Propoxyphene Napsylate and Acetaminophen (Page 2 of 5)

Pediatric Patients

Neither propoxyphene alone nor in combination with acetaminophen has been studied in pediatric patients.

Hepatic Impairment

No formal pharmacokinetic study of either propoxyphene alone or in combination with acetaminophen has been conducted in patients with mild, moderate or severe hepatic impairment.

After oral administration of propoxyphene in patients with cirrhosis, plasma concentrations of propoxyphene were considerably higher and norpropoxyphene concentrations were much lower than in control patients. This is presumably because of a decreased first-pass metabolism of orally administered propoxyphene in these patients. The AUC ratio of norpropoxyphene: propoxyphene was significantly lower in patients with cirrhosis (0.5 to 0.9) than in controls (2.5 to 4).

Compared to healthy subjects, acetaminophen had a lower total clearance and longer half-life in patients with liver disease. Decreased metabolite formation clearance (8 to 42%) was observed in subjects with liver disease compared to healthy subjects after both single and multiple-doses (at steady state). In addition, there is an increase in the amount of acetaminophen excreted unchanged in the urine (4.7% vs. 2.5%) in patients with liver disease compared to healthy subjects after repeat doses, suggesting that more acetaminophen was excreted by renal elimination in the liver disease state.

Renal Impairment

No formal pharmacokinetic study of either propoxyphene alone or in combination with acetaminophen has been conducted in patients with mild, moderate or severe renal impairment.

After oral administration of propoxyphene in anephric patients, the AUC and Cmax values were an average of 76% and 88% greater, respectively. Dialysis removes only insignificant amounts (8%) of administered dose of propoxyphene.

Drug Interactions

The metabolism of propoxyphene may be altered by strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (such as ritonavir, ketoconazole, itraconazole, troleandomycin, clarithromycin, nelfinavir, nefazadone, amiodarone, amprenavir, aprepitant, diltiazem, erythromycin, fluconazole, fosamprenavir, grapefruit juice, and verapamil) leading to enhanced propoxyphene plasma levels. On the other hand, strong CYP3A4 inducers such as rifampin may lead to enhanced metabolite (norpropoxyphene) levels.

Propoxyphene is also thought to possess CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzyme inhibiting properties. Coadministration with a drug that is a substrate of CYP3A4 or CYP2D6, may result in higher plasma concentrations and increased pharmacologic or adverse effects of that drug.

CLINICAL STUDIES

The efficacy of propoxyphene in combination with acetaminophen was studied in seven single-dose, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in patients with mild to severe postpartum pain. One of the studies demonstrated that both propoxyphene and acetaminophen in the combination contributed to a greater reduction in pain than acetaminophen and propoxyphene alone and that propoxyphene was superior to placebo.

There is insufficient information available to assess efficacy of propoxyphene in combination with acetaminophen in patients with chronic pain.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are indicated for the relief of mild to moderate pain.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to propoxyphene or acetaminophen.

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in patients with significant respiratory depression (in unmonitored settings or the absence of resuscitative equipment) and patients with acute or severe asthma or hypercarbia.

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are contraindicated in any patient who has or is suspected of having paralytic ileus.

WARNINGS

Risk of Overdose

There have been numerous cases of accidental and intentional overdose with propoxyphene products either alone or in combination with other CNS depressants, including alcohol. Fatalities within the first hour of overdosage are not uncommon. Many of the propoxyphene-related deaths have occurred in patients with previous histories of emotional disturbances or suicidal ideation/attempts and/or concomitant administration of sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, or other CNS-depressant drugs. Do not prescribe propoxyphene for patients who are suicidal or have a history of suicidal ideation.

Respiratory Depression

Respiratory depression is the chief hazard from all opioid agonist preparations. Respiratory depression occurs most frequently in elderly or debilitated patients, usually following large initial doses in non-tolerant patients, or when opioids are given in conjunction with other agents that depress respiration. Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets should be used with extreme caution in patients with significant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cor pulmonale, and in patients having substantially decreased respiratory reserve, hypoxia, hypercapnia, or preexisting respiratory depression. In such patients, even usual therapeutic doses of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets may decrease respiratory drive to the point of apnea. In these patients alternative non-opioid analgesics should be considered, and opioids should be employed only under careful medical supervision at the lowest effective dose.

Hypotensive Effect

Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets, like all opioid analgesics, may cause severe hypotension in an individual whose ability to maintain blood pressure has been compromised by a depleted blood volume, or after concurrent administration with drugs such as phenothiazines or other agents which compromise vasomotor tone. Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets may produce orthostatic hypotension in ambulatory patients. Propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets, like all opioid analgesics, should be administered with caution to patients in circulatory shock, since vasodilatation produced by the drug may further reduce cardiac output and blood pressure.

Head Injury and Increased Intracranial Pressure

The respiratory depressant effects of narcotics and their capacity to elevate cerebrospinal fluid pressure may be markedly exaggerated in the presence of head injury, other intracranial lesions or a preexisting increase in intracranial pressure. Furthermore, narcotics produce adverse reactions which may obscure the clinical course of patients with head injuries.

Drug Interactions

The concomitant use of propoxyphene and CNS depressants, including alcohol, can result in potentially serious adverse events including death. Because of its added depressant effects, propoxyphene should be prescribed with caution for those patients whose medical condition requires the concomitant administration of sedatives, tranquilizers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, or other CNS-depressant drugs.

Usage in Ambulatory Patients

Propoxyphene may impair the mental and/or physical abilities required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks, such as driving a car or operating machinery. The patient should be cautioned accordingly.

Use With Other Acetaminophen-Containing Agents

Due to the potential for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity at doses higher than the recommended dose, propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets should not be used concomitantly with other acetaminophen-containing products.

Use With Alcohol

Hepatotoxicity and severe hepatic failure occurred in chronic alcoholics following therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. Patients should be cautioned about the concomitant use of propoxyphene products and alcohol because of potentially serious CNS-additive effects of these agents that can lead to death.

PRECAUTIONS

Tolerance and Physical Dependence

Tolerance is the need for increasing doses of opioids to maintain a defined effect such as analgesia (in the absence of disease progression or other external factors). Physical dependence is manifested by withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation of a drug or upon administration of an antagonist. Physical dependence and tolerance are not unusual during chronic opioid therapy.

The opioid abstinence or withdrawal syndrome is characterized by some or all of the following: restlessness, lacrimation, rhinorrhea, yawning, perspiration, chills, myalgia, and mydriasis. Other symptoms also may develop, including: irritability, anxiety, backache, joint pain, weakness, abdominal cramps, insomnia, nausea, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, or increased blood pressure, respiratory rate, or heart rate. In general, opioids should not be abruptly discontinued (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION , Cessation of Therapy).

If propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets are abruptly discontinued in a physically dependent patient, an abstinence syndrome may occur (see DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE). If signs and symptoms of withdrawal occur, patients should be treated by reinstitution of opioid therapy followed by gradual tapered dose reduction of propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen tablets combined with symptomatic support (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION , Cessation of Therapy).

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