exercised in pregnant women, when administering nifedipine in combination with IV magnesium sulfate due to the possibility of an excessive fall in blood pressure which could harm the mother and fetus.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.

Nursing Mothers

Nifedipine is excreted in human milk. Nursing mothers are advised not to breastfeed their babies when taking the drug.

Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of nifedipine extended-release tablets in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Although small pharmacokinetic studies have identified an increased half-life and increased C max and AUC (See CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY: Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism), clinical studies of nifedipine did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

Patients with Galactose Intolerance

Since this medicinal product contains lactose, patients with rare hereditary problems of galactose intolerance, the Lapp lactase deficiency or glucose-galactose malabsorption should not take this medicine.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The incidence of adverse events during treatment with nifedipine extendedrelease tablets in doses up to 90 mg daily were derived from multi-center placebo-controlled clinical trials in 370 hypertensive patients. Atenolol 50 mg once daily was used concomitantly in 187 of the 370 patients on nifedipine extendedrelease tablets and in 64 of the 126 patients on placebo. All adverse events reported during nifedipine extendedrelease tablets therapy were tabulated independently of their causal relationship to medication.

The most common adverse event reported with nifedipine extendedrelease tablets was peripheral edema. This was dose related and the frequency was 18% on nifedipine extendedrelease tablets 30 mg daily, 22% on nifedipine extendedrelease tablets 60 mg daily and 29% on nifedipine extendedrelease tablets 90 mg daily versus 10% on placebo.

Other common adverse events reported in the above placebo-controlled trials include:

Where the frequency of adverse events with nifedipine extended-release tablets and placebo is similar, causal relationship cannot be established.

The following adverse events were reported with an incidence of 3% or less in daily doses up to 90 mg:

Body as a Whole/Systemic: chest pain, leg pain

Central Nervous System: paresthesia, vertigo

Dermatologic: rash

Gastrointestinal: constipation

Musculoskeletal: leg cramps

Respiratory: epistaxis, rhinitis

Urogenital: impotence, urinary frequency

Other adverse events reported with an incidence of less than 1.0% were:

Body as a Whole/Systemic: allergic reaction, asthenia, cellulitis, substernal chest pain, chills, facial edema, lab test abnormal, malaise, neck pain, pelvic pain, pain, photosensitivity reaction

Cardiovascular: atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, cardiac arrest, extrasystole, hypotension, migraine, palpitations, phlebitis, postural hypotension, tachycardia, cutaneous angiectases

Central Nervous System: anxiety, confusion, decreased libido, depression, hypertonia, hypesthesia, insomnia, somnolence

Dermatologic: angioedema, petechial rash, pruritus, sweating

Gastrointestinal: abdominal pain, diarrhea, dry mouth, dysphagia, dyspepsia, eructation, esophagitis, flatulence, gastrointestinal disorder, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, GGT increased, gum disorder, gum hemorrhage, vomiting

Hematologic: eosinophilia, lymphadenopathy

Metabolic: gout, weight loss

Musculoskeletal: arthralgia, arthritis, joint disorder, myalgia, myasthenia

Respiratory: dyspnea, increased cough, rales, pharyngitis, stridor

Special Senses: abnormal vision, amblyopia, conjunctivitis, diplopia, eye disorder, eye hemorrhage, tinnitus

Urogenital/Reproductive: dysuria, kidney calculus, nocturia, breast engorgement, polyuria, urogenital disorder, erectile dysfunction (ED)

The following adverse events have been reported rarely in patients given nifedipine in coat core or other formulations: allergenic hepatitis, alopecia, anaphylactic reaction, anemia, arthritis with ANA (+), depression, erythromelalgia, exfoliative dermatitis, fever, gingival hyperplasia, gynecomastia, hyperglycemia, jaundice, leukopenia, mood changes, muscle cramps, nervousness, paranoid syndrome, purpura, shakiness, sleep disturbances, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, syncope, taste perversion, thrombocytopenia, toxic epidermal necrolysis, transient blindness at the peak of plasma level, tremor and urticaria.

OVERDOSAGE

Experience with nifedipine overdosage is limited. Symptoms associated with severe nifedipine overdosage include loss of consciousness, drop in blood pressure, heart rhythm disturbances, metabolic acidosis, hypoxia, cardiogenic shock with pulmonary edema. Generally, overdosage with nifedipine leading to pronounced hypotension calls for active cardiovascular support including monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory function, elevation of extremities, judicious use of calcium infusion, pressor agents and fluids. After oral ingestion, thorough gastric lavage is indicated, if necessary in combination with irrigation of the small intestine. In cases involving overdosage of a slow-release product like nifedipine, elimination must be as complete as possible, including from the small intestine, to prevent the subsequent absorption of the active substance. Additional liquid or volume must be administered with caution because of the risk of fluid overload.

Clearance of nifedipine would be expected to be prolonged in patients with impaired liver function. Since nifedipine is highly protein bound, dialysis is not likely to be of any benefit; however, plasmapheresis may be beneficial.

There has been one reported case of massive overdosage with tablets of another extended release formulation of nifedipine. The main effects of ingestion of approximately 4800 mg of nifedipine in a young man attempting suicide as a result of cocaine-induced depression was initial dizziness, palpitations, flushing, and nervousness. Within several hours of ingestion, nausea, vomiting, and generalized edema developed. No significant hypotension was apparent at presentation, 18 hours post ingestion. Blood chemistry abnormalities consisted of a mild, transient elevation of serum creatinine, and modest elevations of LDH and CPK, but normal SGOT. Vital signs remained stable, no electrocardiographic abnormalities were noted and renal function returned to normal within 24 to 48 hours with routine supportive measures alone. No prolonged sequelae were observed.

The effect of a single 900 mg ingestion of nifedipine capsules in a depressed anginal patient on tricyclic antidepressants was loss of consciousness within 30 minutes of ingestion, and profound hypotension, which responded to calcium infusion, pressor agents, and fluid replacement. A variety of ECG abnormalities were seen in this patient with a history of bundle branch block, including sinus bradycardia and varying degrees of AV block. These dictated the prophylactic placement of a temporary ventricular pacemaker, but otherwise resolved spontaneously. Significant hyperglycemia was seen initially in this patient, but plasma glucose levels rapidly normalized without further treatment.

A young hypertensive patient with advanced renal failure ingested 280 mg of nifedipine capsules at one time, with resulting marked hypotension responding to calcium infusion and fluids. No AV conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias, or pronounced changes in heart rate were noted, nor was there any further deterioration in renal function.

Bradycardiac heart rhythm disturbances may be treated symptomatically with ß-sympathomimetics, and in life-threatening bradycardiac disturbances of heart rhythm temporary pacemaker therapy can be advisable.

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