Ofloxacin Otic (Page 2 of 4)

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category C.

Ofloxacin has been shown to have an embryocidal effect in rats at a dose of 810 mg/kg/day and in rabbits at 160 mg/kg/day.

These dosages resulted in decreased fetal body weights and increased fetal mortality in rats and rabbits, respectively. Minor fetal skeletal variations were reported in rats receiving doses of 810 mg/kg/day. Ofloxacin has not been shown to be teratogenic at doses as high as 810 mg/kg/day and 160 mg/kg/day when administered to pregnant rats and rabbits, respectively.

Ofloxacin has not been shown to have any adverse effects on the developing embryo or fetus at doses relevant to the amount of ofloxacin that will be delivered ototopically at the recommended clinical doses.

Nonteratogenic Effects

Additional studies in the rat demonstrated that doses up to 360 mg/kg/day during late gestation had no adverse effects on late fetal development, labor, delivery, lactation, neonatal viability, or growth of the newborn. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Ofloxacin otic solution should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nursing Mothers

In nursing women, a single 200 mg oral dose resulted in concentrations of ofloxacin in milk which were similar to those found in plasma. It is not known whether ofloxacin is excreted in human milk following topical otic administration. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions from ofloxacin in nursing infants, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Pediatric Use

Safety and efficacy have been demonstrated in pediatric patients of the following ages for the listed indications:

  • six months and older: otitis externa with intact tympanic membranes
  • one year and older: acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes
  • twelve years and older: chronic suppurative otitis media with perforated tympanic membranes

Safety and efficacy in pediatric patients below these ages have not been established.

Although no data are available on patients less than age 6 months, there are no known safety concerns or differences in the disease process in this population that will preclude use of this product.

No changes in hearing function occurred in 30 pediatric subjects treated with ofloxacin otic and tested for audiometric parameters.
Although quinolones, including ofloxacin, have been shown to cause arthropathy in immature animals after systemic administration, young growing guinea pigs dosed in the middle ear with 0.3% ofloxacin otic solution for one month showed no systemic effects, quinolone-induced lesions, erosions of the cartilage in weight-bearing joints, or other signs of arthropathy.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Subjects with Otitis Externa

In the phase III clinical trials performed in support of once-daily dosing, 799 subjects with otitis externa and intact tympanic membranes were treated with ofloxacin otic solution. The studies, which served as the basis for approval, were 020 (pediatric, adolescents and adults), 016 (adolescents and adults) and 017 (pediatric). The following treatment-related adverse events occurred in two or more of the subjects.

Incidence Rate

Adverse Event
Studies 002/003*
BID
(N=229)
Studies 016/017
QD
(N=310)
Study 020
QD
(N=489)
*
Studies 002/003 (BID) and 016/017 (QD) were active-controlled and comparative. Study 020 (QD) was open and non-comparative.
Application Site Reaction 3% 16.8% 0.6%
Pruritus 4% 1.2% 1.0%
Earache 1% 0.6% 0.8%
Dizziness 1% 0.0% 0.6%
Headache 0% 0.3% 0.2%
Vertigo 1% 0.0% 0.0%

An unexpected increased incidence of application site reaction was seen in studies 016/017 and was similar for both ofloxacin and the active control drug (neomycin-polymyxin B sulfate-hydrocortisone). This finding is believed to be the result of specific questioning of the subjects regarding the incidence of application site reactions.

In once daily dosing studies, there were also single reports of nausea, seborrhea, transient loss of hearing, tinnitus, otitis externa, otitis media, tremor, hypertension and fungal infection.

In twice daily dosing studies, the following treatment-related adverse events were each reported in a single subject: dermatitis, eczema, erythematous rash, follicular rash, hypoaesthesia, tinnitus, dyspepsia, hot flushes, flushing and otorrhagia.

Subjects with Acute Otitis Media with Tympanostomy Tubes (AOM TT) and Subjects with Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) with Perforated Tympanic Membranes

In phase III clinical trials which formed the basis for approval, the following treatment-related adverse events occurred in 1% or more of the 656 subjects with non-intact tympanic membranes in AOM TT or CSOM treated twice-daily with ofloxacin otic solution:

Adverse Event Incidence (N=656)
Taste Perversion 7%
Earache 1%
Pruritus 1%
Paraesthesia 1%
Rash 1%
Dizziness 1%

Other treatment-related adverse reactions reported in subjects with non-intact tympanic membranes included: diarrhea (0.6%), nausea (0.3%), vomiting (0.3%), dry mouth (0.5%), headache (0.3%), vertigo (0.5%), otorrhagia (0.6%), tinnitus (0.3%), fever (0.3%). The following treatment-related adverse events were each reported in a single subject: application site reaction, otitis externa, urticaria, abdominal pain, dysaesthesia, hyperkinesia, halitosis, inflammation, pain, insomnia, coughing, pharyngitis, rhinitis, sinusitis, and tachycardia.

Post-marketing Adverse Events

Cases of uncommon transient neurospsychiatric disturbances have been included in spontaneous post-marketing reports. A causal relationship with ofloxacin otic solution 0.3% is unknown.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Otitis Externa

The recommended dosage regimen for the treatment of otitis externa is:

For pediatric patients (from 6 months to 13 years old): Five drops (0.25 mL, 0.75 mg ofloxacin) instilled into the affected ear once daily for seven days.
For patients 13 years and older: Ten drops (0.5 mL, 1.5 mg ofloxacin) instilled into the affected ear once daily for seven days.
The solution should be warmed by holding the bottle in the hand for one or two minutes to avoid dizziness which may result from the instillation of a cold solution. The patient should lie with the affected ear upward, and then the drops should be instilled. This position should be maintained for five minutes to facilitate penetration of the drops into the ear canal. Repeat, if necessary, for the opposite ear.

All MedLibrary.org resources are included in as near-original form as possible, meaning that the information from the original provider has been rendered here with only typographical or stylistic modifications and not with any substantive alterations of content, meaning or intent.

This site is provided for educational and informational purposes only, in accordance with our Terms of Use, and is not intended as a substitute for the advice of a medical doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner or other qualified health professional.

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2020. All Rights Reserved.