QNASL (Page 3 of 8)

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

In addition to adverse reactions reported from clinical trials for QNASL Nasal Aerosol, the following adverse events have been reported during postmarketing use of QNASL Nasal Aerosol or other intranasal and inhaled formulations of beclomethasone dipropionate. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. These events have been chosen for inclusion due to either their seriousness, frequency of reporting, or causal connection to beclomethasone dipropionate or a combination of these factors.

QNASL Nasal Aerosol: sneezing, burning sensation

Intranasal beclomethasone dipropionate: Nasal septal perforation, blurred vision, glaucoma, cataracts, central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC), loss of taste and smell, and hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis, angioedema, rash, and urticaria have been reported following intranasal administration of beclomethasone dipropionate.

Inhaled beclomethasone dipropionate: Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, angioedema, rash, urticaria, and bronchospasm have been reported following the oral inhalation of beclomethasone dipropionate.

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

No drug interaction studies have been performed with QNASL Nasal Aerosol.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Risk Summary

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies with QNASL Nasal Aerosol or beclomethasone dipropionate in pregnant women. No published studies, including studies of large birth registries, have to date related the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) or intranasal corticosteroids to any increases in congenital malformations or other adverse perinatal outcomes. Thus, available human data do not establish the presence or absence of drug‑associated risk to the fetus. In animal reproduction studies, beclomethasone dipropionate resulted in adverse developmental effects in mice and rabbits at subcutaneous doses equal to or greater than approximately 1.5 times the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) in adults (0.32 mg/day) (see Data). In rats exposed to beclomethasone dipropionate by inhalation, dose‑related gross injury to the fetal adrenal glands was observed at doses greater than 350 times the MRHD, but there was no evidence of external or skeletal malformations or embryolethality at inhalation doses of up to 860 times the MRHD.

The estimated background risk of major birth defects and miscarriage for the indicated population(s) are unknown. In the US general population, the estimated risk of major birth defects and miscarriage in clinically recognized pregnancies is 2‑4% and 15‑20%, respectively.

Clinical Considerations

Labor or Delivery

There are no specific human data regarding any adverse effects of intranasal beclomethasone dipropionate on labor and delivery.

Data

Animal Data

In an embryofetal development study in pregnant rats, beclomethasone dipropionate administration during organogenesis from gestation days 6 to 15 at inhaled doses 350 times the MRHD in adults and higher (on a mg/m2 basis at maternal doses of 11.5 and 28.3 mg/kg/day) produced dose‑dependent gross injury (characterized by red foci) of the adrenal glands in fetuses. There were no findings in the adrenal glands of rat fetuses at an inhaled dose that was 75 times the MRHD in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal dose of 2.4 mg/kg/day). There was no evidence of external or skeletal malformations or embryolethality in rats at inhaled doses up to 860 times the MRHD (on a mg/m2 basis at maternal doses up to 28.3 mg/kg/day).

In an embryofetal development study in pregnant mice, beclomethasone dipropionate administration from gestation days 1 to 18 at subcutaneous doses equal to and greater than 1.5 times the MRHD in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at maternal doses of 0.1 mg/kg/day and higher) produced adverse developmental effects (increased incidence of cleft palate). A no-effect dose in mice was not identified. In a second embryofetal development study in pregnant mice, beclomethasone dipropionate administration from gestation days 1 to 13 at subcutaneous doses equal to and greater than 5 times the MRHD in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal dose of 0.3 mg/kg/day) produced embryolethal effects (increased fetal resorptions) and decreased pup survival.

In an embryofetal development study in pregnant rabbits, beclomethasone dipropionate administration during organogenesis from gestation days 7 to 16 at subcutaneous doses equal to and greater than 1.5 times the MRHD in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at maternal doses of 0.025 mg/kg/day and higher) produced external and skeletal malformations and embryolethal effects (increased fetal resorptions). There were no effects in fetuses of pregnant rabbits administered a subcutaneous dose 0.4 times the MRHD in adults (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal dose of 0.006 mg/kg/day).

8.2 Lactation

Risk Summary

There are no data available on the presence of beclomethasone dipropionate in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. However, other corticosteroids have been detected in human milk. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother’s clinical need for QNASL and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from beclomethasone dipropionate or from the underlying maternal condition.

8.3 Females and Males of Reproductive Potential

Impairment of fertility was observed in rats and dogs at oral doses of beclomethasone dipropionate corresponding to 500 and 50 times the MRHD for adults on a mg/m2 basis, respectively. [see Nonclinical Toxicology (13.1) ].

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of QNASL Nasal Aerosol in children 4 years and older have been established [see Adverse Reactions (6.1), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3), Clinical Studies (14)]. The safety and effectiveness of QNASL Nasal Aerosol in children younger than 4 years of age have not been established. Controlled pediatric clinical trials with QNASL Nasal Aerosol included 909 children 4 to 11 years of age and 188 adolescent patients 12 to 17 years of age [see Clinical Studies (14)].

Controlled clinical trials have shown that intranasal corticosteroids may cause a reduction in growth velocity in pediatric patients. This effect has been observed in the absence of laboratory evidence of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, suggesting that growth velocity is a more sensitive indicator of systemic corticosteroid exposure in pediatric patients than some commonly used tests of HPA-axis function. The long-term effects of reduction in growth velocity associated with intranasal corticosteroids, including the impact on final adult height, are unknown. The potential for “catch-up” growth following discontinuation of treatment with intranasal corticosteroids has not been adequately studied. The growth of pediatric patients receiving intranasal corticosteroids, including QNASL Nasal Aerosol, should be monitored routinely (e.g., via stadiometry).

A 12-month, randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluated the effects of QVAR® , an orally inhaled HFA beclomethasone dipropionate product, without spacer versus chlorofluorocarbon-propelled (CFC) beclomethasone dipropionate with large volume spacer on growth in children with asthma ages 5 to 11 years. A total of 520 patients were enrolled, of whom 394 received HFA-beclomethasone dipropionate (100 to 400 mcg/day ex-valve) and 126 received CFC-beclomethasone dipropionate (200 to 800 mcg/day ex-valve). When comparing results at month 12 to baseline, the mean growth velocity in children treated with HFA-beclomethasone dipropionate was approximately 0.5 cm/year less than that noted with children treated with CFC-beclomethasone dipropionate via large volume spacer. The potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against the clinical benefits obtained and the risks/benefits of treatment alternatives.

The potential for QNASL Nasal Aerosol to cause reduction in growth velocity in susceptible patients or when given at higher than recommended dosages cannot be ruled out.

8.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical trials of QNASL Nasal Aerosol did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 years and older to determine whether they responded differently than younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, administration to elderly patients should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.

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