NitroMist (Page 2 of 4)

7.2 Antihypertensives

Patients receiving antihypertensive drugs, beta-adrenergic blockers, and nitrates should be observed for possible additive hypotensive effects. Marked orthostatic hypotension has been reported when calcium channel blockers and organic nitrates were used concomitantly.

Labetolol blunts the reflex tachycardia produced by nitroglycerin without preventing its hypotensive effects. If labetolol is used with nitroglycerin in patients with angina pectoris, additional hypotensive effects may occur.

7.3 Aspirin

Coadministration of aspirin and nitroglycerin has been reported to result in increased nitroglycerin maximum concentrations by as much as 67% and AUC by 73% when administered as a single dose. The vasodilatory and hemodynamic effects of nitroglycerin may be enhanced by concomitant administration of aspirin.

7.4 Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator (t-PA)

Intravenous administration of nitroglycerin decreases the thrombolytic effect of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA). Plasma levels of t-PA are reduced when coadministered with nitroglycerin. Therefore, caution should be observed in patients receiving nitroglycerin during t-PA therapy.

7.5 Heparin

Intravenous nitroglycerin reduces the anticoagulant effect of heparin. Activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) should be monitored in patients receiving heparin and intravenous nitroglycerin. It is not known if this effect occurs following single nitroglycerin doses.

7.6 Ergotamine

Oral administration of nitroglycerin markedly decreases the first-pass metabolism of dihydroergotamine and subsequently increases its oral bioavailability. Ergotamine is known to precipitate angina pectoris. Therefore, patients receiving sublingual nitroglycerin should avoid ergotamine and related drugs or be monitored for symptoms of ergotism if this is not possible.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Pregnancy category C: Animal reproduction and teratogenicity studies have not been conducted with NitroMist or nitroglycerin sublingual tablets. It is also not known whether NitroMist can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. A teratogenicity study was conducted in the third mating of F0 generation female rats administered dietary nitroglycerin for gestation day 6 to day 15 at dose levels used in the 3-generation reproduction study. In offspring of the high-dose nitroglycerin group, increased incidence of diaphragmatic hernias and decreased hyoid bone ossification were seen. The latter finding probably reflects delayed development rather than a potential teratogenic effect, thus indicating no clear evidence of teratogenicity of nitroglycerin.

There are no adequate and well controlled studies in pregnant women. NitroMist should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

8.3 Nursing Mothers

It is not known whether nitroglycerin is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when NitroMist is administered to a nursing woman.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of nitroglycerin in pediatric patients have not been established.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of NitroMist did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between elderly (greater than or equal to 65 years) and younger (less than 65 years) patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

10 OVERDOSAGE

Signs and symptoms of hemodynamic effects: The effects of nitroglycerin overdose are generally the results of nitroglycerin’s capacity to induce vasodilatation, venous pooling, reduced cardiac output, and hypotension. These hemodynamic changes may have protean manifestations, including increased intracranial pressure with any or all of persistent throbbing headache, confusion, and moderate fever; vertigo; palpitations; tachycardia; visual disturbances; nausea and vomiting (possibly with colic and even bloody diarrhea); syncope (especially in the upright posture); dyspnea, later followed by reduced ventilatory effort, diaphoresis, with the skin either flushed or cold and clammy; heart block and bradycardia; paralysis; coma; seizures; and death.

No specific antagonist to the vasodilator effects of nitroglycerin is known, and no intervention has been subject to controlled study as a therapy of nitroglycerin overdose. Because the hypotension associated with nitroglycerin overdose is the result of venodilatation and arterial hypovolemia, prudent therapy in this situation should be directed toward increase in central fluid volume. Passive elevation of the patient’s legs may be sufficient, but intravenous infusion of normal saline or similar fluid may also be necessary.

The use of epinephrine or other arterial vasoconstrictors in this setting is not recommended.

In patients with renal disease or congestive heart failure, therapy resulting in central volume expansion is not without hazard. Treatment of nitroglycerin overdose in these patients may be subtle and difficult, and invasive monitoring may be required.

Methemoglobinemia: Methemoglobinemia has been rarely reported with organic nitrates. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who exhibit signs of impaired oxygen delivery despite adequate arterial PO2 . Classically, methemoglobinemic blood is described as chocolate brown, without color change on exposure to air.

If methemoglobinemia is present, intravenous administration of methylene blue, 1 mg/kg to 2 mg/kg of body weight, may be required.

11 DESCRIPTION

Nitroglycerin, an organic nitrate, is a vasodilator which has effects on both arteries and veins. The chemical name for nitroglycerin is 1,2,3-propanetriol trinitrate (C3 H5 N3 O9 ). The compound has a molecular weight of 227.09. The chemical structure is:

CH2 – ONO2

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CH – ONO2

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CH2 – ONO2

NitroMist (nitroglycerin) lingual aerosol is a metered-dose spray containing 230 metered sprays or 90 metered sprays of nitroglycerin per container. This product delivers 400 mcg of nitroglycerin per actuation in the form of spray droplets on or under the tongue. Inactive ingredients: caprylic/capric diglycerol succinate, peppermint oil, L(-)-menthol, n-butane.

12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

12.1 Mechanism of Action

Nitroglycerin forms free radical nitric oxide (NO), which activates guanylate cyclase, resulting in an increase of guanosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in smooth muscle and other tissues. This eventually leads to dephosphorylation of myosin light chains, which regulates the contractile state in smooth muscle and results in vasodilatation.

12.2 Pharm a codynamics

The principal pharmacological action of nitroglycerin is relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Although venous effects predominate, nitroglycerin produces, in a dose-related manner, dilation of both arterial and venous beds. Dilation of the postcapillary vessels, including large veins, promotes peripheral pooling of blood, decreases venous return to the heart, and reduces left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (preload). Nitroglycerin also produces arteriolar relaxation, thereby reducing peripheral vascular resistance and arterial pressure (after load), and dilates large epicardial coronary arteries; however, the extent to which this latter effect contributes to the relief of exertional angina is unclear.

Therapeutic doses of nitroglycerin may reduce systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure. Effective coronary perfusion pressure is usually maintained, but can be compromised if blood pressure falls excessively or increased heart rate decreases diastolic filling time.

Elevated central venous and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures, and pulmonary and systemic vascular resistance are also reduced by nitroglycerin therapy. Heart rate is usually slightly increased, presumably a reflex response to the fall in blood pressure. Cardiac index may be increased, decreased, or unchanged. Myocardial oxygen consumption or demand (as measured by the pressure-rate product, tension-time index, and stroke-work index) is decreased and a more favorable supply-demand ratio can be achieved. Patients with elevated left ventricular filling pressure and increased systemic vascular resistance in association with a depressed cardiac index are likely to experience an improvement in cardiac index. In contrast, when filling pressures and cardiac index are normal, cardiac index may be slightly reduced following nitroglycerin administration.

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